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bing.com thinks my azure VM is in Brazil

    Question

  • I created a azure windows server 2012 in EastUS region. When I open bing.com(tried both IE 10 and chrome), it redirect me to the br.bing.com. I checked the system locale, it is set to United States. What's wrong with it and how can I change it back to normal?

    I asked think in SO(http://stackoverflow.com/questions/20649869/azure-virtual-machine-sets-wrong-locale), but think maybe more relevant here.

    User astaykov commented this is probably "caused by incorrect geoIP database", which I don't have any idea about it.

    Thanks!

    Wednesday, December 18, 2013 3:47 PM

Answers

  • It appears that Microsoft recently acquired a large number of IP addresses from LACNIC the regional registry that handles the Latin America area. According to their datacenter IP list (http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=41653) they made these new addresses available to be used in most locations. In an odd twist the only addresses ranges in the Brazil region happened to be from ARIN (North American regional registry) (https://www.iana.org/assignments/ipv4-address-space/ipv4-address-space.xml).

    It is an annoyance but there isn't much they can probably do. Most of the regional registries are running out of IPv4 address space they probably need them. They aren't routing them through incorrect regions or anything so not to worry your VM's are in the correct places.

    Now some companies that purposely use GEO IP databases to limit or restrict traffic (not really a good idea honestly) might have issues if for some reason they block traffic to IP ranges that IT administrators don't 'approve of.' 

    Realistically this is just a side effect of slow IPv6 adoption. Chances are Microsoft isn't going to be the only ones having to do this in the coming years.
    Sunday, April 27, 2014 11:53 PM
  • Hi,

    Thanks for your posting.

    In general, if you shutdown a virtual machine, the IP addresses (both public VIP and internal IP) will stay with your cloud service or virtual machine.

    An internal IP address is an IP address that is assigned to each virtual machine by DHCP. It is not public facing. If you have created a virtual network, the internal IP address is assigned from the range that you specify. If you do not have a virtual network, an internal IP address will still be assigned. The internal IP address will remain with the virtual machine for its lifetime, unless that virtual machine is stop/deallocated.

    Regards.


    Vivian Wang

    Monday, December 23, 2013 6:27 AM

All replies

  • Hi,

    Thanks for your posting.

    What about other websites?

    Did you check the virtual machine vip address on the Windows Azure Management Portal?

    Windows Azure is divided physically and logically into units called regions. A region consists of one or more datacenters in close proximity.  At the time of this writing, Windows Azure has eight regions (4 in North America, 2 in Asia, and 2 in Europe).

    Under rare circumstances facilities in an entire region can become inaccessible, for example due to network failures, or lost entirely for example due to natural disasters. This section explains Azure’s capabilities for creating applications which are distributed across regions. Regions are designed to minimize the possibility that a failure in one region could affect other regions.

    Regards.


    Vivian Wang

    Thursday, December 19, 2013 6:33 AM
  • Thanks for replying. Google.com works fine. I understand the regions. The VM I created is in EastUS, I don't understand why it was assigned an IP that was in Brazil.

    I deleted the VM and created a new one, it works ok. 

    Now the question is, when the VM is shutdown and restarted, it will have new IP address. Will the IP address in regions other than US? How can I prevent that?

    Thursday, December 19, 2013 5:23 PM
  • Hi,

    Thanks for your posting.

    In general, if you shutdown a virtual machine, the IP addresses (both public VIP and internal IP) will stay with your cloud service or virtual machine.

    An internal IP address is an IP address that is assigned to each virtual machine by DHCP. It is not public facing. If you have created a virtual network, the internal IP address is assigned from the range that you specify. If you do not have a virtual network, an internal IP address will still be assigned. The internal IP address will remain with the virtual machine for its lifetime, unless that virtual machine is stop/deallocated.

    Regards.


    Vivian Wang

    Monday, December 23, 2013 6:27 AM
  • This just happened to me as well, I created a Windows 2012 R2 VM and set the Location to Eastern US, but when the VM was created, it was assigned a public IP from Brazil.  I've done google searches and cannot find any information about this issue, and cannot find any Azure detailed documentation regarding the Location setting.  Does Azure consider the setting just a "guideline" and may still assign an IP from any region it wishes?
    Saturday, March 29, 2014 2:32 PM
  • I have the same problem. I created a VM in the East US data center. Whenever I access internet sites from the VM, it thinks that I'm surfing from Brazil.

    1) this is annoying

    2) I'm concerned that my VM's data is getting replicated to South America for no reason and that I'd be paying unnecessary bandwidth costs

    Any ideas?

    Thanks,
    -Ben 


    Benjamin Day - Microsoft MVP for Visual Studio ALM - http://www.benday.com/blog

    Monday, April 07, 2014 8:22 PM
  • I am seeing this too. Not only are my search results in Spanish/Portuguese but every time I login to my Windows Account I get suspicious activity alerts.

    It is both annoying and a PITA. I have never had this problem with any of my VM's on AWS.

    Is this potentially causing site performance on the server with roundtrips to Brazil?

    I really don't want to create a new VM as I have put a lot of time into setting it up. Any other way to resolve this?

