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Mixed Mode = No Windows User Accounts?? RRS feed

  • Question

  • I am reading the official Microsoft MCTS Exam 70-431 book, page 74. There is a section on Mixed Mode authentication. It says:

    "With Mixed Mode Authentication, both Windows logins and SQL Server logins (neither of which are mapped to an operating system user) can access the SQL Server instance."

    Really? That part in (parentheses) -- is that right?? That is word-for-word from the book.

    Here's what I do to test:  My SQL 2005 instance is set for Mixed Mode. In SQL 2005 SSMS, drill down Security -> Logins.  Right-click, New Login, verify that Windows authentication is selected, type in a login name that is NOT a Windows User ("an operating system user"), click OK and you get an error. That seems right. The book seems wrong! If you have SQL Login who is a Windows Login, that Windows Login is by definition mapped to "an operating system user" -- right?

    Am I missing something??

    You can read it here -- you have to go to page 112, last pargraph on the page...

    http://www.docstoc.com/docs/10156828/unprotected-Microsoft-Press-MCTS-70-431-SQL-Server-2005-Implementation-and-Maintenance

    And here is the errata for the book:

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/920926

    Thanks for the help!

    Tuesday, October 27, 2009 4:17 PM

Answers

  • Hi jp

    The book is wrong. A Windows login is by definition an OS user. BOL link

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms144284.aspx

    HTH

    Ewan

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    • Marked as answer by jpSQLDude Tuesday, October 27, 2009 5:48 PM
    Tuesday, October 27, 2009 4:59 PM

All replies

  • Hi jp

    The book is wrong. A Windows login is by definition an OS user. BOL link

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms144284.aspx

    HTH

    Ewan

    If you have found this post helpful, please click the 'Vote as Helpful' link (the green triangle and number on the top-left).

    If this post answers your question, click the 'Mark As Answered' link below. It helps others who experience the same issue in future to find the solution.
    • Marked as answer by jpSQLDude Tuesday, October 27, 2009 5:48 PM
    Tuesday, October 27, 2009 4:59 PM
  • Thanx!

    Two questions, then:

    1. Is there a way to submit an issue to MS for their Errata?

    2. Will MS now supply me with a free book on Exam 70-433: SQL 2008 Development??

      :)
    Tuesday, October 27, 2009 5:12 PM
  • No Problem

    As for the follow-up

    1. MSPress have a number of links for feedback on content
    http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/training/format-books-support.aspx#tab3

    2. Good luck with that :)

    HTH

    Ewan


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    Tuesday, October 27, 2009 5:18 PM
  • Hi jp

    If your question has been answered, can you mark any helpful posts and any that have answered your question. It helps others searching for the same issue in the future to find the answer, and keeps the forums tidy.

    Thanks

    Ewan


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    Tuesday, October 27, 2009 5:39 PM
  • Cool, done, thanx!

    Can I ask you another question? Let me know if I should open this as a separate question...

    In Windows you have something called Users, right?

    Looking at my SQL 2005 SSMS, I see, at the Server level, under Security, something called Logins. So a SQL Login can be a Windows User, right?

    Then, under a database, under Security, I have Users.

    Hey!

    So a Windows User is a SQL Login, which is then mapped to a SQL User.

    Ugh! No wonder this gets confusing.

    Do I have that right?  Have you ever seen an handy-dandy chart or something that clearly and preceicely shows the relationships between Users, Logins, and Users?

    Thanks again!

    Tuesday, October 27, 2009 5:53 PM
  • Hi

    It's all pretty straightforward really.

    A Login is a server level object (server principal in SQL 2005/2008 terms). This login can either map to a Windows account, or be self-contained as a SQL account, with its own password.

    This login has no authority to do anything in any database.

    Within each database, a login can map to a User (database principal). This database user can be granted permission to SELECT, INSERT, CREATE etc.

    It might be easier to think of it as Windows account -> Server Principal (Login) -> Database Principal (user)

    HTH

    Ewan

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    Tuesday, October 27, 2009 9:27 PM