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Why can't an application run in both full screen and desktop mode?

    Question

  • Can someone from windows please explain why one application cannot run in desktop and full screens modes? Office has this capability today and so does acrobat reader. Even Apple's desktop OS has the same capability.

    Did your desinger not think about this approach? Were they not aware of word, adobe, apple os?

    How can you make such blunders and hope to be successful?

    Saturday, November 12, 2011 8:27 PM

Answers

  • Yes, you're reaching the grim realization the rest of us expecting serious things from Windows 8 have.  But ours is not to reason why...

    Microsoft sees Apple making big bucks skimming a few percent off every App Store sale and wants to do that too, with sales quantities of BILLIONS.

    It's not hard to see why they're pushing Metro, even if it means moving Microsoft out of the serious operating system business.   It's business, baby!

    Look into Microsoft's eyes...  You're supposed to want to develop only Metro apps from now on.

    Regarding the "stitching"...  We may be okay for one more version or so...   We can reasonably expect the ClassicShell project to give us a decent "stay on the desktop" Start button, even if Microsoft kills the Red Pill option.  And you just KNOW someone's going to find a way to wrap Metro apps with enough stuff to put them in Windows.

    In fact, the Tablet Simulator app provided with Windows 8 by Microsoft uses Virtualization Technology, I believe, and puts Metro apps in windows now...

    -Noel



    • Edited by Noel Carboni Sunday, November 13, 2011 9:41 PM
    • Marked as answer by surya_g Tuesday, November 15, 2011 5:35 AM
    Sunday, November 13, 2011 9:29 PM

All replies

  • Can someone from windows please explain why one application cannot run in desktop and full screens modes? Office has this capability today and so does acrobat reader. Even Apple's desktop OS has the same capability.
    If you are asking if a normal desktop app could run as a metro app, this is not possible, because Metro apps have a completely different architecture.
     
    If you are asking why a desktop app cannot run full-screen on the desktop, this capability is controlled by the individual application. Some applications have this feature (often activated by F11) and some do not.
     

    David Wilkinson | Visual C++ MVP
    Saturday, November 12, 2011 9:03 PM
  • The users don't care if underlying technology is metro, gastro, shitro or win32tro. They don't care about implementation, they care about experience.

    The point is to be able to run same application in both modes. Not an application specific way but consistent way. Right now application developer would have to develop two applications, one for full screen, another for desktop. Users would have to make a choice or download two applications. The whole experience seems to be two worlds i.e. tablets and desktop forcibly stitched together in an incoherent mess. In the most humblest words, this is what I call cluster-fuuuuuuccck!

    Sunday, November 13, 2011 6:32 PM
  • Yes, you're reaching the grim realization the rest of us expecting serious things from Windows 8 have.  But ours is not to reason why...

    Microsoft sees Apple making big bucks skimming a few percent off every App Store sale and wants to do that too, with sales quantities of BILLIONS.

    It's not hard to see why they're pushing Metro, even if it means moving Microsoft out of the serious operating system business.   It's business, baby!

    Look into Microsoft's eyes...  You're supposed to want to develop only Metro apps from now on.

    Regarding the "stitching"...  We may be okay for one more version or so...   We can reasonably expect the ClassicShell project to give us a decent "stay on the desktop" Start button, even if Microsoft kills the Red Pill option.  And you just KNOW someone's going to find a way to wrap Metro apps with enough stuff to put them in Windows.

    In fact, the Tablet Simulator app provided with Windows 8 by Microsoft uses Virtualization Technology, I believe, and puts Metro apps in windows now...

    -Noel



    • Edited by Noel Carboni Sunday, November 13, 2011 9:41 PM
    • Marked as answer by surya_g Tuesday, November 15, 2011 5:35 AM
    Sunday, November 13, 2011 9:29 PM
  • Applications cannot be run in both desktop mode and Metro mode because that's how Windows is designed. Desktop apps will run in the desktop and Metro-style apps will run in the Metro UI. There is no way to change this, unless there is extra software released by a third party that I am unaware of.

    I'm hoping that Microsoft will change this behavior by the time Windows 8 ships. On the desktop, the Metro-style UI is bad, but there needs to be a way to run Metro apps in a window. On a tablet, the desktop UI is hard to use, and there needs to be a way to use desktop apps like full-screen Metro-style apps, where possible. This would be more of a "no compromises" setup the Microsoft's current plan, which seems to be full of trade-offs.

    While the Tablet Simulator that Noel Carboni mentioned does let Metro run in a window, it is essentially a virtualized version of the entire OS and is probably not the answer you're looking for.

    Sunday, November 13, 2011 9:41 PM
  • Applications cannot be run in both desktop mode and Metro mode because that's how Windows is designed. Desktop apps will run in the desktop and Metro-style apps will run in the Metro UI. There is no way to change this, unless there is extra software released by a third party that I am unaware of.

    This makes me sad. This is a mega blunder and it is going to make 8 another vista.
    Tuesday, November 15, 2011 5:37 AM