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Localisation, SEO and Search Engine Indexation Considerations RRS feed

  • Question

  • User825643875 posted

    I am in the process of considering how best to translate my website into a number of different European languages.

    For this to be worthwhile I need to ensure that the search engines index the new content.

    What are the best strategies to ensure that this happens and that I get the most SEO advantage?

    Thanks

    Will

    Monday, February 28, 2011 12:57 PM

Answers

  • User-610330605 posted

    Am I likely to have issues regarding div sizes and layout and the translated language exceeding the space etc.

    From your previous post I understand that you will be handling only European languages and dus to this reason i dont think you will face serious issues. Major issues happen if you use eastern languages like chinese, japanese etc with European languages. So nothing to worry.

    Also to my uneducated mind it seems almost as elegant just to create whole new individual websites.

    Sort of following this methodology...

    • Create a content table with each of the languages in.
    • Run a find and replace on the asp.net files
    • do a few other things no doubt

    I will never recommend this. This is plain duplication. Unless you really present customised stuff to different "locations" but that is Internationalisation and not localisation.

    The extra code that needs to be created to manage the different languages I suspect will end up making the html mark up pretty messy.

    I didnt understand this. Can you explain?

    People say that the microsoft localisation method is more maintainable but I would have thought that as long as you have a set methodology for doing releases it should be fairly straight forward.

    In the sentence you mentioned correctly "more maintainable". Your solution is maintainable but maintainability is very less since you duplicate stuff.

    The MS localisation methodology seems like its a good idea in theory but I wonder how many websites actually do it that way?

    Many :-)

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Wednesday, March 2, 2011 5:39 PM

All replies

  • User-610330605 posted

    1. Use different URLs for each language. You can use subdomains or modify the path (URL rewriting) or use parameter.

    For eg http://sv.domain.com for Swedish, http://de.domain.com for German, http://en.domain.com for English
    or http://www.domain.com/sv for Swedish, http://www.domain.com/de for German, http://www.domain.com/en for English
    or http://www.domain.com?hl=sv for Swedish, http://www.domain.com?hl=de for German

    Find the language codes here -> http://www.loc.gov/standards/iso639-2/php/code_list.php

    2. Add meta tag on the page

    <meta http-equiv="content-language" content="en">

    3. Incoming links to a particular URL of your site (which you designed based on language) should be from a page with the same language

    Monday, February 28, 2011 3:51 PM
  • User825643875 posted

    Thanks for the reply, Jerry.

    Am I likely to have issues regarding div sizes and layout and the translated language exceeding the space etc.

    Also to my uneducated mind it seems almost as elegant just to create whole new individual websites.

    Sort of following this methodology...

    • Create a content table with each of the languages in.
    • Run a find and replace on the asp.net files
    • do a few other things no doubt

    The extra code that needs to be created to manage the different languages I suspect will end up making the html mark up pretty messy.

    People say that the microsoft localisation method is more maintainable but I would have thought that as long as you have a set methodology for doing releases it should be fairly straight forward.

    The MS localisation methodology seems like its a good idea in theory but I wonder how many websites actually do it that way?

    Any thoughts.

    Will

     

    Wednesday, March 2, 2011 5:10 PM
  • User-610330605 posted

    Am I likely to have issues regarding div sizes and layout and the translated language exceeding the space etc.

    From your previous post I understand that you will be handling only European languages and dus to this reason i dont think you will face serious issues. Major issues happen if you use eastern languages like chinese, japanese etc with European languages. So nothing to worry.

    Also to my uneducated mind it seems almost as elegant just to create whole new individual websites.

    Sort of following this methodology...

    • Create a content table with each of the languages in.
    • Run a find and replace on the asp.net files
    • do a few other things no doubt

    I will never recommend this. This is plain duplication. Unless you really present customised stuff to different "locations" but that is Internationalisation and not localisation.

    The extra code that needs to be created to manage the different languages I suspect will end up making the html mark up pretty messy.

    I didnt understand this. Can you explain?

    People say that the microsoft localisation method is more maintainable but I would have thought that as long as you have a set methodology for doing releases it should be fairly straight forward.

    In the sentence you mentioned correctly "more maintainable". Your solution is maintainable but maintainability is very less since you duplicate stuff.

    The MS localisation methodology seems like its a good idea in theory but I wonder how many websites actually do it that way?

    Many :-)

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Wednesday, March 2, 2011 5:39 PM
  • User825643875 posted

    Thanks Jerry.

    I guess I am stalling having to get my head round this 'new stuff'.

    I suspect that its going to be quite fiddly.

    Do you have any good articles on the subject?

     

    Wednesday, March 2, 2011 5:43 PM