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Windows Store and metro apps question

    General discussion

  • I have a question about the store.

    I hear left and right that the only way to install metro applications is through the windows store.

    I can understand this when it comes to consumer applications, but what about enterprise level applications?  Or what about private applications I write for myself (thus not meant to be distributed)?

    Consider this scenario:

    At the company where I work, we have a lot of data in a datawarehouse.  We currently have a silverlight application to query it in a user-friendly way.  Suppose we get windows 8 tablets for every employee...  We would want to rewrite this application metro style.

    This application would (or at least could) be tailored specifically to our environment.  So it would effectively render it useless for anyone outside the compnay.  SO this is not a commercial nore public application and in essence, it has no business being on a public store.

    Does this mean that we would need to put it in the store anyway before we can distribute it to our employee machines?  Or will there be an alternative (in combination with windows server perhaps)?

    I can go a step further and say that I could create an application which is only for my own use.  It wouldn't be the first time I do that.  So would I need to upload it to the store, only to download it again to be able to install it?

    Consider LOB custom projects as well...  We always write software for one specific customer.  Do we need to deploy this highly custom software, specifically tailored for use in a specific company in a specific setting with specific authentication etc, to the store before the customer is able to use it?

    Seems kind of strange.  I wonder if there are mechanisms in place that offer work-arounds where applicable.

     


    Thursday, September 22, 2011 7:17 AM

All replies

  • Windows 8 will be "consumer electronics quality" (http://blogs.msdn.com/b/b8/archive/2011/09/20/reengineering-the-windows-boot-experience.aspx), fluid, reimagined, seemless and no-compromise [it seems like they have learned some new words at English classes]. That's all we know for now, whatever it means as they rarely mentioned facts for these silly marketing phrases. They completely ignored businesses and their needs at Build. Every single piece at Build was about Metro and tailored for "home" users (plus a few not very important topics from server and azure worlds).

    The only known way which works now is the Developer License which needs to be reaquired each year (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/apps/hh465430(v=vs.85).aspx).

    You can also check http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/BUILD/BUILD2011/APP-121T whether there is something on your topic.

    Microsoft is quite silent about topics other than Metro&Fluid.


    • Edited by MCCZ Thursday, September 22, 2011 7:38 AM
    Thursday, September 22, 2011 7:37 AM
  • On Thu, 22 Sep 2011 07:17:51 +0000, Aroush wrote:

    I hear left and right that the only way to install metro applications is through the windows store.

    I can understand this when it comes to consumer applications, but what about enterprise level applications?? Or what about private applications I write for myself (thus not meant to be distributed)?

    Then you haven't been following the correct web sites/blogs/news reports.
    Everything coming directly from Microsoft has indicated the exact opposite,
    that is, that enterprise and developers will in fact be able to side load
    their apps. Only consumers will be tied to the store.


    Paul Adare
    MVP - Identity Lifecycle Manager
    http://www.identit.ca
    Where the system is concerned, you are not allowed to ask "Why?".

    Thursday, September 22, 2011 8:56 AM
  • You can also check http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/BUILD/BUILD2011/APP-121T whether there is something on your topic.


    Indeed.  At 10:00, when talking about windows store being the only store to distribute metro apps, he says that there is a way for sideloading for developers and '...there is also an enterprise story to support their needs...'
    And I have a feeling that that is all that will be said about it for the time being, which would be very unsatisfying and really strange.  I'ld guess that the vast majority of windows developers out there are into line of business applications, not angry birds.

    I'm still watching the rest of the session, so perhaps I'll get lucky.  Somehow, I doubt it.

    I want to know what the "enterprise story" looks and sounds like.

    I'ld also want to know if "private cloud LOB applications" also are subject to the same certification process prior to deployment on employee machines (who aren't developers and thus would not have developer licenses).

    Thursday, September 22, 2011 9:02 AM
  • Then you haven't been following the correct web sites/blogs/news reports.
    Everything coming directly from Microsoft has indicated the exact opposite,
    that is, that enterprise and developers will in fact be able to side load
    their apps. Only consumers will be tied to the store.


     


    As I understood it, this 'sideloading' is meant primarily for developers to test their applications and would require developer licenses.  I guess they have an equivalent for this on enterprise level so that a secretary or sales dude doesn't need a developer license.

    I'm wondering though how that setup/architecture looks like.  I'ld expect that the enterprise would require some Store equivalent from where to distribute in-house applications to employees. 

    Thursday, September 22, 2011 9:16 AM
  • What about this scenario?...

    I work for a business school at a state university.  We have a "Dean's Council" (DC) of CEOs and other big-wig alumni (located all around the world) who advise our dean.  Currently, I've written a private, web "portal" application that allows our DC members to RSVP to meetings and events, make travel and accomodation arrangements, and also message each other in a very "facebook wall" kind of way.

    I'd really like to write and distribute this functionality to our DC as a metro style app (or apps), but am unsure how we would go about distributing it.

    Our DC is really not "enterprise-wide", and I certainly couldn't physically install it on any number of devices located all around the world, so it seems distributing it (for free) through the App Store is really the way to go if possible...  Will the App Store support the concept of a "private app" that only certain (windows live) users could even get access to?


    Wednesday, October 05, 2011 7:02 PM