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Windows 8 Consumer Preview

    General discussion

  • Windows 8 is on the verge of being the next sibling of the Microsoft Operating Systems family. On recent posts, I have read where some state that it is not meant for the Desktop or non-touch operating environments. Given that statement, what would be considered the best computer (laptop and desktop) to efficiently support the Windows 8 operating system, and how affordable would it be to those who want to experience the new OS but can't quite financially bear the hardware migration?

    We live to learn, We learn to develop, We develop to operate... o(._.)o

    Wednesday, February 22, 2012 12:26 AM

All replies

  • That is an opinion only you can generate as each persons requirements differ.  Are you currently using the Dev Preview?  What do you think?
    • Edited by DarienHawk67 Wednesday, February 22, 2012 12:51 AM
    Wednesday, February 22, 2012 12:51 AM
  • You can use the desktop much as you have with W7 and do not need a touchscreen. The most noticeable changes are the toolbar of Windows Explorer and the new task manager.

    Incorporated in W8 are Metro apps. These can be run on a desktop computer using the keyboard but it is not a satisfying experience. Ideally you would need a laptop or pad with a touchscreen.

    The dilema then is this. You can run conventional programs on the desktop or Metro apps on a pad  but IMO the two should not mix. Unfortunately Microsoft in its wisdom has removed the 'start' panel from the desktop and made the Metro start screen the default location for starting programs. It is this which has been the topic of many a discussion.

    As far as hardware is concerned for running Metro apps with a touchscreen, you would be advised to wait until near the release of W8 when compatible pads or laptops are more likely to be on sale.

    Wednesday, February 22, 2012 12:59 AM
  • That is an opinion only you can generate as each persons requirements differ.  Are you currently using the Dev Preview?  What do you think?

    Yes I am. However, I myself am using a no-touch notebook computer and find the functions of this particular OS to be of ease and no boggle. Of course, there are some hang-ups- but that's to be expected. I was only trying to fish out some info on what the community thinks about this issue because of the much negative feedback I've read so far. Maybe if some peopl understood the full concept of this OS, then they won't be so quick to pull the trigger on this product so early- that is all! 

    We live to learn, We learn to develop, We develop to operate... o(._.)o

    Wednesday, February 22, 2012 2:17 AM
  • You can use the desktop much as you have with W7 and do not need a touchscreen. The most noticeable changes are the toolbar of Windows Explorer and the new task manager.

    Incorporated in W8 are Metro apps. These can be run on a desktop computer using the keyboard but it is not a satisfying experience. Ideally you would need a laptop or pad with a touchscreen.

    The dilema then is this. You can run conventional programs on the desktop or Metro apps on a pad  but IMO the two should not mix. Unfortunately Microsoft in its wisdom has removed the 'start' panel from the desktop and made the Metro start screen the default location for starting programs. It is this which has been the topic of many a discussion.

    As far as hardware is concerned for running Metro apps with a touchscreen, you would be advised to wait until near the release of W8 when compatible pads or laptops are more likely to be on sale.


    I like your response; In addition, I would like to ask you why do you think the two shouldn't mix- wouldn't one like the advantage of possessing the ability to execute both conventional applications and Metro applications on one platform? Also, the start panel can be enabled through a program called Blue Poison; although, I do believe it will be apart of the RTM (what's the big deal?)

    We live to learn, We learn to develop, We develop to operate... o(._.)o

    Wednesday, February 22, 2012 2:27 AM
  • I like your response; In addition, I would like to ask you why do you think the two shouldn't mix- wouldn't one like the advantage of possessing the ability to execute both conventional applications and Metro applications on one platform? Also, the start panel can be enabled through a program called Blue Poison; although, I do believe it will be apart of the RTM (what's the big deal?)
    Almost nobody here is saying we should not have both conventional dektop programs and the new Metro programs in Windows 8.
     
