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Employee Time Tracking RRS feed

  • Question

  • Experts -

    I have been asked to add functionality to a database that will essentially track the time it takes for an employee to update data.  The business problem is (in generic terms): a database contains data employees to work health care claims.  When the claim is "completed" they mark it as so.  Each morning, another process will load "completed" claims to another database which tracks employee productivity (in this case time/completed claims).  While counting claims completed is automated, the employee must go in to the productivity database and enter time spent manually.  If they forget this step, their productivity numbers get all out of whack.

    So the goal is to somehow automate tracking time spent completing claims.

    Is this even feasible in Access?  I need to provide management with realistic expectations keeping in mind our technology limitations (i.e. MS Access 2010).

    Thank you!


    Bonediggler

    Wednesday, December 23, 2015 7:51 PM

Answers

  • Hi. Whether you do it manually or automatically, you'll only get out what you put into it. So, if users forget to enter their times manually, their productivity numbers will not be accurate. But, if you do it automatically for them, how will you know they're actually spending the time "working" the claim? If you can't determine that accurately, without their intervention, then your numbers could still suffer. Just food for thought...
    Wednesday, December 23, 2015 8:01 PM
  • Each morning, another process will load "completed" claims to another database which tracks employee productivity (in this case time/completed claims).

     I need to provide management with realistic expectations keeping in mind our technology limitations (i.e. MS Access 2010).

    Hi Bonediggler,

    In the AfterUpdate event of the control where the employee mark the claim as completed, you could calculate the time difference between Now and the start of the work on that claim.

    Personally I still use A2003, and I absolutely don't feel this as any limitation, if you have no web aspirations.

    Imb.

    Wednesday, December 23, 2015 8:22 PM
  • The question still remains: how to capture the "start of work on that claim" in an automated fashion?  The goal is to eliminate inaccuracy associated with self-reporting.

    Hi Bonediggler,

    Somehow you have to store the "start of work", in the same way as you store the "end of work": you need two fields.

    How you define the "start of work" and "end of work" is an organization problem, apart form the database.

    Imb.

    Wednesday, December 23, 2015 8:59 PM

All replies

  • Hi. Whether you do it manually or automatically, you'll only get out what you put into it. So, if users forget to enter their times manually, their productivity numbers will not be accurate. But, if you do it automatically for them, how will you know they're actually spending the time "working" the claim? If you can't determine that accurately, without their intervention, then your numbers could still suffer. Just food for thought...
    Wednesday, December 23, 2015 8:01 PM
  • Yes - that was my thinking as well.  However, to convince management I need backup!


    Bonediggler

    Wednesday, December 23, 2015 8:18 PM
  • Each morning, another process will load "completed" claims to another database which tracks employee productivity (in this case time/completed claims).

     I need to provide management with realistic expectations keeping in mind our technology limitations (i.e. MS Access 2010).

    Hi Bonediggler,

    In the AfterUpdate event of the control where the employee mark the claim as completed, you could calculate the time difference between Now and the start of the work on that claim.

    Personally I still use A2003, and I absolutely don't feel this as any limitation, if you have no web aspirations.

    Imb.

    Wednesday, December 23, 2015 8:22 PM
  • Thanks Imb

    The question still remains: how to capture the "start of work on that claim" in an automated fashion?  The goal is to eliminate inaccuracy associated with self-reporting.


    Bonediggler

    Wednesday, December 23, 2015 8:41 PM
  • The question still remains: how to capture the "start of work on that claim" in an automated fashion?  The goal is to eliminate inaccuracy associated with self-reporting.

    Hi Bonediggler,

    Somehow you have to store the "start of work", in the same way as you store the "end of work": you need two fields.

    How you define the "start of work" and "end of work" is an organization problem, apart form the database.

    Imb.

    Wednesday, December 23, 2015 8:59 PM
  • I agree with Imb.

    What does the business consider to be the “start of work on a claim”?
    When the claim is opened?
    When the first change takes place?

    Once you make that decision using the right event on the claim form you can code VBA to record the current time into hidden fields like (tboStartTime & tboEndTime)


    If this post answered or helped you find the answer to your question, please mark it as such for other Forum users knowledge.

    Wednesday, December 23, 2015 9:09 PM