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Could Azure free of charge for personal use forever? RRS feed

  • Question

  • - OpenShift (by Red Hat)
       https://openshift.redhat.com/app/

    - dotCloud
       https://www.dotcloud.com/

    - AppFog
       https://www.appfog.com/

    - App Engine (by Google)
       https://developers.google.com/appengine/

    Like these PaaS, they are free for personal use just with traffic and storage limit.

    I used to be a Microsoft fan (I hope I am still its fan now;)), so I want to use its Cloud Service such as Azure for development and deployment for personal use.

    But I don't want to pay for any money before I really have estimation that I could have earned money from applications/services developed by me --- you know, the running cost.

    What I find out is that it is not free for personal use as it has 90(?) days trial time.

    I am not sure that it must have trial time, so is there anyone can tell that whether I could use it like other PaaS free of charge just with traffic and storage limit?

    Thank you.


    Learing from work, doing career with passion!

    • Edited by Tech_me Sunday, February 10, 2013 7:37 AM
    Sunday, February 10, 2013 7:36 AM

Answers

  • I don't think it works that way :). Your trial will expire after 90 days whether you use it or not.
    • Marked as answer by Tech_me Saturday, February 16, 2013 2:55 AM
    Monday, February 11, 2013 7:49 AM

All replies

  • Not sure what your application requirements are, but if you're running simple websites you can run them for free using Windows Azure Websites:http://www.windowsazure.com/en-us/home/scenarios/web-sites/. It actually comes with some free quota as well for storage and traffic. However, this is obviously not PaaS but the advantage is that with almost no changes to your existing website code, you can be up and running in no time.
    Sunday, February 10, 2013 1:56 PM
  • Thanks for replies:)

    Yes, I know the site you are giving, but what I have been seeing is that it also has trial time for 90 days, isn't it?

    Well, I am a software engineer. And I want to develop some web-services (not simple wet sites) for personal use---at least now for some private use.

    So, the 'Virtual Machines' and 'Cloud Services' would be my choices if I wanted to use.

    But all of them are not free.


    Learing from work, doing career with passion!


    • Edited by Tech_me Sunday, February 10, 2013 2:13 PM
    Sunday, February 10, 2013 2:12 PM
  • That's not true. You could run up to 10 websites for free and that's not limited during the trial period. Take a look at the pricing details here: http://www.windowsazure.com/en-us/pricing/details/#header-1. There're some caveats with free websites (like you can't assign a custom DNS to a website when running under free mode), but if this is something for your personal use I think you can live with those caveats.

    Hope this helps.

    Sunday, February 10, 2013 2:22 PM
  • I really confused by its description about trial or free.

    I want to

    1. use C# or PHP or node.js at back-end programming with database functionality.

    2. use javascript and html for my front-end programming.

    3. host my web app on the air without rent server for daily, monthly or yearly pay -- I mean any pay for small personal private use which not just simple web site.

    So, can I use Azure for my purpose?


    Learing from work, doing career with passion!

    Sunday, February 10, 2013 3:21 PM
  • The answer is yes. You can use C#, PHP or Node.js for building websites. If you visit the development center on windowsazure.com, I'm sure you'll find samples for building applications using these technologies. In the end, Windows Azure provides you with a hosting environment for your applications and they support most of the commonly used development technologies including but not limited to ASP.Net, Java, PHP, and node.js.

    Hope this helps.

    Sunday, February 10, 2013 4:14 PM
  • Hi, Gaurav Mantri

    Thanks for replying me and provide useful information time and time again!

    Yes, I will have a try to use Azure as I am still a MS fan ;) (but in other words, if I am not a MS fan, I  probably not like to use it.)

    By the way, are you a staff at MS?

    Why I wrote this topic is that I am very confused by trial or free case in the description of the Azure Official site.

    I hope MS could make more clear of it as this would be a decision by others like me would recognize it and use it.

    Thank you.


    Learing from work, doing career with passion!

    Monday, February 11, 2013 1:43 AM
  • I'm glad I was able to help you out. No, I'm not an MS employee. Just another MS fan like you who happened to like Windows Azure (a lot) and built a business around it:) (http://www.cerebrata.com).

    I can completely understand your confusion and agree that there's a lot of scope of improvement in documentation. I sincerely wish the documentation to be more clear so that people starting with Windows Azure can understand easily what Windows Azure has to offer.


    Monday, February 11, 2013 1:53 AM
  • I browsed your HP, it seems that you are doing a wonderful business which based on Azure.

    I think your services should be a small cloud world in the Azure world.

    I am not---at least now---a Azure user, but I will have a try later, thank you again.


    Learing from work, doing career with passion!

    Monday, February 11, 2013 2:36 AM
  • When I register Azure, I am here.

    Yes, in the 'Web Sites & Mobile Services', it describes as 'Stay free beyond the 90-day trial'.

    But if I was in busy day without enough time to use its other services, I think it is just a waste and a pity.

    Could I deactivate some of them which I was not currently want to use, and reactivate them again when I had enough private time back from work?


    Learing from work, doing career with passion!


    • Edited by Tech_me Monday, February 11, 2013 5:40 AM
    Monday, February 11, 2013 5:38 AM
  • You can certainly delete some services when you're not using them and recreate them when you're ready to use them to stay within your allocated quota but I'm not sure if it offsets your 90 day trial i.e. let's say you sign up for a free trial today. To the best of my knowledge, your trial will end after 90 days whether or not you use the service.

    Deleting the services when not using them is actually a very good practice to ensure that you're not running out of your allocated quota. This is very true in the case of Cloud Services where you get 750 hours / month which essentially translates to 1 small-sized VM running 24 hours a day for 30 days. Please note that Windows Azure metering is based on how long your services are deployed rather than the actual usage of the service. So if you have 2 VMs running 24 hours a day, you'll run out of your quota of 750 hours in about 15 days whether or not the service is used.

    Monday, February 11, 2013 5:46 AM
  • Yes, I know it is well knowed as 'Pay-As-You-Go', but that is in payment case.

    So as you are saying, I am not sure whether it is applying to trial case, too.

    I cannot find more detail on the trial case.


    Learing from work, doing career with passion!

    Monday, February 11, 2013 6:20 AM
  • That applies to trial as well. As long as you remain in your quota, the trial is "Free". However during your trial period if you exceed your quota for the month, your trial will be disabled for the rest of the month. Let's take cloud services for example, where you get 750 small compute hours per month. If you deploy your application in 2 small instances in a cloud service you would consume this quota in about 15 days (15 [days] x 24 [hours] x 2 [instances] = 720 hours).

    One way to circumvent is obviously to deploy the service when you need them.

    Other option would be to deploy your application in an XS instance (1 Small instance = 6 XS instances so you get 4500 XS compute hours).

    3rd option would be to remove the spending limit but in this case, anything above your allocated quota will be charged to your credit card (not something you're looking for).

    Hope this helps.

    Monday, February 11, 2013 6:34 AM
  • Oh, in your description, If I use them infrequent, I could even have a possibility for half of year or even more time as I am using less my quota?

    If so, this would be a good thing what I was expecting!


    Learing from work, doing career with passion!


    • Edited by Tech_me Monday, February 11, 2013 7:22 AM
    Monday, February 11, 2013 7:22 AM
  • I don't think it works that way :). Your trial will expire after 90 days whether you use it or not.
    • Marked as answer by Tech_me Saturday, February 16, 2013 2:55 AM
    Monday, February 11, 2013 7:49 AM