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How to create an event for Windows 8?

    Question

  • I want to know if there is a way to define a new event for Windows 8. For example after the user touches for 5 seconds in the start menu a specific program opens.

    I have built a windows metro app in c# and want to create a way for the user to open this app without the need to go and find it. Simply if the user touches with his finger anywhere on the start menu fo 5 seconds or more , I want the system to detect this behaviour and open the specified app linked with this event. 

    Is this possible?

    Wednesday, April 9, 2014 2:26 PM

Answers

  • Can you explain more about the scenario?

    Blind users will launch Windows Store apps through the start screen the same way everybody else does. The start screen provides accessibility information so screen readers can read the tiles, and it can be navigated by touch, keyboard, or mouse as the user prefers.

    If you are writing an Assistive Technology (AT) app (such as the screen reader itself) then that needs to be a desktop app. Windows Store apps are restricted from interacting with other apps, and ATs are about interacting with other apps. ATs can be set to start automatically via the Ease of Access center, and one can take over touch input system wide. Generally this will be the user's screen reader so it can read information about items that the user touches before triggering them.

    --Rob

    Thursday, April 10, 2014 1:37 AM
    Owner

All replies

  • No, there isn't such an extensibility point provided. What is the scenario you need this for. Why are the normal launching methods insufficient?

    --Rob


    Wednesday, April 9, 2014 2:43 PM
    Owner
  • Becouse the app I've built is targeted for blind people ...
    Wednesday, April 9, 2014 2:45 PM
  • Can you explain more about the scenario?

    Blind users will launch Windows Store apps through the start screen the same way everybody else does. The start screen provides accessibility information so screen readers can read the tiles, and it can be navigated by touch, keyboard, or mouse as the user prefers.

    If you are writing an Assistive Technology (AT) app (such as the screen reader itself) then that needs to be a desktop app. Windows Store apps are restricted from interacting with other apps, and ATs are about interacting with other apps. ATs can be set to start automatically via the Ease of Access center, and one can take over touch input system wide. Generally this will be the user's screen reader so it can read information about items that the user touches before triggering them.

    --Rob

    Thursday, April 10, 2014 1:37 AM
    Owner