none
Why Companies are not prefered to use .NET? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi Friends,

    I am fan of .NET Technologies or Microsoft Products.

    But I have a question in my mind that why people do not want to use .net as their first priority why the prefer java and others when I discuss something about .net with my friend are java developers they always tells me that

     ".Net or Microsoft wants to provide everything from their self. They do not want to use others products and others also not supporting them (Like java & Apache & Android Phone development support from java and they have also J2ME). In .net framework .net provides so many languages then also .net is not successful. Take the example of java they provide only one language then also they are in top".

    So can anyone solve my friend’s doubts clearly? I do not want a .pdf file or a web link with too much lines of information for explanation.


    vikas
    Friday, March 11, 2011 5:19 PM

Answers

  • Hi,

    I will try to add something to this thread but all I can tell you is my personal view.

    "why people do not want to use .net as their first priority" - People prefer something. Some people prefer BMW when they talk about cars, others are prefering Mercedes. So what? Enough people outside prefer .Net. There might be reasons to use Java sometimes and sometimes there might be reasons to not use it. But I don't think that you want any discussion about this stuff. (Search on the net - there are enough comparisons and flame wars ...)

    "Why microsoft not providing /declaring  any Technology as Open Source?" - Why should they? What is important is, that there are standards! And Microsoft standardized the language. And there is NO NEED at all to have an open source implementation. BTW: Java has no official open source implementation and cannot have it. An open source project is not allowed to use the official java tests. (A reason why the Apache Foundation is so angry at Oracle and stoped some work. But who cares?)

    I could write some flamewar things regarding a java vs .Net topic, but I removed that again. This is simply off topic.

    What I can tell you is:

    - Just concentrate on one language. It does not matter, what you take: Java, C#, VB.Net, Smalltalk, ... Just make sure that you really learn it. Get the object thinking part! That is important. If you want to switch later, it is still possible. But then again: Really switch which means: LEARN IT PROPPERLY. Nothing is worse than a Java developer writing .Net code with no idea about the .net framework.)

    - The language itself does not matter. The way you work with stuff matters. The new development is "managed code" which means, that some part is now taken over by the software. Memory management is a big point of failure. All these buffer overflow attacks and such things. But you get thios advantage in all languages: Java has it, .Net has it. Objective-C got it. And all possibilities you need? You can do your Web Service compliant to standards easily in Java and .Net. This platform indipendence? Sorry who needs that? It is not that common. And you get all disadvantages like platform indipendence - Windows APIs are only available on Windows :)

    That was my 2 cent. Hopefully it was usefull.

    Konrad

    • Marked as answer by Paul Zhou Monday, March 21, 2011 2:15 AM
    Saturday, March 12, 2011 6:28 PM

All replies

  • So comparative speaking in terms of language population (and ignore the language difficulty), instead of using a somewhat universal translator that support multiple languages your friend want to force everyone to study Chinese instead?

    There is no on-size-fit-all solution. Language is not religion, you should choose language that fit most with your team within your time, budget and experience constraints when you start a project (by that I mean a code project, not a product which may be written in different languages because different requirements for each module).

     



    The following is signature, not part of post
    Please mark the post answered your question as the answer, and mark other helpful posts as helpful, so they will appear differently to other users who are visiting your thread for the same problem.
    Visual C++ MVP
    Friday, March 11, 2011 10:39 PM
  • hello sir,

    whatever you are saying is correct but think like

    a new student comming from a schooling -->he has to learn only one language for any type of development in Open Source & Out of Open Source (i.e. JAVA)

    this the fact after 10 or 20 year there should not be any programmer in Fortron an Python or any other old Languages to which .net provides support so everything is waste.

    Why microsoft not providing /declaring  any Technology as Open Source?

    Mono Project is not able to make  good success in open source(ie failed). why?

    As you told  "universal translator" donot forget that english is becoming dominent not Chinese, hindi,jappanes...so on.

    Lastly

     I want to tell you that "Learning one language is better that learning 100. Just think about future not past(whatever ms is providing they are providing by thinking about that they will attract the programmer. there is no doubt that programmer not like .net they like. but what about the customer/client?).

     


    vikas
    • Edited by VikasGupta Saturday, May 26, 2018 5:24 PM spelling
    Saturday, March 12, 2011 6:12 AM
  • >Why microsoft not providing /declaring any language as Open Source?

    Stop readying whatever you are reading and get some basic education about computer languages . Language are not software. They are coding conversions people agreed up on so code written for one compiler can be compiled in another compiler. There is no source code for a language. 

    I generally do not hire people who knows only language becausethey lack of the concept what is a platform, what is a class library and what is in a language and it is just better find someone who knows software analysis more to know language isn't a big factor in real world solutions, a programmer who knows a few languages would get familiar with a new language in a matter of days. 

    Chinese has around 20% market share, right about what Java is right now. And it has 5000 years of culture (most of the culture are in public domain, like open source class libraries in computer programming) and you can earn big bucks if your company want to enter the Chinese market (better than your make life easier argument). By your logic people should be forced to switch to Chinese now right? Sorry, life isn't that simple. 

    Anything you said about Java has been said for C/C++. Languages  like java are created for new real world solutions, and they soon become old because real world problems evolve at faster and faster rates, so you will see more and more languages. In 10 or 20 years java may not even be the language of choice, let alone be the only language standing. But old language would still survive, Google and Apple did not create C++ SDK for Andriod/iOS for no reason. People want to be flexible in language choice, and that's what Microsoft is doing in Visual Studio.



    The following is signature, not part of post
    Please mark the post answered your question as the answer, and mark other helpful posts as helpful, so they will appear differently to other users who are visiting your thread for the same problem.
    Visual C++ MVP
    Saturday, March 12, 2011 3:27 PM
  • Thanks sir.

