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Adding Temperature Layer Manually RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi,

    I have a bunch of lat/long coordinates and temperature changes at those coordinates.

    I would like to add a layer to the map, to show the changes visually.  For example if change is temperature change is < 10 show dark blue, if temperature change > 10 dark red.

    Is this doable at all with AJAX api, and if so can someone point to the example.

    Thank you in advance.

    Saturday, January 5, 2013 5:36 PM

Answers

  • There are several ways to do this. The easiest way would be to use different colored pushpins to represent the temperature change. Alternatively another option would be to try and modify the heat map module found here: http://bingmapsv7modules.codeplex.com/wikipage?title=Client%20Side%20Heatmap

    http://rbrundritt.wordpress.com

    Saturday, January 5, 2013 7:22 PM
  • @Alex - That last link doesn't work for me (404 not found).

    IMHO, although you're talking about plotting temperatures, I'm not sure if you want a heatmap. A heatmap (certainly of the sort in the library linked to by Ricky) creates a continuous graphical representation of some discrete set of data. Each point in the dataset is considered to be a "source" of heat, and the heatmap portrays how the intensity of temperature diminishes the further away you get from those points.

    However, if your data is a set of points and the associated temperature change at those points, you're not really starting with a discrete distribution - it's a sample from a continuous distribution. And your data points are not sources of heat - they're just measurements of heat (or temperature change) at a given point. If you then draw a heatmap around those points you'll be inferring a (different) continuous distribution that doesn't necessarily reflect the underlying data.

    e.g. Just because a point is sandwiched between two other points doesn't imply that it would have the "average" of their temperature changes (think about a point high on a mountain that is surrounded by desert on both sides - if you only sampled the desert, your heatmap would incorrectly colour the mountain with similar intensity to the desert).

    For that reason (and without knowing anything about your particular dataset, sampling method etc.), I would tend to agree that coloured pushpins or some other symbolic markers would be more suitable for presenting your data.


    twitter: @alastaira blog: http://alastaira.wordpress.com/ | Pro Spatial with SQL Server 2012

    Monday, January 7, 2013 11:07 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • There are several ways to do this. The easiest way would be to use different colored pushpins to represent the temperature change. Alternatively another option would be to try and modify the heat map module found here: http://bingmapsv7modules.codeplex.com/wikipage?title=Client%20Side%20Heatmap

    http://rbrundritt.wordpress.com

    Saturday, January 5, 2013 7:22 PM
  • Thank you very much for reply,  I am shooting for something similar to the attached image.

    Not sure how I would accomplish that with pushpoints.  Heatmaps usually measure saturation of lat/longs, I need to visualize the change.  I will explore your suggestion further, attaching the image.

    I would like to post an image, but was blocked.

    Here is the link, I was trying ti insert.

    http://weather.weatherbug.com/NY/Larchmont-weather/weather-maps/temperature-map.html?zcode=z6286

    Saturday, January 5, 2013 8:04 PM
  • I was referring to something like this.

    http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/getfile/216365

    Any other advise?

    Monday, January 7, 2013 12:23 AM
  • @Alex - That last link doesn't work for me (404 not found).

    IMHO, although you're talking about plotting temperatures, I'm not sure if you want a heatmap. A heatmap (certainly of the sort in the library linked to by Ricky) creates a continuous graphical representation of some discrete set of data. Each point in the dataset is considered to be a "source" of heat, and the heatmap portrays how the intensity of temperature diminishes the further away you get from those points.

    However, if your data is a set of points and the associated temperature change at those points, you're not really starting with a discrete distribution - it's a sample from a continuous distribution. And your data points are not sources of heat - they're just measurements of heat (or temperature change) at a given point. If you then draw a heatmap around those points you'll be inferring a (different) continuous distribution that doesn't necessarily reflect the underlying data.

    e.g. Just because a point is sandwiched between two other points doesn't imply that it would have the "average" of their temperature changes (think about a point high on a mountain that is surrounded by desert on both sides - if you only sampled the desert, your heatmap would incorrectly colour the mountain with similar intensity to the desert).

    For that reason (and without knowing anything about your particular dataset, sampling method etc.), I would tend to agree that coloured pushpins or some other symbolic markers would be more suitable for presenting your data.


    twitter: @alastaira blog: http://alastaira.wordpress.com/ | Pro Spatial with SQL Server 2012

    Monday, January 7, 2013 11:07 AM
    Moderator
  • Thank you for reply,  I agree heatmap is not what I am looking for.  Still kind of unsure about pushpins.  I want the layer to look very smooth.

    Sorry for bad link.  Please try url below as a sample of what I am aiming for.

    http://weather.weatherbug.com/NY/Larchmont-weather/weather-maps/temperature-map.html?zcode=z6286



    Tuesday, January 8, 2013 12:34 AM

  • Wednesday, January 9, 2013 1:02 AM
  • Finally can post images!!!!!

    Image above is what I need, can someone confirm this is doable with pushpins?

    Wednesday, January 9, 2013 1:04 AM
  • Another option is to create a raster tile layer from your lat,lon,temp (csv?) data. This can be done with 3rd party gis software, which can be an expense to consider (may be some free ones out there too I think)

    I do a similar process with sea state data (sea temps, bathy, etc). If you are monitoring temp changes in near realtime, you will need to engineer a background job to  acquire data, generate imagery, and tile it up. <-- This has the potential to be a rather large programming effort and resource consumption. Not sure what your coding experience is here.

    Below is the end result of a process I have created. It sounds similar to what you are looking for.

    Saturday, February 23, 2013 5:08 PM