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Career path RRS feed

  • Question

  • I am a Computer Engineer fresh graduate...

    Can I be a software architect without having good knowledge in programming or development as if i am a fresh graduate with banking experince?

     

    what is the best career path for me with a computer engineer degree and experince in banking (credit)?

     

    ur advise is highly appreciated.

     

    My Regards,

     

    Wednesday, April 30, 2008 6:00 PM

Answers

  • I think it would be tough to get a software architect position without having plenty of experience in development. You may have a theoretical knowledge of OO and SOA, but without experience building those systems I think it would be tough to design them.

     

    If you don't have good knowledge for OO programming, you will probably be starting off as a junior-level developer. After 2-3 years, you will be considered mid-level. Then after another 2-3 year, you will be considered senior level (this may vary by organization and definitely varies by how much time you put into learning outside of work). At that point, you will exhibit much of the knowledge and experience necessary to be an architect.

     

    Architectural knowledge will serve you well on your way up the "totem pole." Be sure to check out Skyscrapr.

     

    Be sure to continue your education outside of work. Participate in the development community. Attend user group meetings. Attend Code Camps. If you can, attend the pay conferences. Read and immerse yourself in the field.

     

    Good luck on your chosen career path =).

    Wednesday, April 30, 2008 6:23 PM
  • In order to become a successful architect you need to first get your hands onto coding. An architect should be able to demonstrate his concepts and ideas. To begin with give yourself 2-3 yrs into programming role. The path to an architect role looks like :

     

    1. Start as a Developer on one technology

    2. While working on one technology get yourself familiarize with other technologies as well. This will help you in making unbiased decisions later.

    3. After 2-3 yrs of development experience start giving inputs in design process and progress as a designer.

    4. Then lead the design process and step up as an architect.

     

    Gud luck with your career.

     

    Cheers

    Samir

    Thursday, May 1, 2008 5:01 AM
  •  

    Hi prince2015,

     

       don't want to look egomaniacal with this video but it was an interview that Channel 8, a resource for academic students interested on MS techs, made me last year

     

    Software architecture as a career: Diego Dagum's giving us some tips to get into Software architecture

     

       I think the walk I described there is pretty similar to the one my colleagues are telling you here. And I have two more thoughts to share:

     

    • You must definitely visit IASA, a vendor-neutral committee that is trying to put some order in the rules of the game to play the role of the architect
    • As the crowd already told, experience matters at a point that, if you try to get any of the available certifications on Software Architect, you'll have to present and defend before a board a project whose architecture was delegated to you

    Anyway, as Chinese people say, to traverse a long distance you must start by doing a first step!

    Wednesday, May 7, 2008 1:23 AM

All replies

  • I think it would be tough to get a software architect position without having plenty of experience in development. You may have a theoretical knowledge of OO and SOA, but without experience building those systems I think it would be tough to design them.

     

    If you don't have good knowledge for OO programming, you will probably be starting off as a junior-level developer. After 2-3 years, you will be considered mid-level. Then after another 2-3 year, you will be considered senior level (this may vary by organization and definitely varies by how much time you put into learning outside of work). At that point, you will exhibit much of the knowledge and experience necessary to be an architect.

     

    Architectural knowledge will serve you well on your way up the "totem pole." Be sure to check out Skyscrapr.

     

    Be sure to continue your education outside of work. Participate in the development community. Attend user group meetings. Attend Code Camps. If you can, attend the pay conferences. Read and immerse yourself in the field.

     

    Good luck on your chosen career path =).

    Wednesday, April 30, 2008 6:23 PM
  • Try the Architecture Role forum (up and across), there are a number of debates on this.

    [Edit] Sorry we're in that forum, I'll get my glasses!


    Wednesday, April 30, 2008 8:18 PM
  • It would really come down to how much experience you have had in the multitude of different commercial environments, and the chellenges that might become apparent in each.

     

    Experience gives you the justifications for your design choices and compomises, and on that basis I'd say that software architect is definitely not something you're likely to be ableto do well at your stage.

