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%complete, %work complete, Physical%complete RRS feed

  • Question

  • We are on a fresh 2010 project server installation. Before I start there are few things about our setup.
    1. All tasks are set at fixed duration
    2. All resources will do timesheets (except for vendor tasks that are performed outside the facilities)

    I understand that the %work complete is updated by timesheets. So if there is a task for 10days 1hr each day, at the end of the 5th day my %work complete is 50%
    In the same scenario, how is %complete updated?
    In the same scenario, how will be Physical %complete updated?

    We need the PMs to report on SPI, so most of the tasks are broken down into 5 day durations. All resources are set at $1/hour.

    Scenario1: At the end of the 5th day, the resource might have completed the task and marks remaining work hours as 0 – this would automatically mark the %work complete as 100%, what happens to the %complete here?
    Scenario2: At the end of the 5th day, the resource has spent 5 hours, but only completed 25% of the work, how can the PM reflect this?

    Should we change the way we are proceeding? Are there any pitfalls with this kind of setup?

    Friday, April 8, 2011 3:36 PM

Answers

  • Understand that there is no "one right way" to do things in a system that is designed to be so flexible that it allows you to hang yourself with relative ease. To begin with, Fixed Duration doesn't seem to represent the reality you describe. It is more likely that you be using the default fixed units for task types, which will give you better results tracking SPI and other earned value calculations.

    When you update work and remaing work, you also update duration. So you update both %Work Complete and % Complete, which should be called % Duration Complete to be less confusing. Understand that Duration is caclulated by the system based on the number of working days that the task spans on the calendar, so it's not always intuitive.

    Scenario1: At the end of the 5th day, the resource might have completed the task and marks remaining work hours as 0 – this would automatically mark the %work complete as 100%, what happens to the %complete here?

    If you are using time entry by day, you need to provide the actual work and the dates it occurred to explain what happens in this scenario. Using the one hour/day over ten days as the basis for the calculation, and the sole team team member assigned enters say, 2hours per day for each of the first 5 days of the planned 10 days, and the Project Manager then accepts the update, the following happens: The system changes the remainign work to 0, the duration changes to 5 days, the % work complete goes to 100% and the % Complete goes to 100%. 


    Scenario2: At the end of the 5th day, the resource has spent 5 hours, but only completed 25% of the work, how can the PM reflect this?

    Again, this depends on how the resource enters the work and what else the resource enters. If the resource reports only 2.5 hours during the first 5 days, then the system tries to reschedule the incomplete work to remaining duration until it can no longer do so.

    There is a programming bias in the scheduling engine that leans toward calculating duration. This is what most people want the tool to do in order to predict schedule and cost slippage. So, don't fight the tool. Let it do it's job and use fixed units for most work with few exceptions.

     

     


    Gary Chefetz, MCITP, MCP, MVP msProjectExperts
    Project and Project ServerFAQs
    Project Server Help BLOG
    • Marked as answer by Raja Bharathi Friday, April 8, 2011 8:25 PM
    Friday, April 8, 2011 8:11 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Understand that there is no "one right way" to do things in a system that is designed to be so flexible that it allows you to hang yourself with relative ease. To begin with, Fixed Duration doesn't seem to represent the reality you describe. It is more likely that you be using the default fixed units for task types, which will give you better results tracking SPI and other earned value calculations.

    When you update work and remaing work, you also update duration. So you update both %Work Complete and % Complete, which should be called % Duration Complete to be less confusing. Understand that Duration is caclulated by the system based on the number of working days that the task spans on the calendar, so it's not always intuitive.

    Scenario1: At the end of the 5th day, the resource might have completed the task and marks remaining work hours as 0 – this would automatically mark the %work complete as 100%, what happens to the %complete here?

    If you are using time entry by day, you need to provide the actual work and the dates it occurred to explain what happens in this scenario. Using the one hour/day over ten days as the basis for the calculation, and the sole team team member assigned enters say, 2hours per day for each of the first 5 days of the planned 10 days, and the Project Manager then accepts the update, the following happens: The system changes the remainign work to 0, the duration changes to 5 days, the % work complete goes to 100% and the % Complete goes to 100%. 


    Scenario2: At the end of the 5th day, the resource has spent 5 hours, but only completed 25% of the work, how can the PM reflect this?

    Again, this depends on how the resource enters the work and what else the resource enters. If the resource reports only 2.5 hours during the first 5 days, then the system tries to reschedule the incomplete work to remaining duration until it can no longer do so.

    There is a programming bias in the scheduling engine that leans toward calculating duration. This is what most people want the tool to do in order to predict schedule and cost slippage. So, don't fight the tool. Let it do it's job and use fixed units for most work with few exceptions.

     

     


    Gary Chefetz, MCITP, MCP, MVP msProjectExperts
    Project and Project ServerFAQs
    Project Server Help BLOG
    • Marked as answer by Raja Bharathi Friday, April 8, 2011 8:25 PM
    Friday, April 8, 2011 8:11 PM
    Moderator
  • You are the best!
    Friday, April 8, 2011 8:26 PM