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Why must we jump through hoops just to display a map? RRS feed

  • Question

  • OK I'm new to using maps in applications so excuse me if I appear naïve. But I just navigated to this page and frankly I'm dumbfounded.

    So to develop and test ideas for Store apps I must go through that arduous process in order to use a map?

    Clearly if I'm prototyping then I won't have an actual defined "app name" will I? No, so I'll need a "trial" key.

    Also I really don't understand whether I need a "Trial" key or a "Basic" key - the documentation on that page is almost useless insofar as understanding what the difference is.

    For Basic is says "Application is a Windows Store app that is available to consumers or available internally for free instructional non-commercial use."

    Well if I'm prototyping then my app clearly isn't available to consumers and may never be - because I'm exploring the technology, so "Basic" sounds wrong, but "Trial" isn't clear either I mean that says "and will operate within the terms and limits described in the Terms of Use" what terms of use? why is there no URL to these terms of use?

    A "Trial" key expires after 90 days but it seems a "Basic" key does not - nowhere does it say what - if any - functional differences there are between these two types of key.

    Can I do something with one kind of key that I can't do with another kind of key?

    Microsoft keep claiming that they want to help developers and that this is important for them to gain traction and increase market share but if there are hurdles, mysteries, idiosyncrasies emerging almost every day as we use and learn these technologies then surely this is only antagonizing that effort?

    I'm really growing tired of this mish-mash of complexity and never ending change and updates, version, etc etc

    Cap'n


    Thursday, October 3, 2013 4:29 PM

Answers

  • It's actually pretty easy. The information is right there in the documentation. A couple of points to clear things up.

    • The application name can be anything you want, its for your own reference so you can remember what the key is for if you have more than one key.
    • The application URL is optional and again only for your own information so you can remember what the key is for.
    • Trial keys should only be used if you plan on testing out the service for a short period of time or your application is an internal application or asset tracking application. Trial keys are also useful if you are handing off code to someone else and you don't want them to run up a bunch of transactions on your account and you being left with the bill.
    • Basic keys are the main key used for development. These are the main keys you would use for apps that fall under the free terms of use. They do not expire, only trial keys do (thus the name trial). Note, to qualify for the free terms of use that final app must be public facing and not exceed the free transaction limits. Internal and asset tracking applications do not qualify for free terms of use and must be licensed.
    • Enterprise keys are for licensed accounts. They will not show up as an option in your account unless you have licensed Bing Maps.

    There are a lot of different applications out there. Most applications fall into the public website or public facing app category. For those you use a Basic key if the usage is less than the free terms of use.

    Other applications have to be licensed and that's where all the other application types come in.

    Note that unlike many Microsoft products, Bing Maps is one of those tools that can be used in any application. As such there has to be a lot more options when it comes to the licensing (free and paid) and thus all the options you see when creating a key.

    All that said, this is a very easy process and we rarely have complaints about it. If you are creating a key for an app that falls under the free terms of use it shouldn't take more than 5 minutes to create a key. Also, once you create a basic key, as long as it doesn't exceed the free terms of use regularly you only have to create it once and you can use it for as long as Bing Maps uses keys.


    http://rbrundritt.wordpress.com

    Thursday, October 3, 2013 8:15 PM
  • 1) If you exceed the limits you don't get billed. If you exceed the limits regularly then someone will try and contact you about licensing going forward. If an agreement is not made then your account would be turned off.

    2) The costs vary on a number of factors such as the type of application; internal, public facing, asset tracking. The volume of expected usage also makes a difference along with the number of users accessing the system if licensing as an internal application. Normally the cost/transaction becomes lower with the more transactions you license. To get a quote, contact the licensing team at maplic@microsoft.com or through the contact us page: http://www.microsoft.com/maps/contact-us.aspx

    3) Start off with a basic key for windows store apps. These keys have a free usage limit of 50,000 transactions a day which is usually more than enough for most windows 8 applications when they are initially launched. If your app takes off and starts getting a few thousand downloads then check the reports in the Bing Maps portal to see what your transaction usage is like. If it is up around 30,000 or 40,000 total transactions (billable and non-billable) then start considering getting a license. Note that if you do nothing and let the app go and it gets constant usage that exceed the free terms of use someone will try and contact you about this to discuss licensing, if they can't get a hold of you or an agreement is not made then the account may be turned off. Also note that if you do license the platform you will need to create an enterprise key and update your app to use that.

    Also, there are some great tools on the main Microsoft Bing Maps page here which might be easier then reading through all the indepth documentation:

    http://www.microsoft.com/maps/Licensing/licensing.aspx

    http://www.microsoft.com/maps/create-a-bing-maps-key.aspx


    http://rbrundritt.wordpress.com

    Saturday, October 5, 2013 8:50 AM

All replies

  • It's actually pretty easy. The information is right there in the documentation. A couple of points to clear things up.

