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Metro LoB

    General discussion

  • I'm curious. Is anyone working on an LoB Metro app?

    I'd love to see how dense we can pack a Metro app with controls and still be Metro.

    Does anyone have any information they can share/link that can be used in designing dense Metro?


    • Edited by CraigLaurin Saturday, September 17, 2011 1:01 PM
    Saturday, September 17, 2011 1:01 PM

All replies

  • Densely packed controls is almost the antithesis of the Metro design language. The aim is, as far as possible, to be chromeless and to put content front and center of the application. I'd strongly recommend watching the Build sessions on metro app design (particularly the one by Jensen Harris) to get a better idea of how Metro apps should look and feel.
    Sunday, September 18, 2011 10:34 PM
  • What about the control panel? It seems to be rich in controls yet sparse and simple. I am very impressed and would love to see all control panels move that way. Maybe even take legacy ones and have them show up embedded in the right side
    Monday, September 19, 2011 4:22 PM
  • You can go to the legacy one by clicking More Settings in the left list of the Metro's control panel; or clicking Control Panel in the Windows Explorer's Ribbon.
    Monday, September 19, 2011 4:39 PM
  • Densely packed controls is almost the antithesis of the Metro design language. The aim is, as far as possible, to be chromeless and to put content front and center of the application. I'd strongly recommend watching the Build sessions on metro app design (particularly the one by Jensen Harris) to get a better idea of how Metro apps should look and feel.


    Yes, dense can be too dense. My question is how dense can we get and still be Metro? Getting a feel for this boundry is going to be critical.

     

    The first tool I see in accomplishing dense is to put controls in context sensitive menus as the primary means of functionality and put controls in the transparent chrome very sparingly.


    • Edited by CraigLaurin Monday, September 19, 2011 4:58 PM
    Monday, September 19, 2011 4:51 PM
  • yes but that launches the traditional control panel window. Imaging if that was a list on the left with the area on the right containing the dialog that comes up unchanged to support legacy as the dialogs are turned into Metro like entries to keep you in metro
    Monday, September 19, 2011 7:34 PM
  • >>Yes, dense can be too dense. My question is how dense can we get and still be Metro?

    I'ld say that once you notice yourself becoming carefull when using touch to not trigger to wrong command - it's too dense.

    Personally, I'ld also consider the complexity of the application in question.

    Just look at the options/capabilities Metro IE10 has compared to Desktop IE10.  It's quite obvious that metro applications will, by design, never achieve the level of complexity that is possible on a desktop with mouse and keyboard.

    Friday, September 23, 2011 10:43 AM
  • I'm curious. Is anyone working on an LoB Metro app?

    I'd love to see how dense we can pack a Metro app with controls and still be Metro.

    Does anyone have any information they can share/link that can be used in designing dense Metro?



    Hi Craig!

    I'm one of the interns from //build; my project was a proof-of-concept LOB app for Northwind Car Rentals, Inc. We worked a lot with the Metro-style designers to enable our key scenarios & not break Metro - I can't speak on the official best practices, but I'd be happy to answer any specific questions you may have with things we learned during our summer.

    In very very short terms (using onscreen keyboard since I don't have the hardware one to hand): We didn't go for increased density as much as increased "surface area" with semantic zoom / jump viewers to make moving through the surface area a very fast process. You might be able to make a dense app, but we found a more spread out app felt easier and wasn't slower to use. Also, the new controls meant we didn't need to spend lots of time styling and creating new pages when we felt like one was appropriate - the combination of easy development and user navigation meant we didn't really miss not having lots of dense controls.

    This may not be what you were looking for - we didn't really look at density as something we wanted to pursue. However, we did manage to put together a LOB app which we think is Metro-style and efficient for Northwind employees. If you have any specific questions, feel free to ask them & I'll be happy to answer what I can.

    Monday, October 3, 2011 3:32 PM
  • Hi Ted,

    Did you use any Data Grids for your car rental app. If so can you share screenshots/Mockup's on how you cracked it without breaking Metro Style design.

    Currently I am researching and trying to come up with some early mockup's for a Financial App in Metro style.

     


    Friday, October 7, 2011 10:57 AM
  • Ted, can you share some screenshots of your LOB app? I think the fact that you have worked alongside the Metro-style designers or your app would give us an idea of how they see their ideas realised into a business app. 
    Acer W500 tablet & dock, New 'works' Lenovo laptop Too much apple stuff. Remember: A Developer Preview is just that, a preview for developers - not everything will work 'just right' on day 1.
    Sunday, October 9, 2011 12:52 PM
  • Hi,

    I still can't find any sample of a serious Metro LOB app out there... Has anyone a sample design or some mockup to share ?

    Thanks

    Gael

    Friday, May 18, 2012 9:33 AM
  • Hi Ted!

    Could you zap me here?

    http://blogs.msnd.com/jpsanders/contact.aspx

    -Jeff


    Jeff Sanders (MSFT)

    Monday, May 21, 2012 2:52 PM
    Moderator
  • Hi Ted!

    I would also love to see some screenshots of your work. Any chance you could share that with us? Thank you.

    Wednesday, May 30, 2012 11:41 AM
  • About time MSFT releases some LoB style app screenshots.
    Thursday, May 31, 2012 4:20 PM