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App language in charms UI

    Question

  • I've recently published an app in the Windows 8 store in French (fr) and english (en).

    Here are two issues:

    1) If a user's app should be in french , the charm settings of the app are properly display in french but not the native windows charm UI, the user sees:

    Confidentialité (french - ok)

    Permissions         (english)

    Rate & Review     (english)

    I would expect to see:

    Confidentialité

    Authorisations 

    Évaluer et noter

    One solution could be to have a separate windows 'language pack' for modern apps. That would more be more consistent with iOS and Android, when you change the language, the whole UI updates (simple!). There's no way to do this within Windows 8, just change language 'preferences' and reboot. I understand that the whole window 8 UI couldn't just update but I expect at least the modern UI to take into account the new preferences and match the app language. 

    2) I would expect the app to 'reload' (like in iOS and Android) if the user changes his language. This could make sense if you could just change the language of an app directly in the charms 'settings'. By default if would use windows preferences, but a user could have a preferred language 'per application'. This could an optional 'roaming' setting managed by windows.


    • Edited by jbondc Monday, July 08, 2013 3:41 PM
    Monday, July 08, 2013 3:36 PM

Answers

  • The settings UI is an interesting and, from a language perspective, tricky area since some of the UI is provided by the app and some is provided by Windows. What's tricky isn't so much where the content originates but rather which product does it appear to be associated with — that's tricky specifically when the app is running in one language but the Windows UI is in a different language. "Options" are provided by the app and should feel like part of the app. "Permissions" or "Rate and review", on the other hand, are associated with Windows and Windows Store, and should feel like part of those. But it's useful feedback for something we might want to look at how to improve in the future.

    Having apps automatically reload if the user changes their language preferences can also be tricky: the platform has mechanisms that manage loading of app resources, including selecting language variants of resources provided by the app. But an app might also include components that it manages on its own, in which case only the app can handle those. There is an event that an app can subscribe to in order to find out when user preferences change. (In fact, they can even get an event that's aware of what languages the app supports and filters out user preferences changes that wouldn't impact the app.) But the app would need to listen for that event to get the kind of reloading experience you're referring to.

    Another factor in this is resource packs, which are a supported deployment model for app resources starting in Windows 8.1. When an app uses resource packs, the bits downloaded onto a system are only those that a user will actually need -- as reflected in their language preferences and by the DPI and DirectX capabilities of their hardware. (Language, scale and DirectX feature level are three resource qualifiers supported for resource packs.) If the user adds a new language to their profile and makes it their top preference, the app might have resources for that language, but those may not yet be deployed -- they will get deployed as an update, but there may be a bit of delay. So, that means that the immediate reloading won't be possible. That's a tradeoff of using resource packs to reduce download and footprint size.

    - Peter

    Tuesday, July 09, 2013 11:57 PM

All replies

  • Can you please explain the scenario more clearly? What exactly are the language settings for the scenario in question? Do you have a question or are you requesting a behavior change?

    Is the system itself set generally for English? If so, the system provided settings are in English. The app defined settings would be in the app's language.

    --Rob

    Tuesday, July 09, 2013 3:32 AM
    Owner
  • The settings UI is an interesting and, from a language perspective, tricky area since some of the UI is provided by the app and some is provided by Windows. What's tricky isn't so much where the content originates but rather which product does it appear to be associated with — that's tricky specifically when the app is running in one language but the Windows UI is in a different language. "Options" are provided by the app and should feel like part of the app. "Permissions" or "Rate and review", on the other hand, are associated with Windows and Windows Store, and should feel like part of those. But it's useful feedback for something we might want to look at how to improve in the future.

    Having apps automatically reload if the user changes their language preferences can also be tricky: the platform has mechanisms that manage loading of app resources, including selecting language variants of resources provided by the app. But an app might also include components that it manages on its own, in which case only the app can handle those. There is an event that an app can subscribe to in order to find out when user preferences change. (In fact, they can even get an event that's aware of what languages the app supports and filters out user preferences changes that wouldn't impact the app.) But the app would need to listen for that event to get the kind of reloading experience you're referring to.

    Another factor in this is resource packs, which are a supported deployment model for app resources starting in Windows 8.1. When an app uses resource packs, the bits downloaded onto a system are only those that a user will actually need -- as reflected in their language preferences and by the DPI and DirectX capabilities of their hardware. (Language, scale and DirectX feature level are three resource qualifiers supported for resource packs.) If the user adds a new language to their profile and makes it their top preference, the app might have resources for that language, but those may not yet be deployed -- they will get deployed as an update, but there may be a bit of delay. So, that means that the immediate reloading won't be possible. That's a tradeoff of using resource packs to reduce download and footprint size.

    - Peter

    Tuesday, July 09, 2013 11:57 PM