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Microsoft solver foundation 3.1 academic license RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi everybody,

    I use MSF for my master thesis and I am limited by standard license. I tried to look for academic license online on MS Imagine Hub with free software for students but without any result. Is there any possibility to get the student (academic license)?

    Thanks!

    Regards!

    • Moved by CoolDadTx Thursday, March 8, 2018 3:13 PM Not C# related
    Wednesday, March 7, 2018 11:25 PM

Answers

  • MSF hasn't really be an active product for a number of years. The last news about it was from May 2012 (in the announcements of this MSF forum). I do recall that there was an academic license back then, but I'd say the chances of you finding a way to get one now are slim to none. That's just reality. Because of this situation, most people have probably moved on to other optimization solutions. I couldn't tell you what they've gone to or what other options are, because I haven't really looked as the free version of MSF suits my needs.

    I'm sorry to be the bearer of band news, but it is probably best for you to know this sooner than later. I'll also mention that the likelihood of getting other replies on this forum is pretty low too. It seems like I'm the only person who occasionally looks and replies here anymore.

    • Marked as answer by Aldas99 Sunday, March 11, 2018 4:53 PM
    Friday, March 9, 2018 2:16 PM

All replies

  • MSF hasn't really be an active product for a number of years. The last news about it was from May 2012 (in the announcements of this MSF forum). I do recall that there was an academic license back then, but I'd say the chances of you finding a way to get one now are slim to none. That's just reality. Because of this situation, most people have probably moved on to other optimization solutions. I couldn't tell you what they've gone to or what other options are, because I haven't really looked as the free version of MSF suits my needs.

    I'm sorry to be the bearer of band news, but it is probably best for you to know this sooner than later. I'll also mention that the likelihood of getting other replies on this forum is pretty low too. It seems like I'm the only person who occasionally looks and replies here anymore.

    • Marked as answer by Aldas99 Sunday, March 11, 2018 4:53 PM
    Friday, March 9, 2018 2:16 PM
  • Thanks for your answer. BTW do you know (approximately) should take constraint programming problem with about 160 constraints? Because on my i3 machine it didn't solve the problem in 12 hrs...

    I mean did the Solve() function has some feedback when it is continually running? How can I recognize that the solution is infeasible?

    Thanks. 

    • Edited by Aldas99 Monday, March 12, 2018 7:57 AM
    Monday, March 12, 2018 7:33 AM
  • I couldn't tell you. My application has 1 constraint. I also don't have a background in optimization models, so your model is going to be out of my league. An i3 processor does seem underpowered for what you are trying to do, but I don't know if an i5, i7, or a Ryzen would do much better. I don't recall MSF being multi-threaded, especially when processing one model. I know there were questions way back when about it, but I don't think anything really came of them. From a hardware standpoint, I'd suggest tossing a cpu at it with the fastest core clock speed you can. From a model standpoint, I'd suggest testing out a smaller scale model to make sure your setup is working properly (not sure if this is possible or not).

    Looking at the available classes, you may be able to tap into the SolverContext.Solving event, depending on which solver is being used. It looks like it can provide some feedback while the model is being processed. Hopefully this helps out.


    • Edited by Knif Monday, March 12, 2018 1:04 PM Added class for Solving event
    Monday, March 12, 2018 1:01 PM