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Visual Studio 2017 performance on i7 processor RRS feed

  • Question

  • How much performance gain will I get while running Visual Studio 2017 on an i7 processor as compared to i5 processor?

    Regards <br/> Partha Mandayam <br/> CEO <br/> Mandayams Inc<br/> http://weblogs.asp.net/pmandayam <br/> http://partha.tripod.com <br/> Consulting expert at Zintro - http://www.zintro.com/expert/mcp111

    Wednesday, June 19, 2019 11:49 AM

All replies

  • To be honest, I think just changing the processor wouldn't make much of a difference to much besides the potential build throughput.

    Performance in Visual Studio is based upon how good your system is generally, not one specific part. For example, I have a Ryzen processor with 8 cores/16 threads (3.8GHz), 32GiB physical RAM, a 500 GB (466 GiB) NVMe SSD and this gives me pretty good performance.


    This is a signature. Any samples given are not meant to have error checking or show best practices. They are meant to just illustrate a point. I may also give inefficient code or introduce some problems to discourage copy/paste coding. This is because the major point of my posts is to aid in the learning process.

    Wednesday, June 19, 2019 2:20 PM
  • Hi mcp111,

    Welcome to MSDN forum.

    As Darran Rowe says, there is little effect for the performance of visual studio. If you want better processing capacity, we suggest you could configure bigger RAM and SSD at the same time.

    Any feedback will be expected.

    Best Regards,

    Dylan


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    Thursday, June 20, 2019 11:11 AM
  • But an i7 processor runs at 1.8Ghz whereas i5 runs at 1.6GHz.

    So shouldn't everything run faster?

    Are you saying i7 will not improve application development efficiency?

    Then why use i7?


    Regards <br/> Partha Mandayam <br/> CEO <br/> Mandayams Inc<br/> http://weblogs.asp.net/pmandayam <br/> http://partha.tripod.com <br/> Consulting expert at Zintro - http://www.zintro.com/expert/mcp111

    Thursday, June 20, 2019 11:59 AM
  • Are you saying i7 will not improve application development efficiency?

    No, I was saying that the entire system determines the performance and the effect of the processor is not actually that significant.

    Given the speeds that you mentioned there could be a couple of processors that match them. From the ones that I have seen the biggest difference is the cache and the boost clocks. For example, the Core i5 8265U has a 6MiB cache, a base clock of 1.6GHz and a boost clock of 3.9GHz to 3.7GHz depending on how many cores.

    The Core i7 8565U has an 8MiB cache, a base clock of 1.8GHz and a boost clock of 4.6GHz to 4.1GHz depending on how many cores.

    Since they have identical core counts then I would be surprised to see much difference in performance between the two. The i7 will definitely do better, especially if you connect it to AC power, but not by a significant amount.

    But then again, if I was to make any suggestions, I would suggest against a tablet or a low power laptop for development. If you are actually concerned about performance then a desktop system or a high powered laptop would give you much better performance in general. These processors tend to have higher core counts which helps a lot with efficiency and throughput.


    This is a signature. Any samples given are not meant to have error checking or show best practices. They are meant to just illustrate a point. I may also give inefficient code or introduce some problems to discourage copy/paste coding. This is because the major point of my posts is to aid in the learning process.

    Thursday, June 20, 2019 1:20 PM
  • How do you say they have identical cores?

    An i5 has 4 cores while an i7 has 6 cores.

    And what is the advantage of SSD?

    Why are configurations listed as mostly HDD and some SDD?

    eg 2 TB +256GB SSD

    The processor is the core of the system. So when you say entire system determines the performance and not only the processor, what other factors are you considering?

    If I wanted to estimate how much faster an i7 would perform as compared to an i5 for application development with Visual Studio, then how would I go about it?


    Regards <br/> Partha Mandayam <br/> CEO <br/> Mandayams Inc<br/> http://weblogs.asp.net/pmandayam <br/> http://partha.tripod.com <br/> Consulting expert at Zintro - http://www.zintro.com/expert/mcp111

    Thursday, June 20, 2019 1:27 PM
  • How do you say they have identical cores? An i5 has 4 cores while an i7 has 6 cores.

    I was talking about the two I listed, but also the amount of cores that they have depends on the processor itself. The i7 8565U has 4 cores and 8 threads, the i5 8265U has 4 cores and 8 threads.

    If we look at the 9th generation processors, the i5 has 6 cores and the i7 has 8 cores. So the core count depends on the processor model.

    And what is the advantage of SSD?

    Well, my current SSD is capable of 3GB/s read speeds and 2.5GB/s write speeds. The best performing HDDs can get performace of around 160MB/s read speed and 150MB/s write speeds. Having an SSD, even if it isn't an NVMe SSD, increases read and write speeds significantly. This makes a huge difference.

    Why are configurations listed as mostly HDD and some SDD?

    Because SSDs are still relatively more expensive compared to HDD. It is very common to have the larger, slower HDD for storage and the smaller, faster SSD for things like the O/S and programs.

    The processor is the core of the system. So when you say entire system determines the performance and not only the processor, what other factors are you considering?

    RAM and disk. You can't develop without using RAM. When you develop, you can't develop without reading from or writing to files on disk.

    Some really large projects can easily use around 16GiB of RAM when you build them. The C++ debugger in Visual Studio 2019 was made a separate process because in Visual Studio 2017 and earlier, it was possible to cause Visual Studio to run out of address space causing it to crash because of how much memory was required. This means that debugging can easily take in excess of 4GiB for large projects.

    When you build C++ projects, the default way that it builds is that it reads all of the source files, compiles it and then writes an object file to disk. So this means that if the project has 10,000 source files, in order to build the project it will read 10,000 source files, compiles them and writes 10,000 object files to disk. It would then read these 10,000 object files, links them and then writes out the final executable file. So you can imagine that disk speed is really important.

    Development isn't something that just uses the CPU, physical RAM and the disk drives are also used, and if you are into graphics programming then the GPU is used too.

    If I wanted to estimate how much faster an i7 would perform as compared to an i5 for application development with Visual Studio, then how would I go about it?

    To be honest, I wouldn't know or even guess. I am very much a person who thinks that the only real way to know for sure is through measurement.


    This is a signature. Any samples given are not meant to have error checking or show best practices. They are meant to just illustrate a point. I may also give inefficient code or introduce some problems to discourage copy/paste coding. This is because the major point of my posts is to aid in the learning process.

    Friday, June 21, 2019 1:56 AM