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Question about Application Pool RRS feed

  • Question

  • User-1415763228 posted

    So, I did a little research about application pool, I've also read the MS technet article at http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/WindowsServer2003/Library/IIS/67e39bd8-317e-4cf6-b675-6431d4425248.mspx?mfr=true

    Many answers provided mention that the benefit of application pools is that if my application fails, it won't affect application running in other application pools on the same server.  For example here:

    http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3868612/what-is-an-iis-application-pool

    An application pool is a group of urls served by worker processors or set of worker processors.

    There can exist any number of application pools.

    In IIS it is possible to create more than one application pool.

    An application in different application pool runs in different worker processors.

    Advantage: If an error occurred in one application pool will not effect the applications running in another application pool.

    So, the assumption is that if one web application fails in application pool 1, it will cause other application running inside the same application pool to be unavailable, correct?

    Please clarify, Thank you.

    Saturday, September 28, 2013 8:50 PM

Answers

  • User281315223 posted

    Yes.

    If a major failure occurs within an application in a specific application pool all of the other applications within that same pool will be affected. This is due to the reason that all of the applications within a single application pool share system resources (the same resources). This same reason leads into your other question of some of the drawbacks of putting all of your applications within a single pool : performance.

    If you have multiple applications running in the same pool, all of these applications are going to be sharing system resources which if you have any resource-intensive applications could pose a problem to your other applications. You can find a few reasons of why you might want to use a different application pool below : 

    • Resources - As mentioned earlier, if your application is very resource-intensive it could hinder the performance of other applications within the pool.
    • Security - If you have an application that uses a specific set-up for security purposes, it may be best to place this within its own application-pool. This is especially true if any security settings are handled at the "application" level.
    • Communication - If two or more applications need to communicate quite regularly with one another (and only one another) you might want to place them within their own seperate application pool.
    • Stablity - Any applications that are less stable than others or may be prone to crashing might want to be placed in the own application pool simply to avoid conflicting with other applications when any errors occur.

    Obviously these are generalizations and may depend on your server-setup, available resources and other things but hopefully it helps clear a few things up.

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Sunday, September 29, 2013 6:24 PM

All replies

  • User-1716253493 posted
    I guess not for availability. It's depending what causing fail.
    Saturday, September 28, 2013 9:22 PM
  • User-1415763228 posted

    I guess not for availability. It's depending what causing fail.

    Thanks for trying to help, but please provide more complete information. So for example, if failure of one web app inside an application pool will not affect the availability of other web applications inside the same application pool, what will be affected?  What are the drawbacks of putting all of my web applications inside one application pool?

    Sunday, September 29, 2013 6:08 PM
  • User281315223 posted

    Yes.

    If a major failure occurs within an application in a specific application pool all of the other applications within that same pool will be affected. This is due to the reason that all of the applications within a single application pool share system resources (the same resources). This same reason leads into your other question of some of the drawbacks of putting all of your applications within a single pool : performance.

    If you have multiple applications running in the same pool, all of these applications are going to be sharing system resources which if you have any resource-intensive applications could pose a problem to your other applications. You can find a few reasons of why you might want to use a different application pool below : 

    • Resources - As mentioned earlier, if your application is very resource-intensive it could hinder the performance of other applications within the pool.
    • Security - If you have an application that uses a specific set-up for security purposes, it may be best to place this within its own application-pool. This is especially true if any security settings are handled at the "application" level.
    • Communication - If two or more applications need to communicate quite regularly with one another (and only one another) you might want to place them within their own seperate application pool.
    • Stablity - Any applications that are less stable than others or may be prone to crashing might want to be placed in the own application pool simply to avoid conflicting with other applications when any errors occur.

    Obviously these are generalizations and may depend on your server-setup, available resources and other things but hopefully it helps clear a few things up.

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Sunday, September 29, 2013 6:24 PM
  • User-1415763228 posted

    Yes.

    If a major failure occurs within an application in a specific application pool all of the other applications within that same pool will be affected. This is due to the reason that all of the applications within a single application pool share system resources (the same resources). This same reason leads into your other question of some of the drawbacks of putting all of your applications within a single pool : performance.

    If you have multiple applications running in the same pool, all of these applications are going to be sharing system resources which if you have any resource-intensive applications could pose a problem to your other applications. You can find a few reasons of why you might want to use a different application pool below : 

    • Resources - As mentioned earlier, if your application is very resource-intensive it could hinder the performance of other applications within the pool.
    • Security - If you have an application that uses a specific set-up for security purposes, it may be best to place this within its own application-pool. This is especially true if any security settings are handled at the "application" level.
    • Communication - If two or more applications need to communicate quite regularly with one another (and only one another) you might want to place them within their own seperate application pool.
    • Stablity - Any applications that are less stable than others or may be prone to crashing might want to be placed in the own application pool simply to avoid conflicting with other applications when any errors occur.

    Obviously these are generalizations and may depend on your server-setup, available resources and other things but hopefully it helps clear a few things up.

    Thank you very much. This is really helpful.

    Sunday, September 29, 2013 6:27 PM