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  • Question

  • Will/Does Standard 7 Embedded support TRIM command for SSD?
    Wednesday, May 12, 2010 2:07 AM

Answers

  • That's an interesting scenario. Yes, you coud format the drive in step 5 (on Win7) instead of step 4 (on XP) to trigger TRIM.
    Srikanth Kamath [MSFT] - This posting is provided "As Is" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
    • Marked as answer by u_p Thursday, May 13, 2010 4:27 PM
    Thursday, May 13, 2010 4:04 PM

All replies

  • Yes. Both Win7 and WES 7 support TRIM with SSDs. Please refer this article for details - http://blogs.msdn.com/e7/archive/2009/05/05/support-and-q-a-for-solid-state-drives-and.aspx
    Srikanth Kamath [MSFT] - This posting is provided "As Is" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
    Wednesday, May 12, 2010 3:23 AM
  • Srikanth ,

    Thanks for the quick response...here is some more info on my application. Maybe you have some suggestions.

    I am using WinXPe in an embedded, headless data logger application.  Due to vibration environment, we must use SSD.  We currently only use Intel SSD because they have a utility that can manually send the trim command (or equivalent) and keep the write speed performance at "like new" levels.

    Drives from other manufacturers are not possible unless they offer a similar utility.

    My thought is that with Win 7 Embedded, we can manually TRIM the drive by creating a file at system startup that uses all available disk space, and then deleting the file.  If the OS, driver and drive support TRIM then this should keep the performance high.  

    Do you have any experience with SSD's.  Any thoughts on this approach?

     

    Thanks!

    u_p


    Wednesday, May 12, 2010 5:34 PM
  • I don't think sending manual TRIM commands is necessary. Here's why -

    TRIM involves pre-erasing a set of blocks that are currently not in use by the file system. You cannot TRIM blocks in use by the file system. So the earliest opportunity to TRIM it again is when these blocks are relinquished by the file system (due to a delete , format etc). NTFS automatically issues TRIM in response to ALL these opportunities so that the SSD can pre-erase the freed up blocks.

     

     


    Srikanth Kamath [MSFT] - This posting is provided "As Is" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
    Thursday, May 13, 2010 3:49 AM
  • What if we have the following use case...

     

    1) install new drive in Win7 logging computer.

    2) fill drive to 100% capacity

    3) remove drive and install in WinXP processing computer

    4) copy data to server, format drive

    5) reinstall in the Win7 logging machine

     

    This is the scenario where i wonder if re-formatting the drive on the Win7 machine, or creating a large file and then deleteing it would help to keep performance at like new performance.

     

    u_p

     

    Thursday, May 13, 2010 3:22 PM
  • That's an interesting scenario. Yes, you coud format the drive in step 5 (on Win7) instead of step 4 (on XP) to trigger TRIM.
    Srikanth Kamath [MSFT] - This posting is provided "As Is" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
    • Marked as answer by u_p Thursday, May 13, 2010 4:27 PM
    Thursday, May 13, 2010 4:04 PM
  • we have our drives installed in a removable carrier.  the bay that is installed in the logging computer has a direct SATA connection to the motherboard.  For data download it is common to put the removable carrier into a box that has a SATA-> USB converter and then connect to a laptop.  I assume the TRIM command will not get thru an adapter like this and then again you can delete  file or format the drive without the TRIM getting to the drive.  Here again, forcing a TRIM on the logging computer would guarantee "like new" performance.  this is the theory anyway.  thanks for your feedback.

     

    u_p

    Thursday, May 13, 2010 4:46 PM