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Visual Studio 2013, SQL Server 2012 and backward comptibility RRS feed

  • Question

  • User-108355162 posted

    Hello,

    I am a bit confused ...

    At the moment I devlop webistes using VS2012 and SQL Server 2008 R2.

    I now want to reinstall my PC with Windows 8.1, Vs2013 and SQL Server 2012 (or 2014).

    Can I still use my old projects that used SQL Server 2008 R2 and make changes to the (2008 R2) database without problems?
    Will I still be able to upload that changed database to my hosting provider that uses SQL Server 2008 R2 for the production site?

    Sorry if that is a silly question, as I said I am a bit confused at the moment.

    Thanks in advance for your help

    Best regards

    Thomas


     

    Tuesday, December 3, 2013 6:06 PM

Answers

  • User-1853252149 posted

    VS2013 will do this fine.  Windows 8.1 doesn't affect this at all.

    Jeff

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Wednesday, December 4, 2013 9:51 AM
  • User-1853252149 posted

    So does that mean it will not work?

    This is a SQL limitation on backwards compatibility.  So if you are trying to copy a 2012 database and attach it to an earlier version, you will have problems.  The earlier version won't understand the later format.

    The easy way around this for web developers is to develop to a version of SQL that exists in the deployment environment.  Use SQL 2008 if your server has SQL 2008.  But there are obviosuly ways to deploy database changes that don't rely on versions.  You can find more info on this in SQL forums.

    Personally, I use multiple virtual machines for development, configured to match the deployment environment exactly.  It just simplifies my life.

    Oh, keep in mind that version changes also break SSIS packages for SQL deployment, which makes it harder to deploy an app to many systems.

    Also keep in mind that I am in no way a SQL expert.  I program to SQL and I manage SQL servers, but even my boss semms to know that I'm never sure what I'm doing.  :)

    Jeff

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Thursday, December 5, 2013 9:05 AM

All replies

  • User-1853252149 posted

    VS2013 will do this fine.  Windows 8.1 doesn't affect this at all.

    Jeff

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Wednesday, December 4, 2013 9:51 AM
  • User-2067659088 posted

    Microsoft Visual Studio 2013 Compatibility document provides detialed explanation .

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh266747.aspx

    Thursday, December 5, 2013 12:41 AM
  • User-108355162 posted

    VS2013 will do this fine.  Windows 8.1 doesn't affect this at all.

    Jeff

     

    Hi Jeff, on http://dba.stackexchange.com/questions/15682/sql-server-2012-backward-compatibility-for-backups-with-2008

    a guy says;

    "...  When you attach a database to a newer major version (like from 2008 to 2008R2, or 2008R2 to 2012) the database version is changed permanently, and you can't attach that database to an older version again."

    So does that mean it will not work?

    Best regards

    Thomas

     

    Thursday, December 5, 2013 4:15 AM
  • User-1853252149 posted

    So does that mean it will not work?

    This is a SQL limitation on backwards compatibility.  So if you are trying to copy a 2012 database and attach it to an earlier version, you will have problems.  The earlier version won't understand the later format.

    The easy way around this for web developers is to develop to a version of SQL that exists in the deployment environment.  Use SQL 2008 if your server has SQL 2008.  But there are obviosuly ways to deploy database changes that don't rely on versions.  You can find more info on this in SQL forums.

    Personally, I use multiple virtual machines for development, configured to match the deployment environment exactly.  It just simplifies my life.

    Oh, keep in mind that version changes also break SSIS packages for SQL deployment, which makes it harder to deploy an app to many systems.

    Also keep in mind that I am in no way a SQL expert.  I program to SQL and I manage SQL servers, but even my boss semms to know that I'm never sure what I'm doing.  :)

    Jeff

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Thursday, December 5, 2013 9:05 AM