    What many are saying is that they should not have to switch to the Metro Start Screen in order to launch dektop applications. They want both the conventional Start Menu and the Metro Start Screen. Yes, this would make the two aspects of Windows 8 more separate, but these people think this would be preferable to the force-joining of the two via the Metro Start Screen.
     
    I don't know about Blue Poison specifically, but most programs of this type enable the conventional Start Menu at the expense of completely diabling the Metro Start Screen and Metro applications. This is most certainly not what I want. If I wanted to do that I would just stick with Windows 7.
     

    David Wilkinson | Visual C++ MVP
    Wednesday, February 22, 2012 2:50 AM
  • I like your response; In addition, I would like to ask you why do you think the two shouldn't mix- wouldn't one like the advantage of possessing the ability to execute both conventional applications and Metro applications on one platform? Also, the start panel can be enabled through a program called Blue Poison; although, I do believe it will be apart of the RTM (what's the big deal?)

    Almost nobody here is saying we should not have both conventional dektop programs and the new Metro programs in Windows 8.
     
    What many are saying is that they should not have to switch to the Metro Start Screen in order to launch dektop applications. They want both the conventional Start Menu and the Metro Start Screen. Yes, this would make the two aspects of Windows 8 more separate, but these people think this would be preferable to the force-joining of the two via the Metro Start Screen.
     
    I don't know about Blue Poison specifically, but most programs of this type enable the conventional Start Menu at the expense of completely diabling the Metro Start Screen and Metro applications. This is most certainly not what I want. If I wanted to do that I would just stick with Windows 7.
     

    David Wilkinson | Visual C++ MVP
    I get your point. Oh and by the way, Blue Poison is by Windows Italia and it doesn't disable any functions dealing with system that I've noticed... o(._.)o

    We live to learn, We learn to develop, We develop to operate... o(._.)o

    Wednesday, February 22, 2012 3:30 AM
  • Hi guys,

    it might help to read the blog post Experiencing Windows 8 touch on Windows 7 hardware, you will find a list of the devices Microsoft currently has in its test labs.


    Irfan

    Wednesday, February 22, 2012 8:29 AM
  • I don't know about Blue Poison specifically, but most programs of this type enable the conventional Start Menu at the expense of completely diabling the Metro Start Screen and Metro applications. This is most certainly not what I want. If I wanted to do that I would just stick with Windows 7.
     

    David Wilkinson | Visual C++ MVP

    I just wanted to point out one thing about that...

    I really do want windows 8, I just don't want the lame moblie/touch features like metro UI. Windows 8 adds some kinda neat features that aren't in Windows 7, like the nicer TaskManager, or the Ribbon explorer (its ok) or my favorite is its quick boot even with an older slow IDE harddisk it can boot within 8 seconds, which is a lot faster than hibernate on W7 and would save power better than sleep.

    Wednesday, February 22, 2012 8:32 AM
  • You can use the desktop much as you have with W7 and do not need a touchscreen. The most noticeable changes are the toolbar of Windows Explorer and the new task manager.

    Incorporated in W8 are Metro apps. These can be run on a desktop computer using the keyboard but it is not a satisfying experience. Ideally you would need a laptop or pad with a touchscreen.

    The dilema then is this. You can run conventional programs on the desktop or Metro apps on a pad  but IMO the two should not mix. Unfortunately Microsoft in its wisdom has removed the 'start' panel from the desktop and made the Metro start screen the default location for starting programs. It is this which has been the topic of many a discussion.

    As far as hardware is concerned for running Metro apps with a touchscreen, you would be advised to wait until near the release of W8 when compatible pads or laptops are more likely to be on sale.


    I like your response; In addition, I would like to ask you why do you think the two shouldn't mix- wouldn't one like the advantage of possessing the ability to execute both conventional applications and Metro applications on one platform? Also, the start panel can be enabled through a program called Blue Poison; although, I do believe it will be apart of the RTM (what's the big deal?)

