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Most Popular Spanish, Portugal(Brazil) & French Collations RRS feed

Answers

  • For French, I use Latin1_General.

    When importing files, I encode those as "unicode codepage 1200" to avoid losing accents.

    I would be curious to know what other users uses.  Maybe there is a way not to lose accents using utf 8 which seems to be the default for most of my applications.

    Hope this helps.

    • Marked as answer by Kalman Toth Monday, November 26, 2012 7:47 PM
    Thursday, November 22, 2012 10:44 PM
  • You need to check with a national standards organization, and even then you might not get a single answer.

    The Spanish Academy used to sort  'ch' and 'll' as separate letters, but that is not the case any more. Mexican Spanish uses 'X' but standard Spanish does not.

    Germany had a DIN standard, an IBM standard and an Austrian Dictionary collation. They went thru a massive spelling change and handle umlats differently now.

    The Nordic countries have a "Nordic Newspaper" collation.

    Portugal and Brazilian are drifting apart linguistically, but they have the 1990 Portuguese Language Orthographic Agreement in place. see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portuguese_alphabet 

    I would go with the Microsoft defaults and blame Bill Gates if you get in trouble :)


    --CELKO-- Books in Celko Series for Morgan-Kaufmann Publishing: Analytics and OLAP in SQL / Data and Databases: Concepts in Practice Data / Measurements and Standards in SQL SQL for Smarties / SQL Programming Style / SQL Puzzles and Answers / Thinking in Sets / Trees and Hierarchies in SQL

    • Proposed as answer by Naomi N Monday, November 26, 2012 4:12 PM
    • Marked as answer by Kalman Toth Monday, November 26, 2012 7:47 PM
    Monday, November 26, 2012 3:17 PM
  • I find it peculiar that someone "married" Finnish & Swedish, even though Finnish is related to Hungarian and not related to Swedish?

    Yeah, but Sweden and Finland were "married" for 500 years, and Finnish ortography is developed from Swedish. And don't forget that Swedish is the only language that has official status in all parts of Finland!

    In a similar vein there is a Danish_Greenlandic_100 collation.


    Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, esquel@sommarskog.se
    • Marked as answer by Kalman Toth Monday, November 26, 2012 7:47 PM
    Monday, November 26, 2012 3:34 PM
  • Hi Kalman,

    Please refer to the following document:

    Collation Settings in Setup:
    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms143508%28v=sql.105%29


    Allen Li
    TechNet Community Support

    • Marked as answer by Kalman Toth Monday, November 26, 2012 7:47 PM
    Friday, November 23, 2012 2:17 AM
  • The differences between French and Latin1_General are of the subtle nature, that maybe not all French-speaking people may notice. To see the difference, try the words cote, coté, côte and côté.

    Then again, I encounter clients here in Sweden that uses SQL_Latin1_General_CI_AS...


    Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, esquel@sommarskog.se
    • Marked as answer by Kalman Toth Monday, November 26, 2012 7:47 PM
    Monday, November 26, 2012 2:42 PM
  • How about Swedish & Norwegian? Swedish & Danish? Aren't they close?

    They are close, but ortography and alphabet are different. The last three letters in the Swedish alphabet is åäö, the last three in Danish and Norwegian are æøå. And before you think that this could be combined, you should know that æ and ä are the same, and so are ø and ö.

    Interesting enough, Danish and Norwegian shared collations originally, but have parted ways in the new 100 collations. I don't know why, but there may be a subtle difference.

    In any case, what matters is ortography and alphabet. Whether the languages are related are completely immaterial. But a common history helps. For instance, there are no Basque collations, and from what I know about Basque, it should get along just fine with Modern_Spanish. In the same vein, I suspect that there more than one Amerindian language that can use Latin1_General, because it shares ortography with English.


    Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, esquel@sommarskog.se
    • Marked as answer by Kalman Toth Tuesday, November 27, 2012 12:35 AM
    Monday, November 26, 2012 11:07 PM

All replies

  • For French, I use Latin1_General.

    When importing files, I encode those as "unicode codepage 1200" to avoid losing accents.

    I would be curious to know what other users uses.  Maybe there is a way not to lose accents using utf 8 which seems to be the default for most of my applications.

    Hope this helps.

    • Marked as answer by Kalman Toth Monday, November 26, 2012 7:47 PM
    Thursday, November 22, 2012 10:44 PM
  • Hi Kalman,

    Please refer to the following document:

    Collation Settings in Setup:
    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms143508%28v=sql.105%29


    Allen Li
    TechNet Community Support

    • Marked as answer by Kalman Toth Monday, November 26, 2012 7:47 PM
    Friday, November 23, 2012 2:17 AM
  • Thanks Antoine & Allen. See conflict?

