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$whatisthis$ RRS feed

  • Question

  • In a Microsoft Word 2010 document I am working with there are these tag looking items with dollar sign in front and back.

    When selecting them there isn't any context information so I have no idea what they are or how to create my own which is what I need to do because the code I am working with uses these' tags'.

    What are they?

    Thursday, April 24, 2014 6:33 PM

Answers

  • Aside from the $ characters, what you've posted looks like what you'd expect to see if you'd used Insert|Quick Parts|Document Property> Subject. Until filled in, that would ordinarily show [Subject] where your insertion point appears.

    Cheers
    Paul Edstein
    [MS MVP - Word]

    Friday, April 25, 2014 5:49 AM
  • Hi SEAN_MCAD,

    I think it's "Content Control", you could go to Developer tab, then click "Plain Text Content Control" to insert a Plain Text Content Control into the current document.

    The string with two "$" I think is actually a custom tag of the content control, you could click Properties to see it:

    Then why we need content controls in Word document? Please see the MSDN document here:

    Content Controls

    Content controls provide a way for you to design documents and templates that have these features:


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    Friday, April 25, 2014 3:10 PM
    Moderator
  • The $subject$ is probably the title of a content control.

    With the control selected (or the insertion point inside it as you seem to have), click on the Properties icon in the Developer tab, and you should be able to see that.

    If that's the case, it's just a title, nothing more. It may be that the creator of the document was naming the controls with a particular purpose in mind - e.g., they had some code that filled a control with title "$xyz$" from a database field called "xyz", but it's impossible to tell without further infromation about the document.


    Peter Jamieson

    Friday, April 25, 2014 3:10 PM

All replies

  • Aside from the $ characters, what you've posted looks like what you'd expect to see if you'd used Insert|Quick Parts|Document Property> Subject. Until filled in, that would ordinarily show [Subject] where your insertion point appears.

    Cheers
    Paul Edstein
    [MS MVP - Word]

    Friday, April 25, 2014 5:49 AM
  • Aside from the $ characters, what you've posted looks like what you'd expect to see if you'd used Insert|Quick Parts|Document Property> Subject. Until filled in, that would ordinarily show [Subject] where your insertion point appears.

    Cheers
    Paul Edstein
    [MS MVP - Word]


    Well the document has other customized tags its just a coincidence the name on my sample is out of the box quickpart. I also looked for the customized tags in quickparts but they where not there.
    Friday, April 25, 2014 1:41 PM
  • Hi SEAN_MCAD,

    I think it's "Content Control", you could go to Developer tab, then click "Plain Text Content Control" to insert a Plain Text Content Control into the current document.

    The string with two "$" I think is actually a custom tag of the content control, you could click Properties to see it:

    Then why we need content controls in Word document? Please see the MSDN document here:

    Content Controls

    Content controls provide a way for you to design documents and templates that have these features:


    We are trying to better understand customer views on social support experience, so your participation in this interview project would be greatly appreciated if you have time. Thanks for helping make community forums a great place.
    Click HERE to participate the survey.


    Friday, April 25, 2014 3:10 PM
    Moderator
  • The $subject$ is probably the title of a content control.

    With the control selected (or the insertion point inside it as you seem to have), click on the Properties icon in the Developer tab, and you should be able to see that.

    If that's the case, it's just a title, nothing more. It may be that the creator of the document was naming the controls with a particular purpose in mind - e.g., they had some code that filled a control with title "$xyz$" from a database field called "xyz", but it's impossible to tell without further infromation about the document.


    Peter Jamieson

    Friday, April 25, 2014 3:10 PM