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offline scenario RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello,

     

    I have a device that updates a local database (and possibly may connect to a PC in the future in addition)

    I want to update from this database to the HealthVault account of the user (and download back to the database)

     

    what is the best way to do this?

     

    another question is:

    I don't see how to Use the offline connection method, i mean its a web applicaton that has access to the person's data (after the first time he connected and aproves the app) even after he has logged out , right?

    but how can i make it Run without a user request of a page? I want it to run at certain intervals for synchronizing the local database with HV, how do i accompish that?   (if indeed its the preffered way)

     

    Thank you,

    Abir

     

    Wednesday, February 27, 2008 9:14 AM

Answers

  • hi Abir -

     

    If your device has web connectivity and ssl support then you can transfer the data using offlineline connection. Or if it has just web connectivity then it can talk to your web-service and upload the data, and you web-service can schedule an offline connection job to upload it to healthvault. When you want to use PC, the best solution is to write a WPD driver for this and plug your device in healthvault connection center, you can find more information here.

     

    Wrt using offline connection method and a sample please refer to - http://blogs.msdn.com/healthvault/archive/2008/01/10/offlineline-sample.aspx

     

    Hope this helps.

     

    regards,

    Vaibhav

     

    Wednesday, February 27, 2008 7:02 PM
  • Abir,

     

    There are a few paths that you could take.

     

    For devices that have PC connections and a defined prototocl, getting the data off of the device is usually handled through HealthVault connection center - an application that runs on the client pc - though a normal device driver approach (using WPD, if that helps). Generally, the device manufacturer works with our devices team to create the driver and figure out how the upload will work.

     

    It's also possible to build a healthvault web application that has a component that can talk directly to the device (through a technology like activex). That would be an online application that the user would log into, and then that application would pull the data off the device and put it into the user's HealthVault record.

     

    Finally, it's possible to build what is called an offline application, where the user authorizes the application once, and the application can then pull device data off and push it into that user's record.

     

    The first option is the simplest, but currently only supports one-way data transfer (into HealthVault) but not back down into the device. If you are looking at getting data back down onto the device, the second or the third option would be best.

     

    Can you tell us a bit more about your scenario? What kind of data are you storing, and how does it move from your device to HealthVault and back?

    Thursday, February 28, 2008 5:12 PM
  • Thanks.

     

    The communication to/from HealthVault would be through what we call our "offline" scenario. It basically involves two parts:

     

    1) There is an online part - a standard web application - that the user uses to register with your system and HealthVault. The purpose of this part is to explain what hooking to HealthVault will do for your users, and then to let them authorize your application to access their information. This is the same flow you'd see with a user authorizing any HealthVault application, with the addition that your application would also ask for HealthVault access.

     

    When the user does the authorization, your application will get a user id and a record id that you will need to store in your system with the information about the user.

     

    2) The offline part - the one that moves the data around - can then use that user id and record id to access the user's HealthVault record.

     

    I'd recommend you start by looking at the HelloWorld application - that will show you how you would build the first part. The SDK also includes an offline example that can show you how to build the second part.

     

    If you haven't looked at the other requirements on the msdn website for "going live", you should also look at those.

    Monday, March 10, 2008 4:41 PM

All replies

  • hi Abir -

     

    If your device has web connectivity and ssl support then you can transfer the data using offlineline connection. Or if it has just web connectivity then it can talk to your web-service and upload the data, and you web-service can schedule an offline connection job to upload it to healthvault. When you want to use PC, the best solution is to write a WPD driver for this and plug your device in healthvault connection center, you can find more information here.

     

    Wrt using offline connection method and a sample please refer to - http://blogs.msdn.com/healthvault/archive/2008/01/10/offlineline-sample.aspx

     

    Hope this helps.

     

    regards,

    Vaibhav

     

    Wednesday, February 27, 2008 7:02 PM
  • Thank you for the answer, let me see if I understand, perhaps i lake some knowledge in web-applications:

    i'll simplify things, I have a database and want customers to see it (latest data) in thier healthvault records.

    you are saying I can schedule a web-service with offline connection job to upload it.

    by web-service you mean a web application?

    and could you place a small code example as to how to make such schedule?

     

    Thanks

    Thursday, February 28, 2008 7:59 AM
  • Abir,

     

    There are a few paths that you could take.

     

    For devices that have PC connections and a defined prototocl, getting the data off of the device is usually handled through HealthVault connection center - an application that runs on the client pc - though a normal device driver approach (using WPD, if that helps). Generally, the device manufacturer works with our devices team to create the driver and figure out how the upload will work.

     

    It's also possible to build a healthvault web application that has a component that can talk directly to the device (through a technology like activex). That would be an online application that the user would log into, and then that application would pull the data off the device and put it into the user's HealthVault record.

     

    Finally, it's possible to build what is called an offline application, where the user authorizes the application once, and the application can then pull device data off and push it into that user's record.

     

    The first option is the simplest, but currently only supports one-way data transfer (into HealthVault) but not back down into the device. If you are looking at getting data back down onto the device, the second or the third option would be best.

     

    Can you tell us a bit more about your scenario? What kind of data are you storing, and how does it move from your device to HealthVault and back?

    Thursday, February 28, 2008 5:12 PM
  • Hello Eric,

     

    I'll try to give a more descriptive view on my scenario,

    the device currently is not pc connected nor web enabled, so the first and second options are not viable.

     

    The device send and receive data to our specified internet database server via phone line modem

    I would like to :

    a. make the data from that device in our database available for the customer to view on HV (upload to HV)

    b. allow to update some of the device data from HV back to our database (download from HV)

     

    type of data is two fold:

    1. medication intake weekly schedule

    2. messages regarding status with timedate and a message (example "Took the pill" "Didn't take the pill" etc.)

     

    I'd like the messages and weekly schedule viewed, and schedule could also be updated back to our database.

    Monday, March 10, 2008 9:13 AM
  • Thanks.

     

    The communication to/from HealthVault would be through what we call our "offline" scenario. It basically involves two parts:

     

    1) There is an online part - a standard web application - that the user uses to register with your system and HealthVault. The purpose of this part is to explain what hooking to HealthVault will do for your users, and then to let them authorize your application to access their information. This is the same flow you'd see with a user authorizing any HealthVault application, with the addition that your application would also ask for HealthVault access.

     

    When the user does the authorization, your application will get a user id and a record id that you will need to store in your system with the information about the user.

     

    2) The offline part - the one that moves the data around - can then use that user id and record id to access the user's HealthVault record.

     

    I'd recommend you start by looking at the HelloWorld application - that will show you how you would build the first part. The SDK also includes an offline example that can show you how to build the second part.

     

    If you haven't looked at the other requirements on the msdn website for "going live", you should also look at those.

    Monday, March 10, 2008 4:41 PM