    We live to learn, We learn to develop, We develop to operate... o(._.)o

    I do not know what the average family computer is used for (or even if they need one). Dad will probably use the desktop while the kids run Metro apps. I have no objection to both being on the same platform but they should not need to interact with each other. However, I just have a mobile phone that does one thing, it makes phone calls. I also do not have a pad. I am not interested in Metro apps or any other pages that fill my screen and cannot be got rid of. I just want to multitask on dual screens on the desktop. 

    A while ago I ran the W7RC and liked it so much I bought the RTM (but not the company). The same cannot be said for the PD. So far I have not seen much to make me move from W7 although I must admit I have not used it that much. When the beta arrives I hope to obtain a better comparison (for what I do) between W7 and W8 bearing in mind the better memory management and maybe other things.

    Wednesday, February 22, 2012 12:46 PM
  • On recent posts, I have read where some state that it is not meant for the Desktop or non-touch operating environments. Given that statement, what would be considered the best computer (laptop and desktop) to efficiently support the Windows 8 operating system,

    That simply isn't true and I'd be very wary about making any kind of purchasing decision simply based on the comments of people who have, at best, seen an early developer preview. The only real reason to buy new hardware for Windows 8 would be if you are developing an application that very specifically needs multi-touch.

    All Windows 7 hardware should be capable of running Windows 8 and any decision on a future purchase for your own use would be far better left till Windows 8 hardware becomes available with the final release of the OS.

    Wednesday, February 22, 2012 1:08 PM
  • All Windows 7 hardware should be capable of running Windows 8 and any decision on a future purchase for your own use would be far better left till Windows 8 hardware becomes available with the final release of the OS.

    Or till hardware vendors start promising a free upgrade to Windows8, as they did prior to Windows7 release.

    Irfan


    • Edited by Irfanfare Wednesday, February 22, 2012 1:29 PM grammar/
    Wednesday, February 22, 2012 1:28 PM
  • All Windows 7 hardware should be capable of running Windows 8 and any decision on a future purchase for your own use would be far better left till Windows 8 hardware becomes available with the final release of the OS.

    Or till hardware vendors start promising a free upgrade to Windows8, as they did prior to Windows7 release.

    Irfan



    I think that would suffice, I mean.. it is totally different from any other OS produced by Microsoft.

    We live to learn, We learn to develop, We develop to operate... o(._.)o

    Wednesday, February 22, 2012 7:19 PM
  • One of the things that I thoroughly loved was the ability to disable the new taskbar with regedit. Getting rid of that has made my windows 8 experience on the dev preview a charm. Disabling IPv6 is always a nice start too, since it's currently not much of a "standard". Get the old start bar back: run (for those who have difficulty getting to 'run' like i did, go to my computer, C:\ and the simplest method is to search regedit, or just go to your windows folder) regedit HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer change RPEnabled from "1" to "0" for those who didn't already know.
    • Edited by Omegahandle Friday, February 24, 2012 7:31 AM
    Friday, February 24, 2012 7:28 AM
  • what would be considered the best computer (laptop and desktop) to efficiently support the Windows 8 operating system

    I'ld say that Windows 8 will shine best on hybrid systems.

    Tablets you can convert to other form factors.

    The sliding 7 pc of samsung for example, is a tablet that transforms into a laptop.

    What I hope to find -as my next pc no less- is a tablet that can be docked in some docking station (much like laptops dock into docking stations) which will also provide additional horsepower.

    At the very least, it should have multiple HDMI outputs.

    I'll have my tablet with low-power consuming metro apps AND I'll have my desktop in that same machine as well.

    Hook up keyboard, mouse and 2 27" screens and fire up VS2011.

    Friday, February 24, 2012 9:07 AM
  • what would be considered the best computer (laptop and desktop) to efficiently support the Windows 8 operating system

    I'ld say that Windows 8 will shine best on hybrid systems.

