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three tier architecture RRS feed

  • Question

  • User1871608734 posted

    Hi friends,

           I am totally confused about the three tier architecture. Please guide me how to handle this.

    As I know tiers refers the server in the sense the below each in separate system

     

    1.RDBMS

    2.Application (Which contains all 3 layers)

    3.Browser

     

    Whether this is three tier architecture mean whats the purpose of layers?

     

    In case , if it is as

     

    1.Presentation Layer

    2.Bussiness logic layer

    3.DataAccessLayer

     

    How can I move each layer in different machine or server?

     

    Which one is three tier architecture?

     

    Please help me!

     

    Thanks in advance.

     

     

    Tuesday, March 9, 2010 3:22 PM

Answers

  • User-1088661752 posted

    Hi,

      The traditional three tiered architecture is as you described in the latter. I've seen this called both n-Tier and Layered architecture.

      Your Presentation Layer is responsible for calling the Business Logic Layer. Your Business Logic Layer calls your Data Access Layer. Your Data Access Layer returns information back to your Business Logic Layer, which implements business rules (logic). Once your Business Logic layer has finished processing the data, it returns it to the Presentation Layer. So you can see it goes in a big circle.

      The layers are important, because they seperate concerns of the application. The Presentation layer does not care what the Business Logic Layer does, it just wants data formatted in a specific way. The Business Layer doesnt know what tables the DAL is accessing, it also just expects something in particular back.

      If implemented correctly, you can change each layer independently without really affecting the other layers. Thats why this design is so popular.

      You can move each layer to a different machine, or even multiple machines and distribute the load. This is a bit involved, so here is a quick search result I found that may help you:

    http://www.exforsys.com/tutorials/csharp/building-web-based-n-tier-applications-using-csharp.html

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Tuesday, March 9, 2010 4:13 PM

All replies

  • Tuesday, March 9, 2010 4:07 PM
  • User-1088661752 posted

    Hi,

      The traditional three tiered architecture is as you described in the latter. I've seen this called both n-Tier and Layered architecture.

      Your Presentation Layer is responsible for calling the Business Logic Layer. Your Business Logic Layer calls your Data Access Layer. Your Data Access Layer returns information back to your Business Logic Layer, which implements business rules (logic). Once your Business Logic layer has finished processing the data, it returns it to the Presentation Layer. So you can see it goes in a big circle.

      The layers are important, because they seperate concerns of the application. The Presentation layer does not care what the Business Logic Layer does, it just wants data formatted in a specific way. The Business Layer doesnt know what tables the DAL is accessing, it also just expects something in particular back.

      If implemented correctly, you can change each layer independently without really affecting the other layers. Thats why this design is so popular.

      You can move each layer to a different machine, or even multiple machines and distribute the load. This is a bit involved, so here is a quick search result I found that may help you:

    http://www.exforsys.com/tutorials/csharp/building-web-based-n-tier-applications-using-csharp.html

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Tuesday, March 9, 2010 4:13 PM
  • User-967169866 posted

    Three Tier Architecture:

    Browser / Client (Client Tier)
    Web Server (Application Tier)
    Database (Data Tier)

    Three Layer Architecture:

    Presentation (ASP.NET Web Forms)
    Business Layer (Business Logic)
    Data Layer (Data Access Layer - OR Mappers) 

     

    Tuesday, March 9, 2010 11:36 PM