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.aspx search forms RRS feed

  • Question

  • Can I create more than one search form on the same .aspx page in expressionweb, which each form able to submit independently?
    Saturday, November 1, 2014 3:07 PM

Answers

  • Technically, no. However, if you google "multiple forms on one aspx page" you will find several hacks to work around the restriction. This one specifically refers to ASP.NET 4.0, which is the version that came ith EW4.

    cheers,
    scott


    Please remember to "Mark as Answer" the responses that resolved your issue. It is common courtesy to recognize those who have helped you, and it also makes it easier for visitors to find the resolution later.

    • Marked as answer by Aston W Sunday, November 2, 2014 1:43 AM
    Saturday, November 1, 2014 10:02 PM
  • It's not that Expression Web is "too limited". EW is a web site design program (just like Dreamweaver). It has some ASP.NET support, but doesn't support code-behind. For that, you use VWD--in conjunction with--EW4.

    You don't "jump to the other development software", you add it to your tool box. You both for their strengths. It's like editing graphics with another program and then including them in a site designed with EW. Excel isn't "too limited" to build a relational database, it's just the wrong tool.


    A horse walks into a bar. The bartender asks "Why the long face?"

    "Because I was born into servitude and when I die my hooves will be used to make glue."

    It was at this point that the bartender realized he would not be getting a tip.

    • Edited by Bill Pearson Monday, November 3, 2014 12:18 AM
    • Marked as answer by Aston W Monday, November 3, 2014 12:38 AM
    Monday, November 3, 2014 12:17 AM
  • Aston, you and I have talked about working with my tutorials in the past. While those tutorials have been written using SQLExpress databases, the primary difference in using Access databases is that when you configure any datasource using VWD, you choose an Access database instead of a sql database, and browse to that Access database to select it (you should have it in the App_Data folder). VWD works fine with Access databases.

    You really would benefit yourself by working through those tutorials, including the ones that show you how to set up a database with a many-to-many relationship. I imagine you would have many-to-many relationship between a Trades table that lists all the trades of interest and a Cities table that lists the Cities, with the Cities table also having a one-to-many relationship to a ZipCodes table containing the zip codes.

    You don't need to be jumping around between a bunch of pages if you set things up properly. You could probably do everything on a single page. A person could (for example) select the city of interest from a dropdown list driven by a datasource using the Cities table, select the trade from a dropdown list driven by a datasource using the Trades table, and select the zipcode from a dropdown list populated the zipcodes related to the selected city.

    Those inputs (from your description of the problem) are all that is needed to present the Estimate which could be in a panel on the same page, and which becomes visible when the above selections are made.

    Everyone one of the things needed to accomplish something along these lines is in those tutorials.

    And yes, you should be using VWD to do such a job.



    ClarkNK, A.K.A. HomePage Doctor
    HomePageDoctor.com -- Database Tutorials
    Ownertrades.com -- Created with Expression, VWDExress, SQL Express, and ASP.NET
    Arvixe -- My favored web host

    • Marked as answer by Aston W Monday, November 3, 2014 4:46 AM
    Monday, November 3, 2014 3:39 AM
  • What Clark said. Given your description of your process, there is no reason to abandon your Access DB, and VWD can work with them just as easily as it can with SQL Server Express. They're even both file-based DBs—mdb for Access, mdf for SQL Server Express.

    As Clark said, all of that jumping about from page to page can probably be avoided by modifying your information architecture and structuring your search pages to take advantage of the capabilities in ASP.NET that were not available in FP. Be aware that no single one of Clark's tutorials will address everything you need to know, but that by working through them you will attain an understanding of the elements of data handling using ASP.NET that will allow you to obtain your objective.

    IIRC, some of the tutorials describe steps that are available if using VWD (Visual Web Developer) 2010, but not in other, later versions, which had certain interface elements changed or eliminated entirely. To get that version, go to this download location and download Visual Web Developer 2010 and install it, which should put you on the same page with the descriptions in the tutorials.

    cheers,
    scott


    Please remember to "Mark as Answer" the responses that resolved your issue. It is common courtesy to recognize those who have helped you, and it also makes it easier for visitors to find the resolution later.

