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Is Visual Studio for Python not equivalent to Visual Studio for Visual Basic or C#? RRS feed

  • Question

  • I notice that Visual Studio supports Python now, which is a interpreted language.   I'm used to working with Visual Basic, which is a compiled language.   I'm thinking of working with a Python library that a professor wrote, and porting it into Visual Studio, but I would need a compiled version.   Is the only way to do it to translate Python line by line into Basic, or is there a quick and easy way to achieve what I want to do using Visual Studio?
    Sunday, September 20, 2020 2:22 PM

Answers

  • I notice that Visual Studio supports Python now, which is a interpreted language.   I'm used to working with Visual Basic, which is a compiled language.   I'm thinking of working with a Python library that a professor wrote, and porting it into Visual Studio, but I would need a compiled version.   Is the only way to do it to translate Python line by line into Basic, or is there a quick and easy way to achieve what I want to do using Visual Studio?

    Why don't you just learn Python?  It's one of the simplest and frankly more powerful interpreted languages. 

    VB is interpreted too and has never been "compiled" in the way that C/++ is.  Same with C#, Java, and a host of others.

    Technically all "compiling" amounts to is taking a bunch of separate code files and making them read end-to-end, so "technically" everything that has an include or import statement is compiled.  So Python is in fact compiled in the end, at least as much as VB is.

    But!  You can reference Python scripts from VB.NET.  Check out this MSDN link from last year.



    Before you can learn anything new you have to learn that there's stuff you don't know.

    • Marked as answer by Gidmaestro Sunday, September 20, 2020 6:58 PM
    Sunday, September 20, 2020 4:10 PM