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Opening and Closing apps

    Question

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    Hello

    How is it possible to close the app that you open?

    For example on the desktop you can close the internet explorer with the X or with alt F4

    But when you open in the Metro Gui ( internet explorer)  I can only alt-tab or press the windows key to go back.  The the internet explorer stays open.  you cant alt f4 to close it. This is also the same with games the stay open.

    Friday, September 16, 2011 9:50 AM

Answers

  • The OS will manage the application lifetime.  If you are developing and wish to terminate a process you can use task manager to close your Metro Style application.  The intent however is to allow the OS to manage application lifetime and not burden the user with this.  The OS can and will suspend an application that is not exposing itself in UI so that CPU cycles are not being used and other applications can utilize the processor.
    Jeff Sanders (MSFT)
    Friday, September 16, 2011 2:34 PM

All replies

  • The OS will manage the application lifetime.  If you are developing and wish to terminate a process you can use task manager to close your Metro Style application.  The intent however is to allow the OS to manage application lifetime and not burden the user with this.  The OS can and will suspend an application that is not exposing itself in UI so that CPU cycles are not being used and other applications can utilize the processor.
    Jeff Sanders (MSFT)
    Friday, September 16, 2011 2:34 PM
  • Uhm... I think which is better to "hide" the suspended app, or give the possibility to the user who not want to use an application, to close it definitely and remove from the "app slide" or alt+tab method... Actually for a desktop user is only a waste of time...
    Friday, September 16, 2011 4:22 PM
  • I second the opinion that it would be nice to have a touch way of closing metro app. Given the fact that task switching is only sequential it id a bother to flip through apps I no longer need.

     

    It also would be uber  nice to have task bar charm to directly go to the app i need. There is plenty of space there for it

    Friday, September 16, 2011 9:55 PM
  • Please Change this!!!!! You will have very many confused, and very unhappy customers on your hands if you keep it this way. There are a lot of developers that aren't happy with this. I'm sure your typicall user will hate it. When I'm done using an app, I want to close it. I don't want to leave it hanging around. I don't care what the OS is doing, to the user, it looks like I'm wasting resources and keeping things open that I don't want open. I like a lot of the design choices made with Windows 8, but this is a ridiculous decision that should be fixed.

    Please consider changing this feature to allow users to close an application. If the user doesn't close, the OS can manage the app lifetime, but please allow us to manage it ourselves if that's what we want.

     

    Thanks!!


    • Edited by hmaprk Monday, September 19, 2011 2:42 PM
    Monday, September 19, 2011 2:41 PM
  • Stay tuned :-).  This is only the developer preview and there WILL be changes as we move closer to beta.  I feel your pain, trust me!
    Jeff Sanders (MSFT)
    Monday, September 19, 2011 2:46 PM
  • It does make sense for the user to not have to continually flip through apps that they don't want open anymore. If a specific charm or app icon is not used, then maybe a certain gesture to kill the app such as dragging the app downwards off the bottom of the screen?

    Good feedback by the posters above. :)


    • Edited by Dave_Lock Wednesday, September 21, 2011 11:37 AM
    Wednesday, September 21, 2011 11:34 AM
  • Stay tuned :-).  This is only the developer preview and there WILL be changes as we move closer to beta.  I feel your pain, trust me!
    Jeff Sanders (MSFT)

    You're my new hero. This is a PC and not a phone. It should provide things only a PC can do. The flipping-through-app-I-don't-care-about issue is the number on reason to implement a close feature. if I play a game at lunch I certainly don't want it to appear as I'm switching through apps during a meeting later.
    Wednesday, September 21, 2011 8:56 PM
  • Closing an app is not necessary. We still think "old-school" apps. For the metro user closing an app is something they never have to do or even think about.

    That being said, I agree that we could use a better way to browse through running apps. The current solution (swiping from left to right) isn't enough: I don't want to go through all the running apps, I want to be able to choose the one I want to see. Maybe have a charm for this?


    Dennis Vroegop Destrato Microsoft MVP Surface
    Thursday, September 22, 2011 11:48 AM
  • Closing an app is not necessary. We still think "old-school" apps. For the metro user closing an app is something they never have to do or even think about.

