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DotNetOpenAuth RRS feed

  • Question

  • Greetings,

    Has anyone succeded in using DotNetOpenAuth to authenticate with Windows Live? Any sample that I can look into?

    Thanks!

    RP

    Monday, March 5, 2012 9:13 AM

Answers

  • Yes, DNOA 4.0 has a few breaking changes from the 3.x release.  As for its target framework, it targets both 3.5 and 4.0 now (NuGet will automatically pick the right binaries for your target framework).
    Thursday, March 8, 2012 6:30 AM

All replies

  • Unfortuantely, I have not tried using that library to conntect to Windows Live. It seems like it should work though, since it supports OAuth2.0. Have you looked at their samples? Are you expierencing any issues using this library against our service?

    If you don't already know, you can find our documentation on oauth at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh243647.aspx

    I will also try asking around to see if anyone on the team has used that library before.

    Simon

    Tuesday, March 6, 2012 7:12 PM
  • DotNetOpenAuth 4.0 is about to ship, and it will include a sample Windows Live ID client login.
    Thursday, March 8, 2012 2:07 AM
  • And also,

    OAuth 2 supporting DotNetOpenAuth will be versioned as
    v4.0, and as such has accepted certain breaking changes from previous
    versions.  Specifically around the persistence stores (if you're on a web
    farm or otherwise using a database to store data for DotNetOpenAuth) there
    will be breaking changes.  DNOA still targets .NET 3.5.

    Thursday, March 8, 2012 6:25 AM
  • Yes, DNOA 4.0 has a few breaking changes from the 3.x release.  As for its target framework, it targets both 3.5 and 4.0 now (NuGet will automatically pick the right binaries for your target framework).
    Thursday, March 8, 2012 6:30 AM
  • Andrew,

    Is there release notes available listing the breaking changes with 4.X? We are planning to upgrade from 3.4 to 4.1. 

    Monday, July 16, 2012 2:03 AM
  • Karthik,

    If you stick with getting DotNetOpenAuth v4.1 from Sourceforge (the .zip download) then it will be almost identical.  If you switch to getting it via NuGet (recommended) then you can choose the DotNetOpenAuth.Ultimate, which again is almost identical, or you can choose a specific DotNetOpenAuth package for your usage requirements (e.g. only as an OpenID Relying Party, etc.) to get several smaller packages that have just what you require.

    Either way, the only breaking changes IIRC are how you define your <configSections> in your web.config for the <dotNetOpenAuth> sections, and a few compilation breaks that you might see, depending on which parts of the library you are using.

    Monday, July 16, 2012 2:09 AM