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English (UK) Language missing RRS feed

  • General discussion

  • Why is English (UK) missing from many (most) MS forums ?

    For example - THIS one (look at the top of the page and try to set the language to English (UK)

    And also in many (most) installations of software.

    Please add it...


    Monday, November 12, 2018 1:39 PM

All replies

  • Humm... don't know the others, but THIS forum does support English (UK). Just press the link on the lower left corner.

    Just checked and found SQLServer forum and Technet forum skin does not have this option.

    However you can help change the skin yourself:

    To use Technet skin, the URL is in the following form:

    https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/home?forum=suggest

    To use the SQL Server forum skin, the URL will look like this:

    https://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/sqlserver/en-US/home?forum=suggest

    And for Visual Studio forum that does have this language selection link, change the beginning of URL to this form:

    https://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/vstudio/en-US/home?forum=suggest

    And of course, the basic MSDN forum which also contains language selection link at the lower left corner:

    https://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/home?forum=suggest

    There could be others, but except the web technology related https://forums.asp.net/ and https://forums.iis.net/ , for most microsoft forums you can change the skin-to-use yourself like this.




    • Edited by cheong00 Tuesday, November 13, 2018 9:53 AM
    Tuesday, November 13, 2018 2:18 AM
  • This is all that I can see on Technet forums - surely a missight ?

    • Edited by Formula XX Tuesday, November 13, 2018 9:30 AM
    Tuesday, November 13, 2018 9:29 AM
  • Much like what I said in the previous reply, you can change the "forum skin" selection to access the "full page language selection page".

    Btw, even if you select "United Kingdom (English)" there, you'll be redirected to "en-US" site (Perheps the wordings difference not significant enough for different localization files). So there's not much different in doing it.

    Tuesday, November 13, 2018 9:57 AM
  • Much like what I said in the previous reply, you can change the "forum skin" selection to access the "full page language selection page".

    Btw, even if you select "United Kingdom (English)" there, you'll be redirected to "en-US" site (Perheps the wordings difference not significant enough for different localization files). So there's not much different in doing it.

    There IS a massive difference between spellings in UK and USA but also meanings of words

    eg)

    Chat up
    In the U.K., this verb means “to hit on” or “talk flirtatiously” with someone. In the U.S. however, it is used quite frequently to mean having a light, casual conversation or talking positively about something in order to persuade others to like it or approve of it. Imagine my confusion when a friend once said she would “chat me up,” meaning that she would say nice things about me.

    Dear
    I once lost an earring at a party and was searching for it with no luck. “Oh no,” said my host, “Was it dear?” Given that this can mean “expensive” in the U.K., it struck me as a fairly odd question in the circumstances, until my husband translated, “She means did you really like it? Was it treasured?”

    Favor (us) / Favour (uk)
    When my eldest was a baby, someone asked whether she favored my husband or me. My rambling answer was “Well, she spends more time with me so she’s probably more attached to me right now, but I wouldn’t say she necessarily prefers me.” Doubtless the other person was thinking, “What is this idiot Brit talking about?” since “favor” in this situation meant “to bear a physical resemblance.” Facepalm.

    Knock up
    To my mother’s eternal embarrassment, on her first visit here, she turned to my brand new American husband and asked if he wouldn’t mind knocking her up in the morning. Fortunately he had lived in London and knew she meant, “Please knock on my door to wake me up,” rather than er, well…

    To nurse
    It wouldn’t be at all out of place in the U.K. for a mother to hand her baby over to a friend or relative with the words “Would you mind nursing Charlie for a second?” The British meaning, vis à vis babies, is to hold and cuddle them rather than to breastfeed them. (I’m just glad I learned that one before I had children!)

    Pissed
    When my husband first landed in London he was taken to lunch by a rather hung-over colleague. “We all got a bit pissed last night,” he explained. “And then what happened?” my husband asked. “Well, nothing, we just got pissed,” came the reply. And so it went on; not sure if they ever realized that “pissed” in the U.S means “annoyed” or “angry,” while in the U.K. it means “inebriated.”

    Quite
    The misuse of this word can really convey the wrong meaning. If a Brit describes something as quite good, it means s/he thought it was “just OK.” When an American uses the word, it’s usually signifies the opposite – the speaker was really pleased or impressed with something. Brits should probably use “so-so” or “meh” to indicate being underwhelmed.

    Smart
    It always brought a smile to Americans’ faces when my oldest son used to protest at wearing a smart (collared) shirt. Calling someone smart in the U.K. can mean intelligent or quick-witted but is just as likely to mean well-dressed. Interestingly though, there’s a Smart Car on both sides of the Pond.

    Tuesday, November 13, 2018 10:33 AM
  • I mean, not much difference in the "UI text".

    If over 98% of words in the localization file are the same, except "color/colour" and "behavior/behaviour", I don't think there are other difference in the localization text file. And these difference in spelling are quite well understood by people in both countries and very unlikely to case any usablity issue.

    • Edited by cheong00 Wednesday, November 14, 2018 12:58 AM
    Wednesday, November 14, 2018 12:57 AM
  • I mean, not much difference in the "UI text".

    If over 98% of words in the localization file are the same, except "color/colour" and "behavior/behaviour", I don't think there are other difference in the localization text file. And these difference in spelling are quite well understood by people in both countries and very unlikely to case any usablity issue.

    Sorry - so you are claiming that the fact that THE MOTHER LANGUAGE is missing (Even Irish & Australan English is available as an option) is unimportant - because it not much different to US (English) ?

    Well Chinese and Japanese and Korean are similar - so why have 3 different options for them ??

    Come on MS - see sense and add UK English on every option page

    Wednesday, November 14, 2018 2:38 PM
  • No. Chinese and Japanese are not similar at all(there are only about 2000 Kanji use in Japan, some in Simplified Chinese, some in Traditional Chinese, and some have Glyphs that don't exists in both languages. Btw, most computing related words in Japanese are in Katakana that roughly resembles phonetic notation of corresponding word in English, so in some sense - when menu item and so on contain only noun and therefore has no grammar - it would be closer to English than Chinese in the context of this discussion), and Chinese and Korean are completely different, even if you only limit the comparison on UI text.

    And btw, the text (and I don't mean the glyphs or how it's write, but the character itself) of Traditional Chinese and Simplified Chinese for computer related term also have significant difference because the "early adopter" of computer related technologies are from two group of people that have literally no coordination between one another. So there is different UI setting for both locale.

    Sidetalk: I live in Hong Kong which is part of China. I can read computing books from Taiwan, but have hard time reading computing book from China even though I can read both Simplified Chinese and Traditional Chinese. That's because the terms they use are completely different.

    We use English to teach computing related subjects in schools and university, but when we want to find reference books in Chinese so it is easier to understand for us, we read books from Taiwan because both places uses Traditional Chinese.


    • Edited by cheong00 Thursday, November 15, 2018 3:23 AM
    Thursday, November 15, 2018 3:12 AM