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Fullscreen 'apps' on the desktop

    General discussion

  • These are honest questions.  I'm not trying to feed trolls here or trying to start pointless discussions.  I'ld love some offical answers from a msft employee.

    What is the point of having fullscreen metro applications on a +19" monitor, regardless of it having touch or not?

    How does this add to my productivity?

    Why is it better then what we have always had all the way upto to windows 7?

    Coming at this from a developer's viewpoint...

    On what basis do you, at microsoft, expect me to decide wheter I will write a metro versus a desktop application?

    I ask, because I am at a complete loss here.  Looking at the work I do today... of all 53 projects that are "live" today, there is only ONE I would consider porting to metro (a data consumption application to query a datawarehouse in a visual manner).  And the only reason I would do that is to make it cooler to use on a tablet.  I do not see how this application would serve my customers better by being fullscreen on their +19" monitors.  In fact, I would even consider it a bad idea.

    None of the new projects I'm doing now seems fit for metro.

    Could someone from microsoft try and clarify?


    Monday, September 26, 2011 2:09 PM

All replies

  • As I'm an IT student obviously I'm not related to MSFT. But let me give it a try.

    Metro UI is a unified smooth user experience. It's not meant to take over the UI-heavy applications (such as photoshop). It is meant for smaller applications that the day-to-day user might need. Think of applications targetting the elderly, or the cough-hanging people that just want to lay back and do some games. It's not meant to be used in a bussiness environment and Microsoft knows that.

    The decision between Metro and Desktop application has to be made concidering how you want the user to experience your program. I can also see more of the domotica research fitting into metro UI.

    Basically think of it like this: if you want your application to be used on a Windows Phone or Tablet, make it Metro, otherwise, make t desktop. (obviously you won't make bussiness aplications for a tablet). //Exceptions mark the rule ;)

    "Resources: Microsoft Keynotes & Blogs."

    Regards,

    Dylan Meeus


    0x2B |~ 0x2B Blog : www.it-ca.net/blogdylan
    Monday, September 26, 2011 2:32 PM
  • >> It's not meant to be used in a bussiness environment and Microsoft knows that.

    They have a very funny way of showing it.  In fact, they aren't.  At all.  In fact, they are pushing everybody to start crapping metro applications instead of desktop applications.

    Having said that...  To use Sinofsky's own words: This is windows.

    It is meant to be used by everybody.  Not just the people that want to play angry birds.  The power of windows is in the enterprise, not in the home.  It's enterprise that made microsoft big, not angry birds (using 'angry birds' as a symbol here obviously).

    >>The decision between Metro and Desktop application has to be made concidering how you want the user to experience your program

    This is exactly the problem.  It seems quite obvious that the only context where a metro application is the way to go is when you target a tablet.  For every other thing, metro simply seems unfit.

    >> I can also see more of the domotica research fitting into metro UI

    Because those things generally do well on a tablet.

    >>if you want your application to be used on a Windows Phone or Tablet

    I'm glad that you say this yourself.  However, you are just highlighting the concern.  If metro is to be used when you wish to target a tablet or phone, then what is it doing on my desktop?

    >>obviously you won't make bussiness aplications for a tablet

    Disagree.  Obviously, I will.  Enterprise has been waiting for 8 years now for a tablet suitable for their needs.  Windows 8 will, beyond a doubt, deliver that tablet.  Enterprise customers of our applications who buy a win8 tablet are going to want to have that datawarehouse application I mentioned in metro style.  And I can easily give you a list of dozens of enterprise applications you would want to have on your enterprise-fit tablet.

    But clearly, microsoft is forcing the metro stuff on all machines by crippling the desktop.  It is forcing any user of windows 8 to deal with metro things regardless of them being desktop heavy or not.

     

     

    Monday, September 26, 2011 3:01 PM
  • I think most companies will prefere to stay away from tablets, because it reduces the productivity of their employees.
    However that's just my opinion.

    Regards,

    Dylan Meeus


    0x2B |~ 0x2B Blog : www.it-ca.net/blogdylan
    Monday, September 26, 2011 3:10 PM
  • No, they really won't.

    Don't think of enterprise as a bunch of people sitting at a desk all day.  Those are only the "work force".

    Managers mostly don't even have desktops, they have laptops (they are a lot more mobile).

    Even for the work force, there is a very real place for tablets when you consider meetings.

    Here is where windows 8 (as an all-in-one system) can really shine: work at your desk with your tablet docked and in "desktop mode", then undock the tablet and take it with you as a tablet to the meeting, customer, supplier, whatever.

     

    I can see how that would work.  What I can't see is why these worlds are actively mixed together all the time.  It makes no sense. Windows should adapt in relation to the context in which it is used. 

    If I am in "desktop mode", I don't want to see "tablet mode" (unless I explicitly ask for it).  But clearly, Microsoft thinks I should be seeing "tablet mode" anyway.

    The entire purpose of this thread is to find out why.


    Monday, September 26, 2011 3:45 PM
  • I guess I was a bit closed-minded. I can see how managers might take advantage of tablets now. Thanks or the enlightment as we could call it ;)
    0x2B |~ 0x2B Blog : www.it-ca.net/blogdylan
    Monday, September 26, 2011 4:07 PM