     

    If you get a job as a developer, possibly in finance with a bank perhaps, and you do well there, then you can revisit the question again in a few years time.  I think though during that time you will realise the amount of knowledge you would need to be able to be respected as a great architect, that makes the right choices.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Martin Platt.

    Wednesday, April 30, 2008 9:37 PM
  • In order to become a successful architect you need to first get your hands onto coding. An architect should be able to demonstrate his concepts and ideas. To begin with give yourself 2-3 yrs into programming role. The path to an architect role looks like :

     

    1. Start as a Developer on one technology

    2. While working on one technology get yourself familiarize with other technologies as well. This will help you in making unbiased decisions later.

    3. After 2-3 yrs of development experience start giving inputs in design process and progress as a designer.

    4. Then lead the design process and step up as an architect.

     

    Gud luck with your career.

     

    Cheers

    Samir

    Thursday, May 1, 2008 5:01 AM
  •  

    Hi prince2015,

     

       don't want to look egomaniacal with this video but it was an interview that Channel 8, a resource for academic students interested on MS techs, made me last year

     

    Software architecture as a career: Diego Dagum's giving us some tips to get into Software architecture

     

       I think the walk I described there is pretty similar to the one my colleagues are telling you here. And I have two more thoughts to share:

     

    • You must definitely visit IASA, a vendor-neutral committee that is trying to put some order in the rules of the game to play the role of the architect
    • As the crowd already told, experience matters at a point that, if you try to get any of the available certifications on Software Architect, you'll have to present and defend before a board a project whose architecture was delegated to you

    Anyway, as Chinese people say, to traverse a long distance you must start by doing a first step!

    Wednesday, May 7, 2008 1:23 AM
  •  

    Yup, you definitely needs to have good knowledge in programming or development..

     

    If you are not good with them, you risking the architecture design, architecturing also involves cost related issues so unless you know how much time it is gona take someone to code.. and a real or close to real time line you can only get with the hands on experience with coding..

     

    also knowing coding and programming has its advantages when doing architecture

    Tuesday, July 15, 2008 6:31 AM
  • Hmmm.... Not sure I agree with some of the answers here.

     

    You need to be able to code to be able to give good estimates, and thus be able to give costs, or budget for them.

     

    That statement would imply that project managers of software projects also need to be developers.  They do not, they only need to be able to get the right estimates.  They then need to break things down in such a way as to be able to be fairly sure that they have the tasks covered.  Feedback from said developer team is also important, but doesn't imply that the PM has developer knowledge either.

     

    I think that an architect can be good if they came from a business background, but had an understanding of how to put software together, without necessarily being able to code.  I agree that the best architect would quite probably be an ex-coder, but I definitely don't think that it is implied.  Logic is what is necessary, and an ability to follow a defined process. 

     

    I guess again we're talking about "the architect" and that could again mean a software architect that clearly would mean they need to know how to program, or a system architect, solution architect or whatever, and they wouldn't necessarily.  A deep understanding of a particular domain, enough to be able to model a system, and pass that model over to, or work in conjunction with software design / developer is all that is required.

     

    Having said that, if I was looking for an architect within my team, I would be looking for someone with software skills too, but that's a lot to do with the team structure, and size of company too.

     

    Hope that helps,

     

    Martin Platt.

     

    Monday, July 21, 2008 3:30 AM
  • From Wikipedia: The word "architect" comes from Latin architectus, which in turn derives from Greek arkhitekton (arkhi, chief + tekton, builder"). In its broadest sense, an architect is a person who translates a user's requirements into a built environment.

    Do we need more than that?

    As a sidenote - from now on it will be hard or impossible for a "pure" developer to become a MCA, as MS now has a Master as prereq for the MCA. And no master exam is in the works for developers...
    Thursday, July 31, 2008 2:07 PM
  • kindly provide more clarifications......I still didn't get your point yet.

     

    Thursday, July 31, 2008 2:12 PM