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Nervous about installing Visual Studio 2012 on my existing setup...please help RRS feed

  • Question

  • User-1851576699 posted

    I have recently become interested in updating my development system to Visual Studio 2012, even more so since learning that it does not require Windows 8(*puke*, excuse me) to be installed for use. Currently, I am running Visual Studio 2010 SP1 and SQL Server 2008 R2 on top of Windows 7 Ultimate SP1. Other than ASP.Net development server(webdev.exe) crashing on a pretty consistent basis, everything seems pretty smooth.

    But I have these questions I would like to ask for anyone who can answer for me.

    1. Does the installation of Visual Studio 2012 get installed alongside Visual Studio 2010 or will it replace my existing installation?

    2. Can I use both products if I want to? Until I am fully adjusted to VS 2012?

    3. I began the installation of VS 2012 but the description of "Microsoft Web Developer Tools" scared me when it talked about installing IIS Express. I already have IIS 7.5 installed and running. Also, I am not sure whether to install/check "Microsoft SQL Server Data Tools" as it mentions installing "MIcrosoft SQL Server 2012". And I already have SQL Server 2008 R2 installed. 

    Where are all the sub options under these categories? Why the all or nothing approach with this install? What if I want a subset of the programs under the "Microsoft Web Developer Tools"? 

    It seems Microsoft's new approach to software design is, "Let us make all the decisions for you, your too stupid to do it."

    Tuesday, March 26, 2013 7:36 AM

Answers

  • User281315223 posted

    You shouldn't really worry too much.

    Visual Studio 2012 and 2010 work along side each other just fine and I have been using both of them for quite some time without any issues or conflicts regarding IIS (or basically any other areas). You can continue using 2010 until you become acclimated and decide to make the switch to 2012 after playing with it for a while.

    You can still use SQL Server 2008 R2 along with Visual Studio 2012 just fine, so you shouldn't feel obligated to install the newer version of SQL. One of the reasons that Visual Studio 2010 suggests installing SQL Server 2012 (likely an express edition) is to use some of the database-related features within Visual Studio (which should still work just fine using 2008 R2)

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Tuesday, March 26, 2013 7:44 AM
  • User71929859 posted

    Hello,

    It turns out most of it was built for Windows 8.

    Not really. Can you list what are the those features you are talking about which will only work in Win 8?

    To anybody avoiding Windows 8 like the plague, as I am, do you feel the upgrade to Visual Studio 2012 and ASP.Net 4.5 was worth whatever gains there are if one is not developing for Windows 8?

    Here at work, I'm using VS2012 on Windows 7. And at home, I'm using VS2012 in Windows 8. I really don't see any big differences when it comes to ASP.NET.

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Wednesday, March 27, 2013 5:13 AM
  • User281315223 posted

    Another thing to consider is that this address was given at the BUILD conference, which was prior to the release of Windows 8. I'm sure a major point that was being presented with it was to demonstrate how easily users that were familar with the .NET environment could transition to making Windows 8 applications.

    (It probably didn't hurt to help "hype" Windows 8 and get people at the conference more excited)

    Although the focus of that video, which is nearly two years old now, was targeting Windows 8 development specifically, Microsoft has made improvements across the board (as mentioned in my previous link) to making development for any kind of applications much easier and user friendly with Visual Studio 2012 and .NET 4.5 .

    I'm sure you won't be disappointed with Visual Studio 2012. Most people were hesitant from the look and feel of it (as they were with Windows 8 as well) but once you start working with it, you might find that it'll grow on you and might make your life a bit easier.

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Wednesday, March 27, 2013 8:23 AM
  • User1908258526 posted

    However, the "white on rice" theme is a little weird.

    Not sure if this applies to your version of VS (iirc Express versions can't use extentions) but otherwise you might want to pick up the VS2012 Color theme editor which Microsoft quickly slapped together. The 'Blue theme' fortunately brings back some of the look and feel of VS2010. Meant real serious here: if it wasn't for this module I wouldn't have purchased VS2012, because the default theme gives me a headache after a while, I really dislike that what I consider to be idiocy.

    I went from VS2010 Express (several versions) to VS2012 Professional and like you avoid Win8 best as I can. Heck; even trying to stimulate our customers to upgrade from XP to Win7 now that it's still available ;-)

    And yes, I think it was worth every bit of it. Keeping ontopic here; there are many aspects which ASP.NET 4.5 provides which the previous version didn't have. For example, I enjoy the option to have routing capabilities in my Web forms applications (maybe its because I'm new, but I'm not very happy with MVC). I'm also very keen with tight TFS integration, though I can't comment on that in comparison to VS2010 (didn't use it back then).

