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Universal Apps -vs- Windows Store Apps

    Question

  • Writing in C++ XAML and DirectX and targeting a Universal App though the main target is full up Windows 10.  I am wondering what has changed in Universal Apps (if anything).

    I would Love to have a Universal App over a desktop app.  However I have some odd requirements and I am wondering if these are accounted for in Universal apps:

    1) The device is multimon and I need the app on both screens.  The screens are 1920x1080 and stacked on top of each other.   A single desktop app is currently doing this by running in 1920x2160 resolution.

    Q1) Can a Universal app scale to 1920x2160?

    Q2) Can a universal app have two windows.  One on each screen.

    My questions are unusual and I am fine if the answer is wait until \\build conference is over..


    Tuesday, April 28, 2015 8:56 PM

Answers

  • Windows 8.1 apps can have multiple windows on separate screens. This isn't new for Windows 10.

    See the Multiple Views Sample

    • Marked as answer by starfish6077 Thursday, April 30, 2015 4:25 PM
    Wednesday, April 29, 2015 5:11 AM
    Moderator
  • The app create a new view by calling CreateNewView. Typically (and in the sample) this is in response to user input requesting the new view.

    There is no way for the app to force the window to the other screen. The user has ultimate choice over that.

    • Marked as answer by starfish6077 Thursday, April 30, 2015 4:25 PM
    Wednesday, April 29, 2015 9:24 PM
    Moderator
  • I've been recommending that session frequently. Users expect multiple windows in the desktop environment, so it's really important that devs understand how to do that.

    The app can't force itself on the user as you're looking for, but kiosk modes are about the system configuration forcing app behavior. It may be possible for system configuration to control the layout as you'd like. Since this is a system configuration question rather than a dev question you'll be better off asking about kiosk specific configurations  in the TechNet forums or in the embedded Windows forums.

    • Marked as answer by starfish6077 Thursday, April 30, 2015 4:25 PM
    Thursday, April 30, 2015 5:15 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Windows 8.1 apps can have multiple windows on separate screens. This isn't new for Windows 10.

    See the Multiple Views Sample

    • Marked as answer by starfish6077 Thursday, April 30, 2015 4:25 PM
    Wednesday, April 29, 2015 5:11 AM
    Moderator
  • Thanks Rob,

    This is similar to a dual screen KIOSK.  I loaded up the sample and it was not obvious how to get the second Window to the other screen.  Likely user error.  Also the sample mentions that the user initiates the creation of the second Window and I am hoping to get this second window at system boot without user interaction.  Thoughts?

    Wednesday, April 29, 2015 5:07 PM
  • The app create a new view by calling CreateNewView. Typically (and in the sample) this is in response to user input requesting the new view.

    There is no way for the app to force the window to the other screen. The user has ultimate choice over that.

    • Marked as answer by starfish6077 Thursday, April 30, 2015 4:25 PM
    Wednesday, April 29, 2015 9:24 PM
    Moderator
  • Thanks again Rob,

    Looking forward to the below session (I hope it gets video taped.).  Any thoughts on:

    "This session will cover an overview of the Windows navigation model, taking those concepts and showing how this is built from the basics up to multi-window applications running in both immersive and desktop mode."

    Full link and more context below.  Does this mean my Universal App can have a desktop mode much like IE?  Do I need to wait for the \\build session?  

    Our use is a KIOSK with two screens and the user will not be able to move the Windows (Or even know they are running Windows).

    http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/Build/2015/3-779

    Navigation and Windowing in Universal Windows Apps

    In Windows 10, your creation can end up running on anything from a highly specialized hardware with limited user-interaction displaying only one application view at a time (such as a fitness band), to a general purpose system with touch, mouse, keyboard, and high-DPI monitors displaying multiple applications and application views simultaneously. Throughout this world the user expects an intuitive and familiar model for not only navigating inside your app but also for navigating between apps. This session will cover an overview of the Windows navigation model, taking those concepts and showing how this is built from the basics up to multi-window applications running in both immersive and desktop mode.

    Thursday, April 30, 2015 12:14 AM
  • I've been recommending that session frequently. Users expect multiple windows in the desktop environment, so it's really important that devs understand how to do that.

    The app can't force itself on the user as you're looking for, but kiosk modes are about the system configuration forcing app behavior. It may be possible for system configuration to control the layout as you'd like. Since this is a system configuration question rather than a dev question you'll be better off asking about kiosk specific configurations  in the TechNet forums or in the embedded Windows forums.

    • Marked as answer by starfish6077 Thursday, April 30, 2015 4:25 PM
    Thursday, April 30, 2015 5:15 AM
    Moderator
  • Thanks Rob,

    The Multiple Views sample is working great.  Off to the Embedded Windows forum.  :-)

    Thursday, April 30, 2015 4:26 PM