locked
Silverlight in WP7 browser RRS feed

  • Question

  • I love the huge value provided by Silverlight.  But I am so incredibly disappointed in Microsoft BLOCKING silverlight.  There is no excuse for WP7 not being able to show pages with silverlight on them.  Microsoft's desire to control the apps, which is fine, has blinded them to the fact that the people who make silverlight apps for WP7 are the same people that WOULD use silverlight in their website.

    Dear Microsoft, people spend a huge amount of their web-surfing time on their phones (and tablets).  NOBODY IS GOING TO BUILD A WEBSITE THAT CAN'T BE VIEWED ON PHONES AND TABLETS.   Therefore, MS is wasting all the opportunity to have people build rich websites with silverlight.   For example, a somebody wants to build an awsome website with beautiful interactive UI and fading and animations and everything. An awsome web experience for the site visitors.

    HERE'S WHAT THEY ARE NOT GOING TO BUILD: An awesome interactive site that cannot be viewed on tablets, let alone WINDOWS phones that are based on silverlight.

    Microsoft, STOP KILLING SILVERLIGHT.  People would actually love to use it in their websites, but nobody will if it can't be seen on phones and tablets.  Of course, it's not thier fault with iOS or 'droid, but with WP7 it's pure stupidity to think that "well you could just make an app" is some kind of acceptable answer.  It does not address the main issue, that people want a website to be able to be viewed on a phone and in a tablet.  We can wait one more year. NO LONGER.

    Monday, August 29, 2011 2:06 PM

All replies

  • I'm not sure I agree at all. Are you telling me a nice, big, beautiful, interactive Silverlight website would look fine on the smaller viewing area of a phone? I highly doubt it.

    It's also about more than controlling the apps. There are some implications for security and otherwise. For example, in Silverlight in the browser you have a load file and save file dialog. How does that make sense/transalte on the phone, which doesn't have an explorer-type file system? What about a Silverlight application that does a boatload of heavy computing that would drain the resources of the phone - should that just be allowed to run rampant and impede the user experience?  

    The typical argument is that because it won't run Silverlight that will kill it, but the reality out there just doesn't support that argument. Even companies like Facebook and Google who are embracing HTML5 are writing multiple versions of their applications - Google just created a Silverlight uploader for YouTube, for example, and Facebook has native apps for the various phones and does not try to force a single "one-size-fits-all" website.

    I think you are also confusing websites with applications. I write applications for tablets, phones, etc. all of the team and people are absolutely happy and willing to target the devices they will run on. Silverlight doesn't make sense for just a website - it's overkill for something that needs search engine optimization and that is where HTML5 will provide at least a consistent experience across browsers. You will still have to design different views for different form factors (phone vs. desktop) so it doesn't buy you the dream of "write once run everywhere" but it certainly gets you closer. Why would you want to write a website in Silverlight? I can understand applications as that I what I do, day in and out, and I have yet to find a company with a serious application that would settle for a one-size-fits all.

    Finally, you CAN view Silverlight on tablets. We write Silverlight applications all of the time and they run on all of the Windows-7 based tablets and I presume after two weeks we'll learn they run fine on Windows 8 as well. As for the iPad, that has nothing to do with Silverlight - people aren't writing Flash apps for that and even those writing HTML5 have to write targetted apps to get a good experience, so you're still back to writing a specific application based on the target device.

     

    Monday, August 29, 2011 2:57 PM
  • Why do you think that Silverlight won't work on the tablet?  Silverlight works fine on current tablets.  As for Windows 8, there is no confirmation but I don't see any reason why Silverlight wouldn't render on the tablet.  The OS will have a browser (IE9 or IE10), which should be capable of rendering Silverlight applications. 

    WP7 is a different beast where the Silverlight is used for applications.  I agree that WP7 should support Silverlight in-browser.

    Monday, August 29, 2011 3:22 PM
  • I write applications for tablets, phones, etc. all of the team and people are absolutely happy and willing to target the devices they will run on. Silverlight doesn't make sense for just a website - it's overkill for something that needs search engine optimization and that is where HTML5 will provide at least a consistent experience across browsers.

    There are thousands of flash sites around.  People were making them right and left before the rise of modern smartphones that don't render flash started making them undesireable.  This was Microsoft's chance to make silverlight a valid web technology to replace much of what flash does on websites.  The fact that they are not doing it is a major loss.

    As you primarily write apps, I think you may have lost touch with why it is that HTML is so frustrating to website devlopers.  EVERY BROWSER RENDERS HTML DIFFERENTLY.  Now this is not really HTML's fault entirely, but it is the case.   Write a site in HTML/CSS open in 5 different browsers and you get 5 different renderings of spaces, margins, colors, layers, etc.  If you look at most well-known sites today, they have little snippets of code all over the place to display differently according to what browser they are in.  That is a huge maintenance nightmare.  Enter Flash.  developers liked it because a pixel is a pixel is a pixel.  All the effects, colors, lines, spacing was the same, because the same engine was rendering it.

    It's not future-thinking to have sites where graphics are rendered, cut into slices, and code snippets per browser placed to space them.  Sure, some sites don't need to be any more than text.   In fact it used to be frowned upon that images were used for buttons, because "what if you're on a mobil device or a browser that doesn't have javascript enabled'.  But in the end, designers created nice websites with images for buttons and tabs, and javascript, and businesses and consumers chose those sites.

    If I want a nice little interactive chart on my website, and phones with silverlight would be able to see it, I would use silverlight instead of flash.  If I want a little 3d text flipping effect on my website, I should be able to see it on my phone.   If I want images to flutter into the screen and arrange themselves in a stack, I should be able to see that on my phone.   And silverlight is much better suited to these effects than HTML or even flash.

    I'm sick and tired of the lack of vision that stifles rich media websites because of the out-moded, obsessive-compulsive idea that a website is just text with formatting and static images.  Sure there is room for HTML pages on "websites", but a website is a user experience, a way that a user learns, interacts, get's things done.   HTML doesn't cut it.  a PC doesn't cut it. I want to do it on my phone, because that's with me always, and is fast becoming a primary way people view the web.

     

    Tuesday, August 30, 2011 5:21 PM
  • Are you telling me a nice, big, beautiful, interactive Silverlight website would look fine on the smaller viewing area of a phone? I highly doubt it.

    Are you serious?  You could say that about ANY website.  [Are you sure a nice big beautiful HTML CSS website would look fine on the smaller viewing area of a phone?]  In Bill Gates speak "That's the dummest thing I've ever heard".   Seriously Jeremy, do you think no one uses their web browser to view normal websites in normal (not mobile) view.  You are terribly wrong on that point.   It is extremely commonplace for someone to be viewing websites in normal mode on their phones, though granted there's always a bit a zooming in and out.

    What I'm advocating here is that silverlight is a great technology to complement a modern website, and Microsoft is stifling its common use on the web by purposefully BLOCKING it's use on phone browsers.  Again, millions of people everyday are surfing the web on their phones (very often, in "normal browser" mode), and when they go to a Microsoft site, with their Microsoft phone, and see a box at the top of the website that says "download silverlight", and then they can't, that's horrible.   People wan't to see pictures in their phone browsers, so why wouldn't they want to see animations and effects? 

    I'm a lifetime Microsoft supporter and programmer, and that's why it's so extremely apalling to me that microsoft people keep pushing this nonsense idea that the web should not have anything but text and static images, and that people should get an app for each and every website that wants to do anything but text and static images.

    WHAT????

    Tuesday, September 6, 2011 6:25 PM