    Still..  I do hope they'll release update 2 very soon because not having Blend available is kind of a setback for me. But that might be a little beyond the scope here (Silverlight, WPF, and such).

    But in the overall I'm very happy with my upgrade.

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Thursday, March 28, 2013 9:24 AM
  • User281315223 posted

    Blend should be one of the options within the Visual Studio 2012 Installation (there should have been a checkbox offering you to install it). You may just not have selected the box during installation (if it was available).

    You can check for it by taking the following steps : 

    1. Go to your Control Panel.
    2. Select the Programs and Features Option.
    3. Find your Microsoft Visual Studio 2012 Instance.
    4. Right Click on it and Select the "Change" option.
    5. Find the option to select "Blend" and ensure it is checked.

    For future reference, TFS stands for Team Foundation Server / Services, which is Microsoft's Team Development Platform, which features an IDE, Source and Version Control along with a bevy of other features designed for managing teams during the development proess. :)

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Thursday, March 28, 2013 11:11 AM

All replies

  • User281315223 posted

    You shouldn't really worry too much.

    Visual Studio 2012 and 2010 work along side each other just fine and I have been using both of them for quite some time without any issues or conflicts regarding IIS (or basically any other areas). You can continue using 2010 until you become acclimated and decide to make the switch to 2012 after playing with it for a while.

    You can still use SQL Server 2008 R2 along with Visual Studio 2012 just fine, so you shouldn't feel obligated to install the newer version of SQL. One of the reasons that Visual Studio 2010 suggests installing SQL Server 2012 (likely an express edition) is to use some of the database-related features within Visual Studio (which should still work just fine using 2008 R2)

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Tuesday, March 26, 2013 7:44 AM
  • User-1851576699 posted

    Allright then. Sounds like it should go pretty smoothly. I guess I am gonna go ahead and do this. Thanks for the information. :)

    Tuesday, March 26, 2013 7:53 AM
  • User281315223 posted

    No problem.

    Let us know if you encounter any issues along the way :)

    Tuesday, March 26, 2013 8:00 AM
  • User-1851576699 posted

    Well, I got the Visual Studio 2012 installed. There were no problems with that. Much of it looks the same in terms of functionality at first glance. However, the "white on rice" theme is a little weird. Oh, and after the installation I went and downloaded a 43 minute video explaining what ASP.Net 4.5 was all about. It turns out most of it was built for Windows 8. That made me wanna cry. I wish I had asked that specific question before installing it.

    To anybody avoiding Windows 8 like the plague, as I am, do you feel the upgrade to Visual Studio 2012 and ASP.Net 4.5 was worth whatever gains there are if one is not developing for Windows 8? I still have yet to explore it very much. I am hoping the upgrade wasn't completely for nothing.

    Tuesday, March 26, 2013 7:48 PM
  • User71929859 posted

    Hello,

    It turns out most of it was built for Windows 8.

    Not really. Can you list what are the those features you are talking about which will only work in Win 8?

    To anybody avoiding Windows 8 like the plague, as I am, do you feel the upgrade to Visual Studio 2012 and ASP.Net 4.5 was worth whatever gains there are if one is not developing for Windows 8?

    Here at work, I'm using VS2012 on Windows 7. And at home, I'm using VS2012 in Windows 8. I really don't see any big differences when it comes to ASP.NET.

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Wednesday, March 27, 2013 5:13 AM
  • User281315223 posted

    You shouldn't really be worried about Windows 8 "taking over" everything.

    Much of Microsoft's design and UI has certainly shifted towards a more Windows 8 look (previously Metro) but at the end of the day Visual Studio 2012 and .NET 4.5 are the latest and greatest development tools available from Microsoft. They do allow you to develop applications for the Windows 8 store, but they still allow you to develop great applications outside of it as well.

    I would highly recommend checking out the following link, which details all of the improvements and changes that were made within Visual Studio 2012 and .NET 4.5, you'll likely notice that very few of the items specfically target Windows 8 applications at all : 

    Wednesday, March 27, 2013 7:51 AM
  • User-1851576699 posted

    I certainly like you what are saying but the key speaker in the video I downloaded from this very website said that most of what they did was for Windows 8. He says that near the vey beginning of the videol

    http://channel9.msdn.com/events/BUILD/BUILD2011/TOOL-834T

    I watched it from beginning to end. I don't mind giving it a chance though. I'll keep my fingers crossed. :)

    Edit: Okay, Im gonna start slapping this Visual Studio 2012 around like a little red-headed stepchild. Two things within a very short period of time using it that I have discovered are very annoying. 