    • The application name can be anything you want, its for your own reference so you can remember what the key is for if you have more than one key.
    • The application URL is optional and again only for your own information so you can remember what the key is for.
    • Trial keys should only be used if you plan on testing out the service for a short period of time or your application is an internal application or asset tracking application. Trial keys are also useful if you are handing off code to someone else and you don't want them to run up a bunch of transactions on your account and you being left with the bill.
    • Basic keys are the main key used for development. These are the main keys you would use for apps that fall under the free terms of use. They do not expire, only trial keys do (thus the name trial). Note, to qualify for the free terms of use that final app must be public facing and not exceed the free transaction limits. Internal and asset tracking applications do not qualify for free terms of use and must be licensed.
    • Enterprise keys are for licensed accounts. They will not show up as an option in your account unless you have licensed Bing Maps.

    There are a lot of different applications out there. Most applications fall into the public website or public facing app category. For those you use a Basic key if the usage is less than the free terms of use.

    Other applications have to be licensed and that's where all the other application types come in.

    Note that unlike many Microsoft products, Bing Maps is one of those tools that can be used in any application. As such there has to be a lot more options when it comes to the licensing (free and paid) and thus all the options you see when creating a key.

    All that said, this is a very easy process and we rarely have complaints about it. If you are creating a key for an app that falls under the free terms of use it shouldn't take more than 5 minutes to create a key. Also, once you create a basic key, as long as it doesn't exceed the free terms of use regularly you only have to create it once and you can use it for as long as Bing Maps uses keys.


    http://rbrundritt.wordpress.com

    Thursday, October 3, 2013 8:15 PM
  • It's actually pretty easy. The information is right there in the documentation. A couple of points to clear things up.

    • The application name can be anything you want, its for your own reference so you can remember what the key is for if you have more than one key.
    • The application URL is optional and again only for your own information so you can remember what the key is for.
    • Trial keys should only be used if you plan on testing out the service for a short period of time or your application is an internal application or asset tracking application. Trial keys are also useful if you are handing off code to someone else and you don't want them to run up a bunch of transactions on your account and you being left with the bill.
    • Basic keys are the main key used for development. These are the main keys you would use for apps that fall under the free terms of use. They do not expire, only trial keys do (thus the name trial). Note, to qualify for the free terms of use that final app must be public facing and not exceed the free transaction limits. Internal and asset tracking applications do not qualify for free terms of use and must be licensed.
    • Enterprise keys are for licensed accounts. They will not show up as an option in your account unless you have licensed Bing Maps.

    There are a lot of different applications out there. Most applications fall into the public website or public facing app category. For those you use a Basic key if the usage is less than the free terms of use.

    Other applications have to be licensed and that's where all the other application types come in.

    Note that unlike many Microsoft products, Bing Maps is one of those tools that can be used in any application. As such there has to be a lot more options when it comes to the licensing (free and paid) and thus all the options you see when creating a key.

    All that said, this is a very easy process and we rarely have complaints about it. If you are creating a key for an app that falls under the free terms of use it shouldn't take more than 5 minutes to create a key. Also, once you create a basic key, as long as it doesn't exceed the free terms of use regularly you only have to create it once and you can use it for as long as Bing Maps uses keys.


    http://rbrundritt.wordpress.com

    Thanks for explaining that - I see there are costs associated with the service and I then visited this page.

    I have to say that this page is quite bewildering because one needs to review the terms of service which themselves are rather involved.

    For example one will be billed for using the service for "Evaluation" (after 10,000 txns (every 30 days)) but for "Limited Public Website Use" one gets billed after 125,000 txns (no 30 day cycle).

    So my new questions are:

    1. What kind of key should I get to avoid being billed when prototyping here at my home office?

    2. Exactly what does it cost (in dollars) if/when someone is actually billed?

    3. If I created an app and publish it in the app store for a price (not a free app) then what kind of key should I get and do I get billed if thousands of customers use that app and its map features?

    Thanks (and sorry for so many questions)

    Cap'n


    Friday, October 4, 2013 4:10 PM
  • 1) If you exceed the limits you don't get billed. If you exceed the limits regularly then someone will try and contact you about licensing going forward. If an agreement is not made then your account would be turned off.

    2) The costs vary on a number of factors such as the type of application; internal, public facing, asset tracking. The volume of expected usage also makes a difference along with the number of users accessing the system if licensing as an internal application. Normally the cost/transaction becomes lower with the more transactions you license. To get a quote, contact the licensing team at maplic@microsoft.com or through the contact us page: http://www.microsoft.com/maps/contact-us.aspx

    3) Start off with a basic key for windows store apps. These keys have a free usage limit of 50,000 transactions a day which is usually more than enough for most windows 8 applications when they are initially launched. If your app takes off and starts getting a few thousand downloads then check the reports in the Bing Maps portal to see what your transaction usage is like. If it is up around 30,000 or 40,000 total transactions (billable and non-billable) then start considering getting a license. Note that if you do nothing and let the app go and it gets constant usage that exceed the free terms of use someone will try and contact you about this to discuss licensing, if they can't get a hold of you or an agreement is not made then the account may be turned off. Also note that if you do license the platform you will need to create an enterprise key and update your app to use that.

    Also, there are some great tools on the main Microsoft Bing Maps page here which might be easier then reading through all the indepth documentation:

    http://www.microsoft.com/maps/Licensing/licensing.aspx

    http://www.microsoft.com/maps/create-a-bing-maps-key.aspx


    http://rbrundritt.wordpress.com

    Saturday, October 5, 2013 8:50 AM