    But why would lifetime/execution model for apps on a truly multi-tasking machine (i.e. PC, with who knows how many cores still to come to even basic models) need to be modeled after processing and power-restricted devices (i.e. phones) where apps are by necessity "simple" and thus can be left of OS to manage? And even on my smartphone I would sometimes like to shut down applications explicitly, like internet browser (because they consume CPU and RAM having page content loaded into memory); instead I need to start a task manager application to terminate it.

    But especially on a PC, people are accustomed closing apps as they see fit regardless of the interface technology being slammed on front.

     


    br,
    Kalle Saunamäki
    Thursday, September 22, 2011 8:38 PM
  • Dennis,

    Please do not make the mistake of assuming that anyone who is not satisfied with the new "features" like system-managed lifecycle are simply stuck in the past or don't like change. There are very good reasons for doubting whether this system will work on the desktop.

    1) You already mentioned the task management issue.

    2) The system will only close apps when it detects a need to reclaim the memory. This means either

      a) Waiting until all or nearly all of the system memory is used before closing apps. This means that apps are trying to shutdown - which often requires temporarily allocating additional memory - in an already memory constrained environment.

    OR

      b) Shutting down apps before the system becomes significantly memory constrained, which would effectively mean that the system is never making full use of the memory available.

    3) When it needs more memory, the system has to rely on a heuristic to pick an app to shutdown. My guess is that it will close the oldest app first (has this heuristic been described anywhere?). The problem is that no matter what heuristic it uses, it will likely be wrong a significant percentage of the time: it will close an app that the user intends to use again soon, while leaving open apps that the user does not intend to use. The problem is that the system is cutting out the best source of information it has about which apps need to be open and which don't: the user.

    I think one of the problems they are having is that they want Metro apps to run with "no chrome": where the entire screen surface is taken up by the app itself. So there is no place to put a standard close button. They could still reserve a keyboard shortcut (i.e. Alt+F4), but it is a generally accepted UI design guideline that any command that you can invoke with the keyboard, you should be able to invoke without the keyboard, which is even more important in touch-first environments. They could let applications close themselves via an app-specific command, but then every app has its own way of closing, which creates inconsistency and confusion in the ecosystem.

    Frankly, although I can understand the motivation behind the "no chome" goal, I think a small amount of chome is valuable, precisely for the reason that it creates a standard way of interacting with the application. However, since they have touted "no chrome" so much, I doubt that they will reconsider it now, even with the massive outcry for a close button. More likely, they will create an app manager similar to what is seen on other devices, which will allow the user to close the app from outside the app itself. Unfortunately, because it is outside the app, I doubt that most users will use it, which means they will end up suffering the inefficiencies I described above, without realizing why.


    Moderator | MCTS .NET 2.0 Web Applications | My Blog: http://www.commongenius.com
    Thursday, September 22, 2011 9:21 PM
  • I see the added value of a way of closing apps. I would love to see an overview of all running apps and then being able to close them from there. Shouldn't be to hard to implement at all. Just a set of tiles, just like they do in WP7 Mango.

    But... I don't see any need for a close button or anything like that in the application itself. When I said "old school", I meant pre-metro. If we get low priced devices I think it's possible that they will be Metro only, so no traditional desktop will be available. In that scenario the average user doesn't think about closing apps. They don't care about that in WP7 either. Don't forget: people here aren't the typical users. We know a lot more about how systems work than, let's say, my parents do. My parents don't care about closing apps at all. They don't know about the memory pressure or about the processor time a running app takes.

    I have had this discussion several times before when I develop Surface software. Developers and hardcore users want to know how to close an application running on Surface, most users don't even think about asking that question. We'll get the same with Metro. If the OS is used as a tablet-only version of Windows the average user won't need a close button anywhere.

    But again: some way of seeing of overview of all running apps and then close them from there would be usefull. But hey, the version we've got right now is only the developer preview. Let's hope the beta will have something like this :-)


    Dennis Vroegop Destrato Microsoft MVP Surface Please mark an answer as "answered" if it does help you!
    Friday, September 23, 2011 7:02 AM
  •  if I play a game at lunch I certainly don't want it to appear as I'm switching through apps during a meeting later.

    This.
    Friday, September 23, 2011 10:30 AM
  • Closing an app is not necessary. We still think "old-school" apps. For the metro user closing an app is something they never have to do or even think about.


