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.framework roadmap RRS feed

  • Question

  • hi,

    didn't find better place where to put this question so hopefully this is good one...

    I'd like to know if anybody knows of any roadmap for future versions of .NET framework possibly going beyond 2013. I know there's currently 4.5 which is based on 4.0 bcl (correct ?) - but is there anything after that? would that be another 4.0 "update" or new framework running side-by-side with 4.0 ?

    thanks for any link or comment!

    Lubos

    Wednesday, October 26, 2011 8:28 AM

Answers

  • I don't think their are going to be big changes.

    The invension of the CLR, CIL, BLC in their first verions (1.0, 1.1) were Microsoft's biggest movements forward. .net 2.0 included generics and some other cool features that really helped in building apps. .net 3.0 added nothing practical in programming, only WPF which helped in animations and window layout designing (controls stopped being rectangles with poor drawing).

    .net 4.0 includes nothing that I have used or plan to use. Version 4.5 it's just ".net framework for Windows 8" as someone said.

     

    I will give You an example to understand (it's an EXAMPLE, not true):

    • .net 1 invented the point class - wow
    • .net 2 added point3d, point with generic dimensions
    • .net 3 added ipoint interface, point3d translation options, advanced 3d mathematical operations, point3d with custom axes....
    • net 4 - their is no sense of adding thirty more APIs for the point class, let's invent something else (the line class :-) )

     

    • Proposed as answer by Jacob Brown Saturday, October 29, 2011 5:06 PM
    • Marked as answer by LubosSykora Sunday, October 30, 2011 10:16 AM
    Wednesday, October 26, 2011 2:31 PM
  • Well... Did You know that Windows can run 3.11 programs or DOS programs?

    The big problem about Microsoft is that it makes a system for EVERYBODY: computer programmers, software designers, web designers, kids playing games, teens using the web, pros using advanced services like databases, parallel computing, clouds and so on... Window is a system for everyone, so really it has to meet everyones expectations.

    Expectations that in the PC business mean also compatibility backward. You can't say: OK, now everyone is using Windows 7, Office 2010, VS 2010... You can't build a system with support for 2-3 year components and remove everything else (drivers, APIs, frameworks). If Windows 95 included support for GDI, newer versions (I don't remember which) for GDI+ and Windows 7 for DirectDraw, DirectWrite etc... you can't remove GDI and GDI+ and say: use today's technologies, because they are better, more stable, faster, secure and give user's better quality.

    Microsoft should make a new version of Windows, a brand new version giving compatibility for todays hardware only. I counted few years ago it would remove 2/3 of the components, libraries, resources and so on... Then in few years it would have backward compatibility for few years, but all legacy hardware (SATA I drives, SDRAM memory, one core processors) would be passed in tests, and the new features could be added without any harm.

    .net Framework follows Windows. If Windows includes everything, .net will include everything also.

    My kids (as all kids in they age) use a computer to browse the web, and play games. In theory Windows 95 also could do that, it just required (officially) 4 MB of RAM, not 4 GB.

     

    • Proposed as answer by Jacob Brown Saturday, October 29, 2011 5:06 PM
    • Marked as answer by LubosSykora Sunday, October 30, 2011 10:17 AM
    Thursday, October 27, 2011 12:27 PM
  • hi,

    thanks for answer. however i don't think you can judge it so simply. there're many things which are interesting for us, like mvc3, parallel library stuff, memory-mapped files support,...

    from our experience when we migrated from 2.0 -> 3.5 - it was easy. I'm just not sure, how difficult is to migrate between stand-alone frameworks - i mean if we need to recompile anything or if 4.0 can run assemblies compiled against 2.0... i found article stating that it's not a problem, but also some saying opposite... any experience?

    Lubos

     

    • Proposed as answer by Jacob Brown Saturday, October 29, 2011 5:06 PM
    • Marked as answer by LubosSykora Sunday, October 30, 2011 10:17 AM
    Thursday, October 27, 2011 5:42 AM

All replies

  • I don't think their are going to be big changes.

    The invension of the CLR, CIL, BLC in their first verions (1.0, 1.1) were Microsoft's biggest movements forward. .net 2.0 included generics and some other cool features that really helped in building apps. .net 3.0 added nothing practical in programming, only WPF which helped in animations and window layout designing (controls stopped being rectangles with poor drawing).

    .net 4.0 includes nothing that I have used or plan to use. Version 4.5 it's just ".net framework for Windows 8" as someone said.

     

    I will give You an example to understand (it's an EXAMPLE, not true):

    • .net 1 invented the point class - wow
    • .net 2 added point3d, point with generic dimensions
    • .net 3 added ipoint interface, point3d translation options, advanced 3d mathematical operations, point3d with custom axes....
    • net 4 - their is no sense of adding thirty more APIs for the point class, let's invent something else (the line class :-) )

     

    • Proposed as answer by Jacob Brown Saturday, October 29, 2011 5:06 PM
    • Marked as answer by LubosSykora Sunday, October 30, 2011 10:16 AM
    Wednesday, October 26, 2011 2:31 PM
  • hi,

    thanks for answer. however i don't think you can judge it so simply. there're many things which are interesting for us, like mvc3, parallel library stuff, memory-mapped files support,...

    from our experience when we migrated from 2.0 -> 3.5 - it was easy. I'm just not sure, how difficult is to migrate between stand-alone frameworks - i mean if we need to recompile anything or if 4.0 can run assemblies compiled against 2.0... i found article stating that it's not a problem, but also some saying opposite... any experience?

    Lubos

     

    • Proposed as answer by Jacob Brown Saturday, October 29, 2011 5:06 PM
    • Marked as answer by LubosSykora Sunday, October 30, 2011 10:17 AM
    Thursday, October 27, 2011 5:42 AM
  • Well... Did You know that Windows can run 3.11 programs or DOS programs?

    The big problem about Microsoft is that it makes a system for EVERYBODY: computer programmers, software designers, web designers, kids playing games, teens using the web, pros using advanced services like databases, parallel computing, clouds and so on... Window is a system for everyone, so really it has to meet everyones expectations.

    Expectations that in the PC business mean also compatibility backward. You can't say: OK, now everyone is using Windows 7, Office 2010, VS 2010... You can't build a system with support for 2-3 year components and remove everything else (drivers, APIs, frameworks). If Windows 95 included support for GDI, newer versions (I don't remember which) for GDI+ and Windows 7 for DirectDraw, DirectWrite etc... you can't remove GDI and GDI+ and say: use today's technologies, because they are better, more stable, faster, secure and give user's better quality.

    Microsoft should make a new version of Windows, a brand new version giving compatibility for todays hardware only. I counted few years ago it would remove 2/3 of the components, libraries, resources and so on... Then in few years it would have backward compatibility for few years, but all legacy hardware (SATA I drives, SDRAM memory, one core processors) would be passed in tests, and the new features could be added without any harm.

    .net Framework follows Windows. If Windows includes everything, .net will include everything also.

    My kids (as all kids in they age) use a computer to browse the web, and play games. In theory Windows 95 also could do that, it just required (officially) 4 MB of RAM, not 4 GB.

     

    • Proposed as answer by Jacob Brown Saturday, October 29, 2011 5:06 PM
    • Marked as answer by LubosSykora Sunday, October 30, 2011 10:17 AM
    Thursday, October 27, 2011 12:27 PM