    • Edited by paladyn Tuesday, November 4, 2014 12:13 AM
    • Marked as answer by Aston W Tuesday, November 4, 2014 2:24 AM
    Monday, November 3, 2014 11:23 PM

All replies

  • Technically, no. However, if you google "multiple forms on one aspx page" you will find several hacks to work around the restriction. This one specifically refers to ASP.NET 4.0, which is the version that came ith EW4.

    cheers,
    scott


    Please remember to "Mark as Answer" the responses that resolved your issue. It is common courtesy to recognize those who have helped you, and it also makes it easier for visitors to find the resolution later.

    • Marked as answer by Aston W Sunday, November 2, 2014 1:43 AM
    Saturday, November 1, 2014 10:02 PM
  • Thanks for the suggestion. I will try that
    Sunday, November 2, 2014 1:42 AM
  • Well, as Scott said -- technically no to the question about more than one "form" -- but --

    You can certainly do multiple independent searches on a single aspx page. A common way to do this might be where someone wants to be able to search by several different parameters, for example to search by last name, or search by state, etc.

    You might put several panels on the page, and in each panel configure a datasource, a gridview to bring up data for one of those searches, and a button to click to implement the search. Then let which panel is visible be determined by a choice the user makes regarding which type of search they want to do as, for example, from a drop-down list of search types.

    All those searches would be on a single aspx page, or "form".



    ClarkNK, A.K.A. HomePage Doctor
    HomePageDoctor.com -- Database Tutorials
    Ownertrades.com -- Created with Expression, VWDExress, SQL Express, and ASP.NET
    Arvixe -- My favored web host

    Sunday, November 2, 2014 12:49 PM
  • Scott: Thanks.

    I am currently  proceeding to replace my search and result pages from my old frontpage website (which was done using the wizard),.

    On the old FP site, there are currently 20 cities (individual html pages) each containing over 30 individual search forms. (Trade categories) where the result (trade)pages (currently in .asp) are accessed through 2 form fields, named T1 and T2)

    The parameters for the result form are fields T1(type of trade) and T2 (drop-down list with postal areas), which gets submitted to a specific trade .asp page

    For example, in the City of Toronto page, you scroll to the "carpentry" submission form, which contains the fields T! (carpentry) and T2 (a corresponding postal area within the City of Toronto)

    The fields T! and T2 are named for each of both fields throughout the one city page.

    I created a .aspx search page in my epressionweb site and set up one form on it. which submits to the same .asp page on the old FP website(Carpentry trade) and works fine (although it is still only submitting to the older .asp page pending my creation of a .aspx results page within the expressionweb site instead (I am using an access 2000 database )

    However, I tried to place a second submission form on the same .aspx page and when I named the two submission fields T1 and T2, it would not let me use the already-used names, which tells me that the new form and submission fields were still part of the one above.

    Is this something I should be doing on an .html page instead?

    I realize that expressionweb is not Frontpage, but it seems that making the transition may be easier for me this way, as I can do it using my Access database for now until I go to .sql or something else.

    I need to see if expressionweb is indeed too limited for what I want to do for right now, which I am not sure is beyond its capabilities before jumping to the other development software which was recommended a while back.

    For this particular portion of my system (for public display), I only need to search and retrieve data  without updating. I am learning how to update record field entries using .aspx pages, but I am temporarily still using other FP forms on a 2nd, FP website which work fine for right now until I get up to speed.

    So you understand the flow...

    1-The client clicks on the submission form (for a specific trade) on the larger City page

    2-The result form (currently a .asp form on a separate FP site) displays information based on the parameters set in the previous form

    3-There is a hyperlink on the results page containing a parameter field value that sends the client to a specific estimate form that corresponds with the same parameters of the original form.

    I have already created those .aspx estimate forms within the expressionweb site.

    In essence, the trail currently bounces back between both websites until I can develop the results page (,aspx) within expressionweb.

    Am I on the right (though long) track?


    Ron


    Sunday, November 2, 2014 4:04 PM
  • It's not that Expression Web is "too limited". EW is a web site design program (just like Dreamweaver). It has some ASP.NET support, but doesn't support code-behind. For that, you use VWD--in conjunction with--EW4.

    You don't "jump to the other development software", you add it to your tool box. You both for their strengths. It's like editing graphics with another program and then including them in a site designed with EW. Excel isn't "too limited" to build a relational database, it's just the wrong tool.


    A horse walks into a bar. The bartender asks "Why the long face?"

    "Because I was born into servitude and when I die my hooves will be used to make glue."

