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IOPS not changed? RRS feed

  • Question

  • I recently changed a disk on an Azure VM from Standard HDD to Standard SSD to improve performance. However the estimated performance remains unchanged: IOPS limit 500 and throughput limit 60MB/s.

    Is this expected and how do I know that the SSD is actually giving me better performance?

    Wednesday, February 13, 2019 10:01 AM

Answers

  • Premium SSD disks, perform better than Standard SSD disks, with very low latencies, high IOPS/throughput and even better consistency with provisioned disk performance, and it is the recommended disk type for all other production workloads.

    Based on your requirement, if you’re leveraging Standard SSD then to further improve the performance you can add more disks and set them up using Storage Space on the VM itself.

    Do click on "Mark as Answer" on the post that helps you, this can be beneficial to other community members.


    Friday, February 15, 2019 8:17 AM

All replies

  • Hello,

    i think standard HHD or Standard SSD  will give u the same 

    Ref : https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/pricing/details/managed-disks/

    correct me if am wrong

    1.         Premium SSD
    • Supports up to 20,000 IOPs
    • <1ms read/write latency
    • 750 Mbps
    2.       Standard SSD
    • Supports up to 2,000 IOPs
    • <1ms read/write latency
    • 500 Mbps
    3.       Standard HHD
    • Supports up to 2,000 IOPs
    • <1ms read/write latency
    • 500 Mbps
    Wednesday, February 13, 2019 10:29 AM

  • This is article provides the summary comparison of DISK types

    Additional information:

    How to monitor and alert potential Disk and VM Level IO Throttling on Windows VMs using ARM
    IOPS is number of requests that your application is sending to the storage disks in one second. An input/output operation could be read or write, sequential or random. OLTP applications like an online retail website need to process many concurrent user requests immediately. The user requests are insert and update intensive database transactions, which the application must process quickly. Therefore, OLTP applications require very high IOPS. Such applications handle millions of small and random IO requests. If you have such an application, you must design the application infrastructure to optimize for IOPS. In the later section, Optimizing Application Performance, we discuss in detail all the factors that you must consider to get high IOPS.

    When you attach a premium storage disk to your high scale VM, Azure provisions for you a guaranteed number of IOPS as per the disk specification. For example, a P50 disk provisions 7500 IOPS. Each high scale VM size also has a specific IOPS limit that it can sustain. For example, a Standard GS5 VM has 80,000 IOPS limit.

    In Azure, you can attach several premium storage disks to a VM. Using multiple disks gives your applications up to 256 TB of storage per VM, if you use the preview sizes your application can have up to around 2 PiB of storage per VM. With Premium Storage, your applications can achieve 80,000 I/O operations per second (IOPS) per VM, and a disk throughput of up to 2,000 megabytes per second (MB/s) per VM. Read operations give you very low latencies.


    Wednesday, February 13, 2019 10:32 AM
  • Alright, so given standard SSDs and HDDs aren't that different my best option to improve performance is to add more disks and set them up using a software raid or Storage Space on the VM itself?
    Wednesday, February 13, 2019 11:44 AM
  • Premium SSD disks, perform better than Standard SSD disks, with very low latencies, high IOPS/throughput and even better consistency with provisioned disk performance, and it is the recommended disk type for all other production workloads.

    Based on your requirement, if you’re leveraging Standard SSD then to further improve the performance you can add more disks and set them up using Storage Space on the VM itself.

    Do click on "Mark as Answer" on the post that helps you, this can be beneficial to other community members.


    Friday, February 15, 2019 8:17 AM