    Tablets you can convert to other form factors.

    The sliding 7 pc of samsung for example, is a tablet that transforms into a laptop.

    What I hope to find -as my next pc no less- is a tablet that can be docked in some docking station (much like laptops dock into docking stations) which will also provide additional horsepower.

    At the very least, it should have multiple HDMI outputs.

    I'll have my tablet with low-power consuming metro apps AND I'll have my desktop in that same machine as well.

    Hook up keyboard, mouse and 2 27" screens and fire up VS2011.

    This sounds interesting. Have you, by any chance, tested out this sliding 7 pc? Also, I agree with you on the multiple HDMI outputs, that would be very useful- maybe even 3D capabilities also!

    We live to learn, We learn to develop, We develop to operate... o(._.)o

    Saturday, February 25, 2012 5:31 PM
  • This sounds interesting. Have you, by any chance, tested out this sliding 7 pc? Also, I agree with you on the multiple HDMI outputs, that would be very useful- maybe even 3D capabilities also!


    We live to learn, We learn to develop, We develop to operate... o(._.)o

    Yeah, I played around a bit with it at some events and in some stores.

    It's pretty nice, but performance was really poor.  Plus, it worked on win7, so the touch-friendlyness was pretty much non-existant, lol.

    HDMI outputs on the docking would be no problem at all - they have that today for laptops.
    What I think would be VERY interesting is actual additional horsepower IN the docking.

    This would provide a light, thin tablet that doesn't need a fan (like the //Build one - a fan in a tablet... lol) AND it would be transformable into an actual powerhouse to do real work when hooking it up to big screens.

    Although I don't think we will see this in win8, it sounds pretty ambitious.

    Can you imagine?  Docking a tablet and suddenly having access to additional RAM, additional CPU's, additional GPU,...

    That would be so need...

    When you then think about the convergence between windows phone en windows itself....

    Suddenly it becomes possible to have a windows phone, which actually has a full PC hidden away in it when hooking it up to a "power dock".  Much like the Ubuntu-on-Android thing that just came out.

    Would be awesome.

    Sunday, February 26, 2012 7:19 PM
  • This sounds interesting. Have you, by any chance, tested out this sliding 7 pc? Also, I agree with you on the multiple HDMI outputs, that would be very useful- maybe even 3D capabilities also!


    We live to learn, We learn to develop, We develop to operate... o(._.)o

    Yeah, I played around a bit with it at some events and in some stores.

    It's pretty nice, but performance was really poor.  Plus, it worked on win7, so the touch-friendlyness was pretty much non-existant, lol.

    HDMI outputs on the docking would be no problem at all - they have that today for laptops.
    What I think would be VERY interesting is actual additional horsepower IN the docking.

    This would provide a light, thin tablet that doesn't need a fan (like the //Build one - a fan in a tablet... lol) AND it would be transformable into an actual powerhouse to do real work when hooking it up to big screens.

    Although I don't think we will see this in win8, it sounds pretty ambitious.

    Can you imagine?  Docking a tablet and suddenly having access to additional RAM, additional CPU's, additional GPU,...

    That would be so need...

    When you then think about the convergence between windows phone en windows itself....

    Suddenly it becomes possible to have a windows phone, which actually has a full PC hidden away in it when hooking it up to a "power dock".  Much like the Ubuntu-on-Android thing that just came out.

    Would be awesome.


    Yes, exactly! By the way, that sounds similar to the Motorola Atrix concept- except it would need some extra features like what you speak of. This concept that you speak of would really be awesome, especially if you have a bad ass processor in the phone that could match up as a dual when mounted to the dock; this, plus additional ram and SSD made accessible through the docking station would be awesome. Maybe I'm getting a little rampid here but it just sounds cool huh?

    We live to learn, We learn to develop, We develop to operate... o(._.)o

    Wednesday, February 29, 2012 5:52 AM