    I respect whatever you wrote.

    i am a B.Tech student and currently i am doing my internship in a software company

    My intention/focus is not only on languages (that was wrong written by me).


    vikas
    Saturday, March 12, 2011 5:42 PM
  • Hi,

    I will try to add something to this thread but all I can tell you is my personal view.

    "why people do not want to use .net as their first priority" - People prefer something. Some people prefer BMW when they talk about cars, others are prefering Mercedes. So what? Enough people outside prefer .Net. There might be reasons to use Java sometimes and sometimes there might be reasons to not use it. But I don't think that you want any discussion about this stuff. (Search on the net - there are enough comparisons and flame wars ...)

    "Why microsoft not providing /declaring  any Technology as Open Source?" - Why should they? What is important is, that there are standards! And Microsoft standardized the language. And there is NO NEED at all to have an open source implementation. BTW: Java has no official open source implementation and cannot have it. An open source project is not allowed to use the official java tests. (A reason why the Apache Foundation is so angry at Oracle and stoped some work. But who cares?)

    I could write some flamewar things regarding a java vs .Net topic, but I removed that again. This is simply off topic.

    What I can tell you is:

    - Just concentrate on one language. It does not matter, what you take: Java, C#, VB.Net, Smalltalk, ... Just make sure that you really learn it. Get the object thinking part! That is important. If you want to switch later, it is still possible. But then again: Really switch which means: LEARN IT PROPPERLY. Nothing is worse than a Java developer writing .Net code with no idea about the .net framework.)

    - The language itself does not matter. The way you work with stuff matters. The new development is "managed code" which means, that some part is now taken over by the software. Memory management is a big point of failure. All these buffer overflow attacks and such things. But you get thios advantage in all languages: Java has it, .Net has it. Objective-C got it. And all possibilities you need? You can do your Web Service compliant to standards easily in Java and .Net. This platform indipendence? Sorry who needs that? It is not that common. And you get all disadvantages like platform indipendence - Windows APIs are only available on Windows :)

    That was my 2 cent. Hopefully it was usefull.

    Konrad

    • Marked as answer by Paul Zhou Monday, March 21, 2011 2:15 AM
    Saturday, March 12, 2011 6:28 PM
  • 1.java is open source

    2. its platform independent

    3. c# mostly similar to java

     


    simbu
    Sunday, March 13, 2011 5:16 PM
  • I disagree in multiple points:

    a) I do not count Java as "open source". Ok, it is open source in a way that you get some source. But it is not open source because there is no free implementation that is under a fully acceptable open source licence like GPL and others. (Please see the problem, that apache tries to escalate and the responsible people are not even bothered to answer. I iwll not write much more about it.)

    b) c# is mostly similar to java? Ok, regarding the core language maybe. But this is simply crap. As crap as the university professor that told us a few years ago, that you learn a language in 2 days. Sorry, but you have to compare more than just the language. Java requires also a knowledge of the library and the VM. And all the stuff around (e.g. Application Server stuff). And regarding C# you need to know the library, too and how everything fit together. Great if you know C# - but what do you write? A Hello World program? Sorry, you need to know much more to do some development.

    But this discussion leads to nothing so I shut up now. A student should concentrate on one language and try to master it. It does not matter, which language it is. Even if he is choosing COBOL he could find a job later :)

    With kind regards,

    Konrad

    Sunday, March 13, 2011 5:56 PM
  • I'm with Konrad. "The language itself does not matter".

    Good principles are good principals no matter the language. The discussion about who's the better language is plain silly academic. By the way C# is not like Java, they both come from C++ (originally called "C with Classes"). So the syntax is pretty much the same.

    Now if you discuss the IDE's, the results of the compiler of each language and the runtime that will run those compiled bits, there's a discussion worth having. And in that case .Net is very far away from anything else. Why is Java used? Quite simple:

    MS Visual Studio stats on $549 whereas Eclipse is free. Just a Hello world is enough to figure out which is better.

    .Net runtime is only available on Windows OSs which are not that free whereas there's runtimes for almost every OS alive, including the most of the free ones.

    As I say in this cases that, if the option is purely techinal, .Net and C# is the way to go. If there are commercial, religious or whater other reasons, it's not techenical and I have no further comments.

    Just parenthesis about some cases where hardware manipulation must be optimized like in heavy graphics software, drivers and the likes, C++ or even Assembly is the way to go.


    Bigsby, Lisboa, Portugal
    O que for, quando for, é que será o que é...
    Wenn ist das Nunstruck git und Slotermeyer? Ja! ... Beiherhund das Oder die Flipperwaldt gersput!
    http://bigsby.eu
    Sunday, March 13, 2011 11:47 PM
  • Ha ha seems like very silly question but intellectual.

    there are lot of factors involved while selecting the technologies for the Business solutions.

    Think in the maintenance perspective, initial purchase cost and the cost of mainitaing the project life time.

     

    Regards

    Lok

    PalleTechnologies


    Regards Palle Technologies http://www.techpalle.com
    Thursday, March 17, 2011 3:40 PM
  • Hi,

    After 7 years of .net experience, Now I see there are very less projects in .NET. if they are there, most of them are support and maintenance. 

    In India-Bangalore, There are very less jobs in comparison to java in .NET.

    Worried, One day will come and Microsoft also stop supporting the .NET like Windows Phone.

    Very Limited Opportunity in C# compare to Java in terms of Latest Innovations.



    Vikas Gupta


    • Edited by VikasGupta Saturday, May 26, 2018 5:25 PM
    Saturday, May 26, 2018 5:15 PM