    It was at this point that the bartender realized he would not be getting a tip.

    • Edited by Bill Pearson Monday, November 3, 2014 12:18 AM
    • Marked as answer by Aston W Monday, November 3, 2014 12:38 AM
    Monday, November 3, 2014 12:17 AM
  • Thanks, Bill. That makes sense.

    I think the issue I ran into when I checked out VWD was that it either didn't work well with Access databases (.mdb) or favoured using .sql in the turorial.

    This might be why I hesitated the last time I checked out VWD, as I am not ready to transition to .sql yet.

    However, I am going to go through VWD again and see if I can figure out how to use it to finally replace my existing FP DB forms system.

    Thanks for the help

    Ron




    Monday, November 3, 2014 12:38 AM
  • Aston, you and I have talked about working with my tutorials in the past. While those tutorials have been written using SQLExpress databases, the primary difference in using Access databases is that when you configure any datasource using VWD, you choose an Access database instead of a sql database, and browse to that Access database to select it (you should have it in the App_Data folder). VWD works fine with Access databases.

    You really would benefit yourself by working through those tutorials, including the ones that show you how to set up a database with a many-to-many relationship. I imagine you would have many-to-many relationship between a Trades table that lists all the trades of interest and a Cities table that lists the Cities, with the Cities table also having a one-to-many relationship to a ZipCodes table containing the zip codes.

    You don't need to be jumping around between a bunch of pages if you set things up properly. You could probably do everything on a single page. A person could (for example) select the city of interest from a dropdown list driven by a datasource using the Cities table, select the trade from a dropdown list driven by a datasource using the Trades table, and select the zipcode from a dropdown list populated the zipcodes related to the selected city.

    Those inputs (from your description of the problem) are all that is needed to present the Estimate which could be in a panel on the same page, and which becomes visible when the above selections are made.

    Everyone one of the things needed to accomplish something along these lines is in those tutorials.

    And yes, you should be using VWD to do such a job.



    ClarkNK, A.K.A. HomePage Doctor
    HomePageDoctor.com -- Database Tutorials
    Ownertrades.com -- Created with Expression, VWDExress, SQL Express, and ASP.NET
    Arvixe -- My favored web host

    • Marked as answer by Aston W Monday, November 3, 2014 4:46 AM
    Monday, November 3, 2014 3:39 AM
  • What Clark said. Given your description of your process, there is no reason to abandon your Access DB, and VWD can work with them just as easily as it can with SQL Server Express. They're even both file-based DBs—mdb for Access, mdf for SQL Server Express.

    As Clark said, all of that jumping about from page to page can probably be avoided by modifying your information architecture and structuring your search pages to take advantage of the capabilities in ASP.NET that were not available in FP. Be aware that no single one of Clark's tutorials will address everything you need to know, but that by working through them you will attain an understanding of the elements of data handling using ASP.NET that will allow you to obtain your objective.

    IIRC, some of the tutorials describe steps that are available if using VWD (Visual Web Developer) 2010, but not in other, later versions, which had certain interface elements changed or eliminated entirely. To get that version, go to this download location and download Visual Web Developer 2010 and install it, which should put you on the same page with the descriptions in the tutorials.

    cheers,
    scott


    Please remember to "Mark as Answer" the responses that resolved your issue. It is common courtesy to recognize those who have helped you, and it also makes it easier for visitors to find the resolution later.

    • Edited by paladyn Tuesday, November 4, 2014 12:13 AM
    • Marked as answer by Aston W Tuesday, November 4, 2014 2:24 AM
    Monday, November 3, 2014 11:23 PM
  • Scott: Thanks for the further help. I have already downloaded VWD Express 2010 and have started to go back and forth between Clark's tutorial after setting up my Access 2000 database to work with it. Hopefully, I will be on my way with it all shortly.

    Sincerely,

    Ron

    Tuesday, November 4, 2014 2:24 AM
  • By the way, while I'm very late to the party, you don't need two forms to have two searches on one page. All you need is to only send / only use the information you need for each search.  Since you didn't mention how you had constructed your search, the details would vary.  But it's a very common thing in asp.net to have multiple buttons on a page, each of which does different things, either while remaining on the page itself, or by posting back to a different page and sending information to that page in query parameters, in the forms collection, etc..
    Tuesday, November 4, 2014 2:23 PM