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Biometric Images taken from inbuilt finger swipe on laptop (using WBF) with the onther biometric image captured by USB connected device RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi,

      I  have  used  Windows  Biometric Framework (WBF) to capture my finger print swiped on laptop, saved it as Test1.tif  image.

    Second the connected  USB  - biometric  device  by other vendor (Digital Persona), saved as Tes2.tif  image.

    Now  can we  compare  these  two  biometric  images  for verifying each to get user identity.  Does  windows  provide  the verification of  biometric  fingerprint between two different devices ?   Laptop (chip based  finger swipe) and USB connected (Optical image).

    My  working system:-  Windows 7.

    Any  help in this  direction  is  appreciated.

    Thanks-

    Chandan

    Monday, December 22, 2014 12:35 PM

Answers

  • Hi Chandan,

    I'm afraid that biometric identification is not as simple as comparing the raw images captured from a pair of fingerprint readers.

    Fingerprint matching is a probabilistic (i.e., "fuzzy") operation rather than a simple comparison. It typically consists of two steps:

    • Enrollment: the system collects multiple raw samples from a single finger. It extracts various features and patterns from these samples to build up an idealized model of the user's finger. This idealized, abstract model of the finger is called a "template." The system then stores this template for later use in verification.
    • Verification: the system collects a single raw sample from the user. It then extracts the same set of features and patterns that were used to build the template, and it compares the results against the features in the stored template. If the features in the sample are a close enough match to the features in the stored template, the user is verified; if not, then the verification fails. (Note that the comparison is based on a threshold: is the raw sample "similar enough" to the stored template; it is not an exact matching operation. They're basically measuring the "distance in feature space" between the sample and the template.)

    Things have to work this way because fingerprint readers never generate exactly the same data twice for any given finger. Factors such as the way the user touches the sensor, the condition of the user's skin, the humidity in the air -- all these things cause the readings to vary slightly even for the same finger. (This is true of all biometrics by the way; measurements of the human body are never exactly repeatable, so the matching operation will always involve some kind of threshold-based comparison.)

    In addition, the raw data from different types of fingerprint readers (e.g., optical vs. capacitive, or touch vs. swipe) is usually very different. For example, touch sensors return a single "image" of the fingerprint, while swipe sensors return a series of partially-overlapping strips that must be cleaned up and stitched together in software. So a direct comparison of data from two different types of sensor usually won't work.

    The Windows Biometric Framework (available starting in Windows 7) allows manufacturers to provide trusted plugins that perform biometric data capture, template construction and matching, and template storage operations. By providing these plugins, vendors are able to participate in various security operations (login/unlock, UAC elevation, app store purchases in Windows 8, etc.) without having to write any additional software.

    So your best bet is to check with the vendors who supplied your fingerprint sensors and see if they have installation packages available for the Windows Biometric Framework.

    Regards
    -Art Baker



    Tuesday, December 23, 2014 4:17 PM

All replies

  • Hi CJha,

    I'm afraid that it is not the correct forum about this issue, since this forum is to discuss WPF.

    I've moved your question to Windows Hardware WDK and Driver Development forum for better response.

    Thanks for your understanding.

    Best regards,
    Franklin


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    Tuesday, December 23, 2014 2:22 AM
  • Hi Chandan,

    I'm afraid that biometric identification is not as simple as comparing the raw images captured from a pair of fingerprint readers.

    Fingerprint matching is a probabilistic (i.e., "fuzzy") operation rather than a simple comparison. It typically consists of two steps:

    • Enrollment: the system collects multiple raw samples from a single finger. It extracts various features and patterns from these samples to build up an idealized model of the user's finger. This idealized, abstract model of the finger is called a "template." The system then stores this template for later use in verification.
    • Verification: the system collects a single raw sample from the user. It then extracts the same set of features and patterns that were used to build the template, and it compares the results against the features in the stored template. If the features in the sample are a close enough match to the features in the stored template, the user is verified; if not, then the verification fails. (Note that the comparison is based on a threshold: is the raw sample "similar enough" to the stored template; it is not an exact matching operation. They're basically measuring the "distance in feature space" between the sample and the template.)

    Things have to work this way because fingerprint readers never generate exactly the same data twice for any given finger. Factors such as the way the user touches the sensor, the condition of the user's skin, the humidity in the air -- all these things cause the readings to vary slightly even for the same finger. (This is true of all biometrics by the way; measurements of the human body are never exactly repeatable, so the matching operation will always involve some kind of threshold-based comparison.)

    In addition, the raw data from different types of fingerprint readers (e.g., optical vs. capacitive, or touch vs. swipe) is usually very different. For example, touch sensors return a single "image" of the fingerprint, while swipe sensors return a series of partially-overlapping strips that must be cleaned up and stitched together in software. So a direct comparison of data from two different types of sensor usually won't work.

    The Windows Biometric Framework (available starting in Windows 7) allows manufacturers to provide trusted plugins that perform biometric data capture, template construction and matching, and template storage operations. By providing these plugins, vendors are able to participate in various security operations (login/unlock, UAC elevation, app store purchases in Windows 8, etc.) without having to write any additional software.

    So your best bet is to check with the vendors who supplied your fingerprint sensors and see if they have installation packages available for the Windows Biometric Framework.

    Regards
    -Art Baker



    Tuesday, December 23, 2014 4:17 PM
  • Thanks  Art Baker.

    I  checked  my laptop  which is  HP EliteBook  having  Validity Sensor  for  Biometric  Devices.

    Same time  I  checked  my friend's laptop  which  is  Dell  Latitude E7440  where it is  Broadcom Corp  manufactured Control Vault w/ Fingerprint Swipe Sensor.

    Both  is  using WBF then  if  I  run my test  application on  Dell it  fails after opening the session

    WinBioCaptureSample failed. hr = 0X80004001    i.e.  WINBIO_E_UNSUPPORTED_FACTOR   0x80098001

    It means the Control  Vault has not  implemented the interface. If  both vendors are  using WBF  then ideally my test  application should run  on both at least otherwise  WBF is dependent on biometric chipset manufacturers not the Microsoft WBF guidelines.

    Your  suggestions  welcome.

    Monday, December 29, 2014 10:19 AM