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Moving it from SketchFlow prototype to working app RRS feed

  • Question

  • I realize that the title of the post is something of a misnomer, since a SketchFlow app is a working application.  I hope that you'll excuse the loose term, there.  I've finished with the prototype and now want to remove all of the DynamicResource *-Sketch formatting to put in something that looks like a polished application.  And I'm wondering about all of the files and folders that comprise the SketchFlow project.  After all of the iterations to produce the prototype that the users like, I've got 105 files scattered through the 28 folders that comprise this simple 3 page and 1 component WPF SketchFlow project!  I don't know this for a fact, but I would think I could probably do without all of those files and folders.  For example, localization is not an issue for me; this application will only be used in our office and only in English.

    So, what do I need to start moving forward with developing the rest of the application and using it in Visual Studio?


    Rod
    Monday, April 12, 2010 8:13 PM

Answers

  • First, back up your project before you do any of this! :)

    There are a lot of ways you can go from here, and it depends largely on your individual situation, because the number of variables is so high. Since the number of actual resources you want to use are small, I would recommend you create a new application (non-SketchFlow) to be your production app, and migrate your controls there.

    Alternatively, there are instructions in the help file about converting your project in place to a production style app, using the Navigation App framework built into WPF/SL.

    To remove the Sketch formatting, just remove the style from each control (either delete it in xaml, or finding the style in the properties panel for the object and selecting reset after pressing the green box).

    Another option would be to use the Screens assembly (the 2nd one) as it exists now, and reference it in another project.  The same effect could be accomplished by remove the main project in the SketchFlow app, and adding a WPF application project, that references the screens assembly.

    If you need more guidance, tell us a bit more about your requirements and we can offer some advice.

    • Marked as answer by Rod at Work Tuesday, April 20, 2010 3:32 PM
    Tuesday, April 13, 2010 1:50 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • First, back up your project before you do any of this! :)

    There are a lot of ways you can go from here, and it depends largely on your individual situation, because the number of variables is so high. Since the number of actual resources you want to use are small, I would recommend you create a new application (non-SketchFlow) to be your production app, and migrate your controls there.

    Alternatively, there are instructions in the help file about converting your project in place to a production style app, using the Navigation App framework built into WPF/SL.

    To remove the Sketch formatting, just remove the style from each control (either delete it in xaml, or finding the style in the properties panel for the object and selecting reset after pressing the green box).

    Another option would be to use the Screens assembly (the 2nd one) as it exists now, and reference it in another project.  The same effect could be accomplished by remove the main project in the SketchFlow app, and adding a WPF application project, that references the screens assembly.

    If you need more guidance, tell us a bit more about your requirements and we can offer some advice.

    • Marked as answer by Rod at Work Tuesday, April 20, 2010 3:32 PM
    Tuesday, April 13, 2010 1:50 PM
    Moderator
  • Your suggestion of starting a new project and copying from the old one makes the most sense to me, in this situation.  I'll remove the Style formatting to get a plain format and then can come up with better, later.  I think the only thing significant thing I'll do, initially, will be to change each screen to a Page object instead of a UserControl.

    I guess the only thing I'm not sure about doing, moving forward, is should I start the project as a WPF project in Expression Blend first, or should I start it as a WPF project in VS 2008 first?

    Just re-read your first sentence.  Excellent advice!  I'll back it all up first, before I do anything else!


    Rod
    Wednesday, April 14, 2010 3:55 PM
  • For a basic WPF project, the templates should be almost identical between VS and Blend, so it shouldn't matter much which one you start with.
    Friday, April 16, 2010 4:27 PM
    Moderator
  • I've had to fight fires for the last week or so; thus I've not done anything on this project for at least a week.

    Chuck, I've got a quick question for you, that's related to this.  Since writing the original post in this tread on the 12th, I've installed VS 2010.  However, I don't have Expression Blend 4; and the SketchFlow project I have was done with Expression Blend 3.  Should I stick with VS 2008, so that I can use Expression Blend 3 with it?

     


    Rod
    Tuesday, April 20, 2010 3:36 PM
  • Yes, if you upgrade the project by opening it in VS 2010, you won't be able to open it in Blend 3 any longer.  VS 2010 = Blend 4, VS 2008 = Blend 3.  The file formats of the project files are not backwards compatible.  VS 2010 and Blend 4 can author both SL 3/4 and WPF 3/4.

     

    Tuesday, April 20, 2010 3:44 PM
    Moderator
  • Yes, if you upgrade the project by opening it in VS 2010, you won't be able to open it in Blend 3 any longer.  VS 2010 = Blend 4, VS 2008 = Blend 3.  The file formats of the project files are not backwards compatible.  VS 2010 and Blend 4 can author both SL 3/4 and WPF 3/4.

     


    OK, until we get Expression Blend 4 so I can use VS 2010, I think it would be best if I stay with VS 2008 & Expression Blend 3.

    Thank you, Chuck.


    Rod
    Tuesday, April 20, 2010 3:49 PM