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Silverlight 4 Beginner's Guide RRS feed

  • Question

  • If you are just getting started in Silverlight 4 and want get a book to help you along the way consider taking a look at Silverlight 4 Business Application Development: Beginner's Guide.

    The book is targeted at ASP.NET and WinForms developers who want to get into Silverlight. We take you through some common business scenarios and teach you the Silverlight basics along the way. You can view Chapter 1 of the book online.

    Monday, April 19, 2010 11:03 AM

Answers

  • MVVM certainly has its place but it is not a beginner's path. Beginners should learn how Silverlight works first before attempting to follow the latest development trends. After all, if you understand how the underlying controls, properties, binding, etc. work you can accurately analyze a project and provide the best solution.
    Wednesday, April 21, 2010 11:24 AM

All replies

  • Sounds like a nice book, one question, on the Table Of Content didn't find any entry talking about MVVM pattern, is that missing?

    Tuesday, April 20, 2010 6:49 AM
  • MVVM did not make it into this book, since it is a pretty in-depth topic we felt it better to try and cover the basics.
    Tuesday, April 20, 2010 10:01 AM
  • Mmm...

    On one side you are right before reaching MVVM you have to learn some basics, but on the other many developers are considering MVVM as the core of any Silverlight / WPF development.

    Cheers

      Braulio

    Tuesday, April 20, 2010 10:33 AM
  • Not sure that MVVM is practical for all solutions but that is just my opinion. If we had another 4 or 5 chapters we probably would have covered MVVM.
    Tuesday, April 20, 2010 11:01 AM
  • From my side, I don't use MVVM in few scenarios, or maybe if I have to do some quick test.

    For the rest of developments we have used MVVM (just custom implementation or PRISM based or Lite Toolkit based) and it has be success, I like it because it forces you to do the things in the right way.

     The problem for somebody that begins with Silverlight is that learning to do some basics it's something easily achievable, but learning how to get benefit on all of the SL strong points is not that direct.

    Wednesday, April 21, 2010 10:35 AM
  • I Strongly agree with brauliod, Its really difficult to manage complex project without MVVM in silverlight as I feel.

    Wednesday, April 21, 2010 10:42 AM
  • MVVM certainly has its place but it is not a beginner's path. Beginners should learn how Silverlight works first before attempting to follow the latest development trends. After all, if you understand how the underlying controls, properties, binding, etc. work you can accurately analyze a project and provide the best solution.
    Wednesday, April 21, 2010 11:24 AM
  • Agree that learn basics first is the best, when I work as a trainer first I ensure that the trainees get the basics concepts of binding, INotifiable... once they have that kowledge solid is quite easy and natura to introduce MVVM.

    Wednesday, April 21, 2010 1:32 PM
  • I agree with that, I could see MVVM being part of an intermediate guide :D
    Wednesday, April 21, 2010 1:37 PM
  • He he he he,

    Beginner advanced... intermediate... :).

    The only thing that concerns me is that a Developer normally has a very short time to learn a new technology... then he learn the very basics and probably has to start coding a real application... then he starts coding / architecting the app in the same way as the old WinForms days and that's a pity.

    Cheers

      Braulio

    Thursday, April 22, 2010 12:42 AM