    Update: It gets worse, when I use Google search it thinks I am in Taiwan. 
    • Edited by mhammo Sunday, April 27, 2014 1:57 PM
    Sunday, April 27, 2014 1:47 PM
  • It appears that Microsoft recently acquired a large number of IP addresses from LACNIC the regional registry that handles the Latin America area. According to their datacenter IP list (http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=41653) they made these new addresses available to be used in most locations. In an odd twist the only addresses ranges in the Brazil region happened to be from ARIN (North American regional registry) (https://www.iana.org/assignments/ipv4-address-space/ipv4-address-space.xml).

    It is an annoyance but there isn't much they can probably do. Most of the regional registries are running out of IPv4 address space they probably need them. They aren't routing them through incorrect regions or anything so not to worry your VM's are in the correct places.

    Now some companies that purposely use GEO IP databases to limit or restrict traffic (not really a good idea honestly) might have issues if for some reason they block traffic to IP ranges that IT administrators don't 'approve of.' 

    Realistically this is just a side effect of slow IPv6 adoption. Chances are Microsoft isn't going to be the only ones having to do this in the coming years.
    Sunday, April 27, 2014 11:53 PM
  • It appears that Microsoft recently acquired a large number of IP addresses from LACNIC the regional registry that handles the Latin America area. According to their datacenter IP list (http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=41653) they made these new addresses available to be used in most locations. In an odd twist the only addresses ranges in the Brazil region happened to be from ARIN (North American regional registry) (https://www.iana.org/assignments/ipv4-address-space/ipv4-address-space.xml).

    It is an annoyance but there isn't much they can probably do. Most of the regional registries are running out of IPv4 address space they probably need them. They aren't routing them through incorrect regions or anything so not to worry your VM's are in the correct places.

    Now some companies that purposely use GEO IP databases to limit or restrict traffic (not really a good idea honestly) might have issues if for some reason they block traffic to IP ranges that IT administrators don't 'approve of.' 

    Realistically this is just a side effect of slow IPv6 adoption. Chances are Microsoft isn't going to be the only ones having to do this in the coming years.

    Thanks Kevin. This explanation makes most sense. 

    I am surprised that this is marked as answered but actual didn't answer the question.


    Monday, April 28, 2014 2:16 AM
  • Hi,

    Thanks for your posting.

    In general, if you shutdown a virtual machine, the IP addresses (both public VIP and internal IP) will stay with your cloud service or virtual machine.

    An internal IP address is an IP address that is assigned to each virtual machine by DHCP. It is not public facing. If you have created a virtual network, the internal IP address is assigned from the range that you specify. If you do not have a virtual network, an internal IP address will still be assigned. The internal IP address will remain with the virtual machine for its lifetime, unless that virtual machine is stop/deallocated.

    Regards.


    Vivian Wang

    I am using the VM about 2 hours a day and then shut it down. Seems it is getting new public address every time. Not sure if this makes sense?? Can we at least reserve the IP address for x days? (recycle it if the VM assigned the IP has not been started for x days).

    Is this something I can setup myself to prevent this ip gets recycled?

    Thanks.

    Monday, April 28, 2014 2:19 AM
  • Thank you, although not a solution it's at least the first explanation that fits.  I had asked about this issue in a different thread and none of the MS staff seemed to even understand the question:

    http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/windowsazure/en-US/26a0dc45-23c5-49fe-a9ef-bb1f50cd8fde/vm-public-ip-is-in-wrongincorrect-region?forum=WAVirtualMachinesforWindows

    GEO IP databases are used in many scenarios and having this mismatch can cause issues, so I guess the only workaround at the moment is to delete the VM and keep trying until you get an IP in the correct Geo IP database region.

    Monday, April 28, 2014 2:41 AM
  • Same here as of last night.

    This is ridiculous Microsoft!

    No one (zero people) want any of their US East Region VMs to have a public facing IP that is for/from Brazil. Standing by as this is screwing up a lot of things for us and many others based on scanning this thread.


    Bill Thacker

    • Proposed as answer by MarkH-NC Thursday, June 19, 2014 2:28 PM
    Saturday, May 10, 2014 3:25 PM
  • Thank you, although not a solution it's at least the first explanation that fits.  I had asked about this issue in a different thread and none of the MS staff seemed to even understand the question:

    http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/windowsazure/en-US/26a0dc45-23c5-49fe-a9ef-bb1f50cd8fde/vm-public-ip-is-in-wrongincorrect-region?forum=WAVirtualMachinesforWindows

    GEO IP databases are used in many scenarios and having this mismatch can cause issues, so I guess the only workaround at the moment is to delete the VM and keep trying until you get an IP in the correct Geo IP database region.

    good luck with that. And in case you shut it down(deallocated), you have the chance of getting an IP in another region again (my own experience).
    Saturday, May 10, 2014 7:15 PM
  • Today it happened to my another VM, it is centos. After reboot, I tried to do "yum update" but failed to connected to the repo.

    After lots of puzzle why this happened, I found that my Ip address is now in Brazil.... That might be the reason that yum update failed...

    I have no idea why MSFT did this????

    Sunday, May 18, 2014 12:35 AM
  • This is INSANE.

    I setup this VM as East US.

    Yet, here's what my assigned IP shows as:

    City: Sao Paulo
    State/Region: Sao Paulo
    Country: BR - br flag
    ISP: Microsoft Informatica Ltda

     

    BAD!

    Thursday, June 19, 2014 2:30 PM
  • MSFT, any response or workaround on this?
    Friday, June 20, 2014 3:06 AM