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Windows Compatibility Versions RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi, I'm doing a university work about the Microsoft Windows.

    My questions are:
    -
    Why the current programs that run on Windows XP, Vista and 7 do not work in Windows NT 4.0?
    -I would like to know which files define the Windows compatibility?
    So, the programs are several, such as Adobe Reader, a message that says: "you need Windows 2000 or successor to work"(this in Windows NT 4.0).


    Thank!

    Friday, February 17, 2012 1:14 AM

All replies

  • Every version of Windows adds new features - when you write a program, you have to pick the "minimum" version you want to support.

    If you use any of the features that were added in Windows Vista, for example, your program will fail on XP.

    Depending on your development environment, you can see this in different ways.  For example, if you wanted to use the SetThreadAffinityMask function (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/ms686247(v=vs.85).aspx), you would need Windows 2000 or higher (see at the bottom where it says "Minimum Client Version" and "Minimum Server Version").  However, if you want to use SetThreadIdealProcessorEx (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/dd405517(v=vs.85).aspx), you would need to have Windows 7 or later, as this function was added to Windows in Windows 7, and isn't available in earlier versions.

    This is something that developers choose to do - you're making a tradeoff here.  The more "modern" features you want to support, the more you give up compatibility with older operating systems (in general).

     

    Also, at some point, Microsoft eventually stops supporting old Operating Systems, like Windows NT 4.0.  At some point, if you want to use the latest development tools, the tools create programs with requirements that no longer support old operating systems, like Windows NT 4.0...


    Reed Copsey, Jr. - http://reedcopsey.com
    If a post answers your question, please click "Mark As Answer" on that post and "Mark as Helpful".

    Friday, February 17, 2012 1:24 AM
  • thanks for the help!

    And one more question, how can I study deeper into the Microsoft Operating Systems?
    In this case, as was done.
    There is the Windows source code to study?

    Thanks!!!

    Friday, February 17, 2012 1:34 AM
  • No - there is no source code available.

    You can study the Windows API on MSDN (see the links above) to see the changes to the development environment, however.


    Reed Copsey, Jr. - http://reedcopsey.com
    If a post answers your question, please click "Mark As Answer" on that post and "Mark as Helpful".

    Friday, February 17, 2012 1:36 AM
  • Ok, thank you very much!
    Friday, February 17, 2012 1:44 AM
  • thanks for the help!

    And one more question, how can I study deeper into the Microsoft Operating Systems?
    In this case, as was done.
    There is the Windows source code to study?

    Thanks!!!

    You could study the Windows API on MSDN and read a book like Windows Internals (http://shop.oreilly.com/product/9780735625303.do).

    Bye.


    Luigi Bruno - Microsoft Community Contributor 2011 Award

    Friday, February 24, 2012 9:16 AM