    There is no reason at all to take this control out of the user's hands.

    Yes, iCrapola and droids work this way.  So bloody what?  This is windows baby.  People expect certain things when they use a product of the windows franchise.  One of those things is being able to close applications when you are done with them.

    I think the live cycle management is cool and it should remain in place.

    But there is no reason at all to not include a freaking close button on applications.

    Friday, September 23, 2011 10:35 AM
  • I have had this discussion several times before when I develop Surface software

    Surface is not a product that is being marketed as the next version of windows. So whatever surface does or however it works is basicly irrelavent here.
    Friday, September 23, 2011 10:37 AM
  • I have had this discussion several times before when I develop Surface software

    Surface is not a product that is being marketed as the next version of windows. So whatever surface does or however it works is basicly irrelavent here.

    It is. Surface is based on Natural User Interface. Surface 2.0 apps are Metro style. The way people interact with the software is the same as they do on the Windows Phone and as they will with Metro apps on Win8. So it is relevant.
    Dennis Vroegop Destrato Microsoft MVP Surface Please mark an answer as "answered" if it does help you!
    Friday, September 23, 2011 10:42 AM
  • I still disagree.  Not only for Surface but also for the phone and Xbox.

    None of them are claimed to be the next version of windows.  So nobody expects these things to act like windows (they will in the future, when windows 8 becomes mainstream).  Windows might borrow ideas from these platforms in terms of styling, but it still is windows.

    Surface, phone and xbox != windows.

    My PC is not a phone and windows is not the OS of a glorified media player.


    The technology from these platforms (surface, xbox and phone) should be used to enrich windows, not to dumb it down.
    Friday, September 23, 2011 10:48 AM
  • "the average user doesn't think about closing apps"

    I disagree. Closing apps has been ingrained into every computer user for at least the last three decades. I fully expect my 60-year-old technology illiterate mother to ask as one of her very first questions the first time she uses a Metro app: "How do I close it?" She's going to want to close the app, because she will quickly figure out that if she doesn't, it will interfere with her ability to switch between apps (yes, even my 60-year-old technology illiterate mother is a multi-tasker; most people are). And when I tell her that she can't actually close the app from within the app itself, but rather leave the app and go to a different interface for "app management" to close it, she isn't going to think it's a cool user interface innovation; she's going to think it's annoying.

    "If the OS is used as a tablet-only version of Windows the average user won't need a close button anywhere."

    The fact that other mobile devices, notably the iPhone and the iPad, were forced to add an app manager which allowed users to close apps due to user demand would seem to contradict that prediction.

    Moreoever, we're NOT just talking about tablet-only; we're talking about the desktop, which is still where Windows will primarily be used for a while to come.


    Moderator | MCTS .NET 2.0 Web Applications | My Blog: http://www.commongenius.com
    Friday, September 23, 2011 3:57 PM
  • the only need is add a X on the left top in the apps, you want to close press X simple.

    the simple user don't like a difficult options and this could be a problem.

    if the user cant simple close app the memory be full faster and pom! blue screen.

    not all user knows use Task manager >.>

    PC is not a mobile Device.

    Thanks !

    Saturday, September 24, 2011 3:43 AM
  • Interesting that people say things without trying them.

    Open e.g. Tweet@rama. Press Alt+F4. Press Windows key.

    It's not pretty, but it does work. Of course, this area of Windows 8 is going to be enhanced. Don't fret just yet, those betas are coming!

    Tuesday, September 27, 2011 7:50 PM
  • I believe there are many apps that need closing. The first that come to mind are video & audio apps that you need to turn off when you are finished using them. When I go to a meeting I need to be able to kill something like Pandora instead of having to turn down the system volume which might effect other things I may need audio for.

    Pandora is nice because it does provide a Quit feature, the only problem is that without a standard location in apps for shutdown I find shutdown options in all kinds of places. Some only on the app menu, some on the app main screen, etc.

    Unless the MS team has found a much better solution for handling memory than the Android & Apple developers, the systems do get bogged down the more apps you have open. Thus the  seperate app killer apps. Through experience on these other devices i can difinitely say being able to kill apps prolongs battery life.

    Tuesday, November 1, 2011 7:12 PM