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  • Access to Web

    Is it possible to publish access to web without SharePoint?


    JIM.H.
    Saturday, January 21, 2012 5:53 PM

Answers

  • You can publish to office 365 now. And the affordable P1 plan supports the publishing of Access databases.

    So you don't need to buy SharePoint hosting or purchase SharePoint.

    While there are some limitations in using office 365, the "major" limitation is that of no support for web reports built in Access.

    However, the plan starts at $6 per month, and I am hard pressed to think of anything more low cost then using Access web services this way.

    Keep in mind that any web development system you adopt will require the web system to have the exact correct SQL server, the exact support for .net or php or whatever coding system you use.

    There is no such thing as "any" system in which you can publish a database and reporting system like Access (since so many systems from reporting systems to database systems etc. have to be in place and match EXACTLY your tools you used). This "exact" matching issue is not different for any other system either.

    So you cannot publish a .net application to a web server running Linux and Apache.

    So in all cases, if just the web server, the database server, and if just ONE part of this whole system is wrong then your software will not work.

    In the case of Access, you are adopting what is called "Access Web  Services". I suppose the downside is your hosting options are not as wide spread, but the upside is at least you know your application will run if such services are available.

    In a sense, how Access works is not any different than any other set of web tools – At the end of the day, your web server has to have all of the bits and parts "just" right else your application will not run. If that system is missing the reporting system, then your reports will not work.

    So there are options to do this without having to purchase SharePoint.

    Office 365 is a great low cost choice and it does support Access Web services (sans the reporting system).

    If you need web reports, you can consider something like www.accesshosting.com

    If you can get by without reports, then office 365 is really a slick setup.

    If you BinGoogle SharePoint hosting, you get TONS of SharePoint providers. The problem is not lack of providers but if you choose SharePoint, you need "enterprise edition" for Access Web services and that ends to be quite pricey.

    However, office 365 starting at $6 per month is not only one of the lowest cost options, but you get a free web site and a whole bunch of other really great things that works well with Access (you can use Access client applications and have tables linked to 365 for example).


    Albert D. Kallal  (Access MVP)
    Edmonton, Alberta Canada

    • Marked as answer by xyz_999 Wednesday, January 25, 2012 12:04 AM
    Sunday, January 22, 2012 10:35 PM

All replies

  • I'm pretty sure SharePoint is the only way to run an Access Web db.  The services are all set up on both ends, and I have no idea how you would work around those.  And, although it's been a little while since I went through them (and I didn't look for this specifically), I wouldn't be surprised to learn that attempting to do so would breach a EULA condition.

    Cheers,


    Jack D. Leach (Access MVP)
    UtterAccess Wiki: (Articles, Functions, Classes, VB7 API Declarations and more)
    Sunday, January 22, 2012 1:31 AM
  • You can publish to office 365 now. And the affordable P1 plan supports the publishing of Access databases.

    So you don't need to buy SharePoint hosting or purchase SharePoint.

    While there are some limitations in using office 365, the "major" limitation is that of no support for web reports built in Access.

    However, the plan starts at $6 per month, and I am hard pressed to think of anything more low cost then using Access web services this way.

    Keep in mind that any web development system you adopt will require the web system to have the exact correct SQL server, the exact support for .net or php or whatever coding system you use.

    There is no such thing as "any" system in which you can publish a database and reporting system like Access (since so many systems from reporting systems to database systems etc. have to be in place and match EXACTLY your tools you used). This "exact" matching issue is not different for any other system either.

    So you cannot publish a .net application to a web server running Linux and Apache.

    So in all cases, if just the web server, the database server, and if just ONE part of this whole system is wrong then your software will not work.

    In the case of Access, you are adopting what is called "Access Web  Services". I suppose the downside is your hosting options are not as wide spread, but the upside is at least you know your application will run if such services are available.

    In a sense, how Access works is not any different than any other set of web tools – At the end of the day, your web server has to have all of the bits and parts "just" right else your application will not run. If that system is missing the reporting system, then your reports will not work.

    So there are options to do this without having to purchase SharePoint.

    Office 365 is a great low cost choice and it does support Access Web services (sans the reporting system).

    If you need web reports, you can consider something like www.accesshosting.com

    If you can get by without reports, then office 365 is really a slick setup.

    If you BinGoogle SharePoint hosting, you get TONS of SharePoint providers. The problem is not lack of providers but if you choose SharePoint, you need "enterprise edition" for Access Web services and that ends to be quite pricey.

    However, office 365 starting at $6 per month is not only one of the lowest cost options, but you get a free web site and a whole bunch of other really great things that works well with Access (you can use Access client applications and have tables linked to 365 for example).


    Albert D. Kallal  (Access MVP)
    Edmonton, Alberta Canada

    • Marked as answer by xyz_999 Wednesday, January 25, 2012 12:04 AM
    Sunday, January 22, 2012 10:35 PM