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USB type C connector client driver reference code RRS feed

Answers

  • Please note that you don't need to write a new client driver for type C. If your device is still USB, the regular USB client driver (i.e. that works for a regular type A to B connection), will continue to work. If you device is more than USB (i.e. it has alternate modes), the answer will depend on the specific alternate mode. Even in that case, the driver will not really be tied to Type C as such; it would just be a matter of what drivers are needed to support that alternate mode.
    Tuesday, April 19, 2016 7:41 PM
  • As you probably know, there isn't a sample in the WDK, yet. I don't know when such a sample will be released, but it will probably coincide with a major release of the WDK, such as in July-ish when Redstone1/Anniversary Edition is released.

    The docs provide a pretty good description on what to do. Any experienced WDF driver writer shouldn't have a problem writing one of these.

     -Brian


    Azius Developer Training www.azius.com Windows device driver, internals, security, & forensics training and consulting. Blog at www.azius.com/blog

    Tuesday, April 19, 2016 7:23 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • As you probably know, there isn't a sample in the WDK, yet. I don't know when such a sample will be released, but it will probably coincide with a major release of the WDK, such as in July-ish when Redstone1/Anniversary Edition is released.

    The docs provide a pretty good description on what to do. Any experienced WDF driver writer shouldn't have a problem writing one of these.

     -Brian


    Azius Developer Training www.azius.com Windows device driver, internals, security, & forensics training and consulting. Blog at www.azius.com/blog

    Tuesday, April 19, 2016 7:23 PM
    Moderator
  • Please note that you don't need to write a new client driver for type C. If your device is still USB, the regular USB client driver (i.e. that works for a regular type A to B connection), will continue to work. If you device is more than USB (i.e. it has alternate modes), the answer will depend on the specific alternate mode. Even in that case, the driver will not really be tied to Type C as such; it would just be a matter of what drivers are needed to support that alternate mode.
    Tuesday, April 19, 2016 7:41 PM
  • Hi Vivek,

    Thanks for the reply.

    Yes. We need to support alternate mode.

    The hardware will be newly developed, and the functionality will be as follows.

    It will be acting as displayport and it will be connected to display. It will also do other operations such as saving video to an USB stick etc.

    Now, for supporting this, I assume I need to customize the Client driver. Whether my assumption is correct?

    And, my query was, whether I would be needed to develop this from scratch? Or there will be some reference code for this? (As I'm aware, there is default support for UCSI compliant drivers. Will Microsoft provide source code for my customization?)


    Regards,

    GNK

    Wednesday, April 20, 2016 3:12 AM
  • Hi Brian,

    Thanks for the reply.

    I'm new for WDK actually.

    By docs, do you mean the links that I've mentioned in question?

    Do we have any other docs for this?

    Regards,

    GNK

    Wednesday, April 20, 2016 3:15 AM
  • The Ucm stuff sits on top of WDF, so you will need to learn how to write a WDF driver, which is documented and there are many samples. To speed up your development, you might want to take a class

     -Brian


    Azius Developer Training www.azius.com Windows device driver, internals, security, & forensics training and consulting. Blog at www.azius.com/blog

    Wednesday, April 20, 2016 3:25 AM
    Moderator
  • I think we need to distinguish between what is required to bring up a Type C system (i.e. a pc or phone running Windows) Vs. what is required to bring-up a Type C peripheral that attaches to that system. UCM/UCSI are only relevant in the context of a system bring-up. When you connect a peripheral that supports display port alternate mode to a Type C windows system that also supports display port, it should simply work (as long as the device following the standard type c/pd spec); there should be no need to write a custom driver. After the initial alternate mode negotiation is completed, the peripheral will appear as any other Display port device and should work.

    If your peripheral has USB components, in addition to the display port, whether you need to write a custom driver for it depends on the exact functionality exposed by those USB components. If that USB component belongs to a USB class, you don't need a write a custom driver; otherwise you do. This is the same criteria that you would use for a non type C USB device.

    Friday, April 22, 2016 8:09 PM
  • This should be made much more clear in the documentation

     -Brian


    Azius Developer Training www.azius.com Windows device driver, internals, security, & forensics training and consulting. Blog at www.azius.com/blog

    Friday, April 22, 2016 9:04 PM
    Moderator