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C# coding standard….. RRS feed

  • Question

  • Anyone suggest me a coding standard for C# language. What is the latest conclusion in the industry.

     

    Thank you,

     

    Smith

     


    Smith
    Monday, October 26, 2009 6:40 PM

Answers

  • That's a pretty broad question.  The are numerous types of coding standards, each with a specific focus in mind.

     FxCop

    That is a tool that can analyze your code to see if it conforms to coding practices recommended for use with the Framework.

    Design Guidelines

    More Design Guidelines

    Mark the best replies as answers. "Fooling computers since 1971."
    • Proposed as answer by Michael Koster Monday, October 26, 2009 7:49 PM
    • Marked as answer by Bin-ze Zhao Thursday, October 29, 2009 11:01 AM
    Monday, October 26, 2009 6:50 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • That's a pretty broad question.  The are numerous types of coding standards, each with a specific focus in mind.

     FxCop

    That is a tool that can analyze your code to see if it conforms to coding practices recommended for use with the Framework.

    Design Guidelines

    More Design Guidelines

    Mark the best replies as answers. "Fooling computers since 1971."
    • Proposed as answer by Michael Koster Monday, October 26, 2009 7:49 PM
    • Marked as answer by Bin-ze Zhao Thursday, October 29, 2009 11:01 AM
    Monday, October 26, 2009 6:50 PM
    Moderator
  • And in the area of design patterns, the most common I see is Business Layer/Data Layer with MVC coming in a far second, but as Rude said it depends on organizational needs.

    Working for small companies, often times I end up having to make design pattern decisions.  The best thing to do in that scenerio is familiarize yourself with the basics of what they do and pick the one that closely matches the project needs.

    Good coding involves knowing one's logical limits and expanding them as necessary.
    Monday, October 26, 2009 7:06 PM
  • More important than coding standards are system design standards. There are hundreds of relevant books written in the past half a century. A good system analyst understands things such as requirements definitions and life cycle methodologies. The most difficult task is convincing management of the value of taking the time to do things like that.
    Sam Hobbs; see my SimpleSamples.Info
    Monday, October 26, 2009 11:44 PM