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Can't compact Access 2010 database in a shared folder after the migration process RRS feed

  • Question

  • The problem emerged after moving the file server from WS2012R2 to WS2016

    Firstly, in Access 2010 the base is opened from a mapped disk. Then I click compact and restore, the process of compaction begins, I see the temp file in the same folder. Process takes several minutes, but in the end I've got this error

     The compact and repair operation has been cancelled. You might not have adequate permissions to the folder that the database is located in. You need full permissions to the directory the database is located to compact and repair. Contact your system administrator for more information.

    If I make a copy of the database in the safe folder or locally, I've got no error.

    It makes no difference if I assign Full rights to the user explicitly for this folder.

    I can successfully compact a database w/o making a copy using Access 2016 (but with a different account).

    What can be done to allow users compact Access databases in shared folders?

    Thursday, May 24, 2018 9:04 AM

Answers

All replies

  • Hi,

    It seems that the issue is related to Access database. To better fixed the issue, I move the thread to Access forum for more suggestion.

    Thanks for your understanding.


    Best Regards,
    Winnie Liang


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they helped. If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnsf@microsoft.com.


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    Friday, May 25, 2018 5:23 AM
  • Hello Kupriyanov,

    Just like the error message said, I'm wondering if you have full permission to the directory where the database is located. Could you add a text file in the directory? If you can, what about updating and deleting operation?

    You said that you could compact a database use a different account using Access. If you try to use the account to compact the database using Access 2010, could you compact it?

    Best Regards,

    Terry


    MSDN Community Support
    Please remember to click "Mark as Answer" the responses that resolved your issue, and to click "Unmark as Answer" if not. This can be beneficial to other community members reading this thread. If you have any compliments or complaints to MSDN Support, feel free to contact MSDNFSF@microsoft.com.

    Friday, May 25, 2018 7:39 AM
  • It's never a good idea to perform a compact over a network.  You should always copythefilelocallyy, performm the compact and then copy the file back onto the network drive.

    Daniel Pineault, 2010-2017 Microsoft MVP
    Professional Support: http://www.cardaconsultants.com
    MS Access Tips and Code Samples: http://www.devhut.net


    • Edited by Daniel Pineault (MVP)MVP Friday, May 25, 2018 10:08 AM Trying to fix the Editors mes, but can't. Delete a letter and it deletes other thing,. What a mess with the wysiwyg!
    Friday, May 25, 2018 10:07 AM
  • I grant Full access to this user explicitly & it makes no difference.

    This user have all rights. It is proven by the ability of compacting any copy of this base in the same folder.

    The user only can't compact the original file. 

    Friday, May 25, 2018 1:42 PM
  • I haven't found any proof of this statement (It's never a good idea to perform a compact over a network), it could make a sense for multiple user access. But as I know, this is not our case.


    • Edited by Kupriyanov Friday, May 25, 2018 2:06 PM add
    Friday, May 25, 2018 1:47 PM
  • I haven't found any proof of this statement (It's never a good idea to perform a compact over a network), it could make a sense for multiple user access. But as I know, this is not our case.


    I don't know how much proof you need, but as an Access developer for more than 20 years, I can vouch for Daniel's statement even though it should not be necessary. He is a highly skilled and knowledgeable developer.

    I've seen many things go wrong when compacting medium to large databases over a network . Play it safe and compact locally.


    Bill Mosca
    www.thatlldoit.com
    http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/MS_Access_Professionals

    Friday, May 25, 2018 2:24 PM
  • I didn't want to show disrespect. I have warned my user about this (I'm absolutely not an Access developer or even user).

    But I've got users and they say that whole their live they make this operation on that share and now they wonder what has changed and why they have to copy these bases and so on.

    For myself... I need some understanding of the situation. Is it new WS2016 behavior or something else happened during migration?



    • Edited by Kupriyanov Friday, May 25, 2018 3:06 PM
    Friday, May 25, 2018 2:58 PM
  • There isn't much you can do to troubleshoot this. I've taken on existing databases that have been in use for years and suddenly something goes wrong. Some of the possible underlying causes are:

    1. the database has some minor corruption that isn't being fixed with compacting. A one-time decompiling/recompiling might fix it. Instructions here. But I still would not rely on an over-network compacting in the future.

    2. the network isn't as stable as it used to be.

    3. The database has finally grown to the danger-point size where over-network compacting is unreliable. There is no exact point at which this happens so I can't give you a magic number where it is still safe.


    Bill Mosca
    www.thatlldoit.com
    http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/MS_Access_Professionals

    Friday, May 25, 2018 3:15 PM
  • I can't help tell you exactly what's changed, but I can confirm that over the years I've seen numerous 'non recommended' installation work fine and then sudden stop.  In every instance, implementing 'recommended' setup has always remedied whatever the issue was.  So yes, I suspect Microsoft flipped some switch, change some seeings... , but which one, what exactly is the issue...

    Just follow best practices and everything should behave, until ...

    http://www.devhut.net/2017/04/20/access-best-practices-and-troubleshooting-steps/

    http://www.devhut.net/2017/04/09/setting-up-an-ms-access-database/

    Following the basic guidelines normally keep people put of trouble (ignoring software bugs of which there have been plenty with Office 365).


    Daniel Pineault, 2010-2017 Microsoft MVP
    Professional Support: http://www.cardaconsultants.com
    MS Access Tips and Code Samples: http://www.devhut.net

    • Proposed as answer by Terry Xu - MSFT Tuesday, May 29, 2018 8:10 AM
    • Marked as answer by Kupriyanov Wednesday, May 30, 2018 9:34 AM
    Friday, May 25, 2018 8:33 PM
  • Daniel,

    these are great articles. I couldn't imagine there are so many issues in Access.

    I consider this question to be closed. 

    Monday, May 28, 2018 8:24 AM
  • Hello,

    I would suggest you mark the helpful reply to close the thread. It will also be  helpful for other developers who run into the same issue find this solution.

    Best Regards,

    Terry


    MSDN Community Support
    Please remember to click "Mark as Answer" the responses that resolved your issue, and to click "Unmark as Answer" if not. This can be beneficial to other community members reading this thread. If you have any compliments or complaints to MSDN Support, feel free to contact MSDNFSF@microsoft.com.

    Tuesday, May 29, 2018 8:12 AM
  • The problem is solved by granting Full Access rights for everyone to the share.

    It could possibly be helpful to reassign current NTFS rights to the folder, but I haven't tried it. 

    Wednesday, August 29, 2018 7:16 AM