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Have upgrade disk but no longer have qualifying product RRS feed

  • Question

  • Not sure if this is the right place for this question. Years back, I upgraded from FrontPage to Expression Web. I recently migrated to a new computer, and was about to reinstall Expression Web. I now see that I have only the Upgrade disk.

    Since FrontPage had been uninstalled from my previous machine, and was never installed on my new one, how can I install Expression Web? (I do not have any product key available for my former FrontPage; nor do I have my FrontPage disk.)

    If this is not the appropriate forum for this question, can you refer me somewhere?

    Am I SOL?

    Thanks.

    Ken Isaacson
    SILENT COUNSEL, a legal thriller
    Now Available on Kindle
    www.KenIsaacson.com

    Wednesday, March 30, 2011 1:20 PM

Answers

  • FP is not the only product that will qualify you for the upgrade. Got any version of MS Office (and I mean any version)? Got any of the Adobe Creative Suite products? Visual Studio 2005 or later? You're good to go. The best way to find out is to install it. If you don't have one of the kitchen-sink qualifying programs installed it should tell you, although I can't say that I've personally ever seen the warning, since I've always had a qualifier installed.

    cheers,
    scott


    Please remember to "Mark as Answer" the responses that resolved your issue. It is common courtesy to recognize those who have helped you, and it also makes it easier for visitors to find the resolution later.
    • Marked as answer by Ken Isaacson Wednesday, March 30, 2011 4:04 PM
    Wednesday, March 30, 2011 2:45 PM

All replies

  • FP is not the only product that will qualify you for the upgrade. Got any version of MS Office (and I mean any version)? Got any of the Adobe Creative Suite products? Visual Studio 2005 or later? You're good to go. The best way to find out is to install it. If you don't have one of the kitchen-sink qualifying programs installed it should tell you, although I can't say that I've personally ever seen the warning, since I've always had a qualifier installed.

    cheers,
    scott


    Please remember to "Mark as Answer" the responses that resolved your issue. It is common courtesy to recognize those who have helped you, and it also makes it easier for visitors to find the resolution later.
    • Marked as answer by Ken Isaacson Wednesday, March 30, 2011 4:04 PM
    Wednesday, March 30, 2011 2:45 PM
  • Awesome. I have MS Office. I'll give the install a try.

    Thanks.

    Ken Isaacson
    SILENT COUNSEL, a legal thriller
    Now available on Kindle
    www.KenIsaacson.com

    Wednesday, March 30, 2011 3:43 PM
  • Success. Install went smoothly.

    Thanks

    Ken Isaacson

    SILENT COUNSEL, a legal thriller
    Now available on Kindle
    www.KenIsaacson.com

    Wednesday, March 30, 2011 4:04 PM
  • On a similar problem but different, I had a Windows 7 problem where a video card failed and after I installed a new card the drivers must have gotten tangled up and the box never ran right after that. So decided to go ahead and start over. I reformatted the hard drive and loaded Windows 7 (upgrade-- wasn't thinking) and when I got to entering the registration code it just said it wasn't valid.

    After a couple of days of cussing at it,  it finally occurred to me that the issue was the upgrade product. So I had to load Windows XP from scratch and then install Windows 7 on top of that. Now the system is working great however I sure wish I could talk to one of the Microsoft people about my "User Experience" experience.

     

     

    Thursday, March 31, 2011 12:30 AM
  • After a couple of days of cussing at it,  it finally occurred to me that the issue was the upgrade product. So I had to load Windows XP from scratch and then install Windows 7 on top of that. Now the system is working great however I sure wish I could talk to one of the Microsoft people about my "User Experience" experience.

    Bandit, for future reference, you can reinstall Windows 7 from your upgrade DVD. Just follow the instructions from Winsupersite: <http://www.winsupersite.com/article/windows-7/clean-install-windows-7-with-upgrade-media.aspx> When you're done, you haven't been required to install over an old, worn out Windows OS. :)

    As Paul Thurott states at the end of his article: "The methods described above will work for just about anyone and at least two of these methods are supported by Microsoft, if you're a valid, licensed owner of a previous Windows version. (Which is, of course, the assumption.)"

    I never, ever install over an older version of Windows, even if I'm allowed. Doing so just brings along all the problems inherent in the older OS.


    Nancy Ward
    Thursday, March 31, 2011 3:15 AM
  • I wish I had that link before I went to the trouble to reinstall W XP. Interesting though is, when I installed Windows 7  I asked it to deleting the XP partition and creating a new partition for W7. So, W7 must have check the variable for "has qualifying product" before that point.
    Thursday, March 31, 2011 5:40 AM
  • I wish I had that link before I went to the trouble to reinstall W XP. Interesting though is, when I installed Windows 7  I asked it to deleting the XP partition and creating a new partition for W7. So, W7 must have check the variable for "has qualifying product" before that point.

    Yes, Windows checks to see what's there before it ever starts. :) It's cheaper for Microsoft to put the full version on a DVD and let the product key decide what you wish to install. What's great is that you don't have to put the product key in before installation, but you do need it when you activate.


    Nancy Ward
    Thursday, March 31, 2011 3:28 PM
  • Bandit, for future reference, you can reinstall Windows 7 from your upgrade DVD. Just follow the instructions from Winsupersite: <http://www.winsupersite.com/article/windows-7/clean-install-windows-7-with-upgrade-media.aspx> When you're done, you haven't been required to install over an old, worn out Windows OS. :)

    As Paul Thurott states at the end of his article: "The methods described above will work for just about anyone and at least two of these methods are supported by Microsoft, if you're a valid, licensed owner of a previous Windows version. (Which is, of course, the assumption.)"

    I never, ever install over an older version of Windows, even if I'm allowed. Doing so just brings along all the problems inherent in the older OS.


    Nancy, I'm working on upgrading another computer for a friend today. I have a new SATA hard drive installed where the Windows 7 should go and the original Windows XP hard drive on the system. I've been trying to follow the directions on that link you gave me and frankly it is not working. I've restarted the install three times now using those directions and I don't have a positive result. So, I'm going to do what I know works. Install XP and then write over it with Window 7. I'm having a very poor "User Experience" experience today.
    Thursday, March 31, 2011 7:59 PM
  • Nancy, I'm working on upgrading another computer for a friend today. I have a new SATA hard drive installed where the Windows 7 should go and the original Windows XP hard drive on the system. I've been trying to follow the directions on that link you gave me and frankly it is not working. I've restarted the install three times now using those directions and I don't have a positive result. So, I'm going to do what I know works. Install XP and then write over it with Window 7. I'm having a very poor "*User Experience*" experience today.

    Since XP is on the other hard drive, you should be able to use his upgrade copy.


    Nancy Ward
    Friday, April 1, 2011 3:35 AM