locked
Replacing two quad core PCs with a dual six-core PC under Windows embedded RRS feed

  • Question


  • I wanted to post this to get some feedback on the best way to proceed.

    Here's where we are now:
    We have been designing equipment based on using two PC's, each with a single Intel quad-core processor(Q9400), connected by a GigE link. The processing is divided between the two PCs in a signal flow arrangment. The application programs are multithreaded C/C++ console applications running under 32-bit XP embedded. We need to be able to do more processing per unit time to meet future requirements.

    Here are our self-imposed constraints:
    (1) We need to run a Windows embedded OS with EWF.
    (2) We need to use commonly available Intel processors as opposed to fpga's or gpus( since We use 32-bit integer math).
    (3) We need to use C/C++ and explicit multithreading coordinated by event objects.

    What we are thinking about trying:
    In order to get more cores and also to do away with the GigE link between the PCs, we are looking at a PC using a dual six-core motherboard (2 x E5645). We want to be sure that we are not making some wrong assumptions about how the 12-core PC would work based on our experience with the 4-core PCs. From the primary thread we would launch perhaps 10 additional priority 31 threads to live until the application exits. The threads would implement a state-machine controlled by event objects thereby continuously moving data through the various processing steps in a continuous flow.

    Some questions that come to mind:
    1. Will a Windows embedded OS allow us to use & control all 12 cores?
    2. Should we be moving from VS2005 & VS2008 to VS2010?
    3. Should we move from XP embedded SP3 to Windows Embedded Standard (or server to better use E5645)?
    4. Should we consider using Intel Integrate Perfromance Primitives in Visual Studio to access E5645 enhancements?
    5. What have we overlooked?

    I would appreciate your advice.

    Wednesday, June 29, 2011 9:07 PM

Answers

  •  

    1. I believe 32 cores is the maximum XP can support, but the old chart from Microsoft is not available. You might want to think about WES7 and using 64 bit.

    2. I would go with the latest Visual Studio 2010.

    4. Yes Intel IPP would help optimize the code as much as possible.

    -Sean

     

     


    www.sjjmicro.com / www.seanliming.com / www.annabooks.com, Book Author - ProGuide to WES 7, XP Embedded Advanced, WEPOS / POS for .NET Step-by-Step
    • Marked as answer by ai4vpapa Thursday, June 30, 2011 5:26 PM
    Wednesday, June 29, 2011 10:40 PM

All replies

  •  

    1. I believe 32 cores is the maximum XP can support, but the old chart from Microsoft is not available. You might want to think about WES7 and using 64 bit.

    2. I would go with the latest Visual Studio 2010.

    4. Yes Intel IPP would help optimize the code as much as possible.

    -Sean

     

     


    www.sjjmicro.com / www.seanliming.com / www.annabooks.com, Book Author - ProGuide to WES 7, XP Embedded Advanced, WEPOS / POS for .NET Step-by-Step
    • Marked as answer by ai4vpapa Thursday, June 30, 2011 5:26 PM
    Wednesday, June 29, 2011 10:40 PM
  • Thank you Sean. Your advice carries lots of weight with me. I have your book Windows XP Embedded Advanced  & plan to buy your new one soon.

    Steve Welch

    Thursday, June 30, 2011 5:24 PM
  • You might want to instal Windows XP Pri and Windows 7 on the platform first. This will give you a chance to try the OS on the new hardware and see if the cores are supported. Also, it is a good idea to run the desktop version as you develop yout applications since theading is going to be an issue.

    Make sure to get the book Windows Internals 5th Edition, which will help with OS related topics.

    -Sean


    www.sjjmicro.com / www.seanliming.com / www.annabooks.com, Book Author - ProGuide to WES 7, XP Embedded Advanced, WEPOS / POS for .NET Step-by-Step
    Thursday, June 30, 2011 11:00 PM
  • Sean,


    I'll do as suggested. BTW I ordered your latest book on Windows embedded 7 yesterday, and also your other book on realtime programming. I don't have a license for the INtime development software yet since so far I have managed without it. I also will get the Windows Internals 5th Edition. I have certainly gotten my moneys worth from the Windows Internals 4th Edition.

    Steve Welch

    Friday, July 1, 2011 6:06 PM