    Matching braces, brackets, and curly braces with ctrl-]. If you match from the bottom character to the top it only goes up in the document far enough to show you the first matching character of the pair. Then I have to scroll up even further to see what it matched. Microsoft's own formatting style puts opening and closing function curly braces on their very own line so you'll never be able to immediately see the name of the function that matched. This is very annoying. How about centering the matching curly brace in the center of the screen? That needs to be fixed up.

    Also, when adding controls in design view, they have changed the flow of manually adding attribute values on the control. Something is different that is throwing my brain out of sync with my typing. I'll have to go back into Visual Studio 2010 to figure out what's different.

    Wednesday, March 27, 2013 8:11 AM
  • User281315223 posted

    Another thing to consider is that this address was given at the BUILD conference, which was prior to the release of Windows 8. I'm sure a major point that was being presented with it was to demonstrate how easily users that were familar with the .NET environment could transition to making Windows 8 applications.

    (It probably didn't hurt to help "hype" Windows 8 and get people at the conference more excited)

    Although the focus of that video, which is nearly two years old now, was targeting Windows 8 development specifically, Microsoft has made improvements across the board (as mentioned in my previous link) to making development for any kind of applications much easier and user friendly with Visual Studio 2012 and .NET 4.5 .

    I'm sure you won't be disappointed with Visual Studio 2012. Most people were hesitant from the look and feel of it (as they were with Windows 8 as well) but once you start working with it, you might find that it'll grow on you and might make your life a bit easier.

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Wednesday, March 27, 2013 8:23 AM
  • User1908258526 posted

    However, the "white on rice" theme is a little weird.

    Not sure if this applies to your version of VS (iirc Express versions can't use extentions) but otherwise you might want to pick up the VS2012 Color theme editor which Microsoft quickly slapped together. The 'Blue theme' fortunately brings back some of the look and feel of VS2010. Meant real serious here: if it wasn't for this module I wouldn't have purchased VS2012, because the default theme gives me a headache after a while, I really dislike that what I consider to be idiocy.

    I went from VS2010 Express (several versions) to VS2012 Professional and like you avoid Win8 best as I can. Heck; even trying to stimulate our customers to upgrade from XP to Win7 now that it's still available ;-)

    And yes, I think it was worth every bit of it. Keeping ontopic here; there are many aspects which ASP.NET 4.5 provides which the previous version didn't have. For example, I enjoy the option to have routing capabilities in my Web forms applications (maybe its because I'm new, but I'm not very happy with MVC). I'm also very keen with tight TFS integration, though I can't comment on that in comparison to VS2010 (didn't use it back then).

    Still..  I do hope they'll release update 2 very soon because not having Blend available is kind of a setback for me. But that might be a little beyond the scope here (Silverlight, WPF, and such).

    But in the overall I'm very happy with my upgrade.

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Thursday, March 28, 2013 9:24 AM
  • User-1851576699 posted

    I don't know much about "Blend" in regards to what it is or what it does but I do believe it is included in Visual Studio 2012. Yes, as I look at my "Start Menu"(thats right, I still got one, :)) it shows a shortcut to "Blend for Visual Studio 2012".

    I installed the Visual Studio 2012 Professional version and it offered to install it for me, so I said, "uuuuhhhhh.....yeah....sure....what the hell" even though I have no clue what it is. :)

    I know what MVC stands for but have no experience with it either. I have no idea what TFS stands for.

    But to summarize, Blend came with my installation. Not sure why it wasn't in yours.

    Thursday, March 28, 2013 10:55 AM
  • User281315223 posted

    Blend should be one of the options within the Visual Studio 2012 Installation (there should have been a checkbox offering you to install it). You may just not have selected the box during installation (if it was available).

    You can check for it by taking the following steps : 

    1. Go to your Control Panel.
    2. Select the Programs and Features Option.
    3. Find your Microsoft Visual Studio 2012 Instance.
    4. Right Click on it and Select the "Change" option.
    5. Find the option to select "Blend" and ensure it is checked.

    For future reference, TFS stands for Team Foundation Server / Services, which is Microsoft's Team Development Platform, which features an IDE, Source and Version Control along with a bevy of other features designed for managing teams during the development proess. :)

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Thursday, March 28, 2013 11:11 AM