    Antoine F: For French, I use Latin1_General

    The Collation Setting document shows:

    French (France) 0x040c 0x040c French_CI_AS


    Kalman Toth SQL 2008 GRAND SLAM
    New Book: Beginner Database Design & SQL Programming Using Microsoft SQL Server 2012



    • Edited by Kalman Toth Monday, November 26, 2012 2:06 PM
    Monday, November 26, 2012 2:01 PM
  • The differences between French and Latin1_General are of the subtle nature, that maybe not all French-speaking people may notice. To see the difference, try the words cote, coté, côte and côté.

    Then again, I encounter clients here in Sweden that uses SQL_Latin1_General_CI_AS...


    Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, esquel@sommarskog.se
    • Marked as answer by Kalman Toth Monday, November 26, 2012 7:47 PM
    Monday, November 26, 2012 2:42 PM
  • Then again, I encounter clients here in Sweden that uses SQL_Latin1_General_CI_AS...


    Thanks Erland. According the above document Swedes should be using:

    Swedish (Sweden) 0x041d  0x040b Finnish_Swedish_CI_AS ?

    I find it peculiar that someone "married" Finnish & Swedish, even though Finnish is related to Hungarian and not related to Swedish?

    Reference:

    North Germanic Scandinavian
    Linguistic classification: Indo-European Germanic

    Subdivisions:
    Icelandic
    Faroese
    Norwegian
    Danish
    Swedish


    Kalman Toth SQL 2008 GRAND SLAM
    New Book: Beginner Database Design & SQL Programming Using Microsoft SQL Server 2012


    • Edited by Kalman Toth Monday, November 26, 2012 3:32 PM
    Monday, November 26, 2012 3:08 PM
  • You need to check with a national standards organization, and even then you might not get a single answer.

    The Spanish Academy used to sort  'ch' and 'll' as separate letters, but that is not the case any more. Mexican Spanish uses 'X' but standard Spanish does not.

    Germany had a DIN standard, an IBM standard and an Austrian Dictionary collation. They went thru a massive spelling change and handle umlats differently now.

    The Nordic countries have a "Nordic Newspaper" collation.

    Portugal and Brazilian are drifting apart linguistically, but they have the 1990 Portuguese Language Orthographic Agreement in place. see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portuguese_alphabet 

    I would go with the Microsoft defaults and blame Bill Gates if you get in trouble :)


    --CELKO-- Books in Celko Series for Morgan-Kaufmann Publishing: Analytics and OLAP in SQL / Data and Databases: Concepts in Practice Data / Measurements and Standards in SQL SQL for Smarties / SQL Programming Style / SQL Puzzles and Answers / Thinking in Sets / Trees and Hierarchies in SQL

    • Proposed as answer by Naomi N Monday, November 26, 2012 4:12 PM
    • Marked as answer by Kalman Toth Monday, November 26, 2012 7:47 PM
    Monday, November 26, 2012 3:17 PM
  • I find it peculiar that someone "married" Finnish & Swedish, even though Finnish is related to Hungarian and not related to Swedish?

    Yeah, but Sweden and Finland were "married" for 500 years, and Finnish ortography is developed from Swedish. And don't forget that Swedish is the only language that has official status in all parts of Finland!

    In a similar vein there is a Danish_Greenlandic_100 collation.


    Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, esquel@sommarskog.se
    • Marked as answer by Kalman Toth Monday, November 26, 2012 7:47 PM
    Monday, November 26, 2012 3:34 PM
  • How about Swedish & Norwegian? Swedish & Danish? Aren't they close?

    Kalman Toth SQL 2008 GRAND SLAM
    New Book: Beginner Database Design & SQL Programming Using Microsoft SQL Server 2012

    Monday, November 26, 2012 3:38 PM
  • How about Swedish & Norwegian? Swedish & Danish? Aren't they close?

    They are close, but ortography and alphabet are different. The last three letters in the Swedish alphabet is åäö, the last three in Danish and Norwegian are æøå. And before you think that this could be combined, you should know that æ and ä are the same, and so are ø and ö.

    Interesting enough, Danish and Norwegian shared collations originally, but have parted ways in the new 100 collations. I don't know why, but there may be a subtle difference.

    In any case, what matters is ortography and alphabet. Whether the languages are related are completely immaterial. But a common history helps. For instance, there are no Basque collations, and from what I know about Basque, it should get along just fine with Modern_Spanish. In the same vein, I suspect that there more than one Amerindian language that can use Latin1_General, because it shares ortography with English.


    Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, esquel@sommarskog.se
    • Marked as answer by Kalman Toth Tuesday, November 27, 2012 12:35 AM
    Monday, November 26, 2012 11:07 PM