locked
SSDT feature request RRS feed

  • Question

  • I would like to request a Query tool like the one we have in the old Server Explorer 'New Query' option.  I cannot begin to tell you the time savings this tool provide for me where I can very fast create a complex SQL with all the joins and fields I need.  I can always go back and then manually tweak whatever I do not like and so forth but it is a wonderful time savng feature that I would like to strongly suggest for a near future release.  Thanks...
    Friday, April 13, 2012 1:12 PM

Answers

  • Hi David,

    Thanks for passing on your feedback.  A query designer or robust query editor is not in our future plans for SSDT, but I'll make sure to log your request.  As a workaround, I'd recommend using SSMS for your query authoring.

    Thanks,

    Janet Yeilding 

    • Proposed as answer by Janet Yeilding Thursday, April 19, 2012 8:48 PM
    • Marked as answer by dsuarez001 Thursday, April 19, 2012 8:51 PM
    Thursday, April 19, 2012 8:47 PM

All replies

  • Hi David,

    Thanks for passing on your feedback.  A query designer or robust query editor is not in our future plans for SSDT, but I'll make sure to log your request.  As a workaround, I'd recommend using SSMS for your query authoring.

    Thanks,

    Janet Yeilding 

    • Proposed as answer by Janet Yeilding Thursday, April 19, 2012 8:48 PM
    • Marked as answer by dsuarez001 Thursday, April 19, 2012 8:51 PM
    Thursday, April 19, 2012 8:47 PM
  • Hi Janet,

    in my opinion the request of David is essential. The work with databases not just for developing but for adhoc queries often needed during the development process was fast und fluent with Visual Studio 2010 (or is still with 2012 when using a 2008 SQL Server). You design a little query, execute and change it when a field is missing and edit some data directly in the results. This is what I need daily as a database developer. Nothing of that is possible with the new SSDT.

    - no query designer in Visual Studio

    - the query designer in SSMS only designs a query once, changes are impossible

    - if I wrote a select-query myself, I can't edit directly the results (essential for quick debugging purposes)

    - if I view/edit all records, I can't just switch it into a query (finding the right record is a huge effort)

    - no data compare

    - schema compare doesn't list connections from Server Explorer, but you have to define them a second time

    - no script generation ("publish to provider" is missing)

    Sorry, but from my view, SSDT is a really big disadvantage.

    Thanks,

    Timo Dettmar (a professional developer)


    • Edited by T. Dettmar Monday, September 10, 2012 3:59 PM
    Monday, September 10, 2012 3:33 PM
  • I go along with T. Dettmar for basically the same reasons.

    I use Query Designer primary for adhoc queries. It is huge advantage to be able to view the data and the code at the same time, in the same tool. When debugging quite often you need different views of the data that will never be used directly in the application.

    So now rather than using one tool for my day to day work I will now need at least 2, VS2010 for the Query Designer and VS2012 for coding. Or now possibly even SSMS in addition. Or maybe we just stay on VS2010.


    Scott

    Friday, October 19, 2012 12:14 PM
  • Can I offer a different perspective? I've been using SSDT for about 18 months now and not once have I thought "Oh a query designer would be so useful here". I prefer to write my queries my hand, leveraging intellisense (when it works). Different strokes for different folks I guess.

    I agree with Timo that there is a severe lack of script generation features (e.g. Script->SELECT To/INSERT To/UPDATE To).


    ObjectStorageHelper<T> – A WinRT utility for Windows 8 | http://sqlblog.com/blogs/jamie_thomson/ | @jamiet | About me
    Jamie Thomson

    Friday, November 22, 2013 8:41 AM
  • I've had the same problem (discussed on another recent thread).

    Best solution I can find is to set up another connection in Server Explorer in VS. Select the Microsoft SQL Server (SqlClient) source and click Change, then switch the provider to .NET Framework Data Provider for OLE DB, then select the same database.

    Now you can do visual queries and quick data updates etc. without leaving Visual Studio.

    Works on VS2013 to SQL2008 or SQL2012, and I'm pretty sure (have done far to many combination tests in the last week!) the same from VS2012.

    Monday, November 25, 2013 1:42 PM