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32 Bit Database File - How To Open In Access 2010 in 64 Bit RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi Guys

    I've been reading up online and haven't been able to come up with a definitive solution.

    My colleague is trying to open a 32 bit .accde file using the 64 bit version of Access 2010. She cannot go down to the 32 bit version.

    Can I ask the quickest and easiest way of accessing the file in the 64 bit version of Access

    Thank you in advance for any assistance

    Wednesday, August 5, 2015 4:23 PM

Answers

  • First, let me make clear what I'm saying.  Usually an ACCDE is created to protect the design of forms, reports, and VBA codein a database application.  The ACCDE may or may not contain the actual data tables -- often, it contains only links to the tables in another database (generally referred to as the "back-end", whereas the ACCDE is the "front-end").

    If she has only 64-bit Access and the ACCDE was built with 32-bit Access, then she won't be able to open and run the ACCDE as an *application* -- she won't be able to run the forms and reports, and won't be able to execute any code it contains. 

    All I'm talking about is a way to get to the tables (if any) and queries in the ACCDE.

    To do that, she would open her copy of Access without selecting an existing database.  She would then tell it to create a new, blank database (not a web database).  She'd have to provide a name and folder path for that database, and then click the "Create" button.  Access will create the database and open it, and will probably open an intial sample table, "Table1".  She should just close that table.

    She should then go to the "External Data" tab on the ribbon, and from the "Import & Link" tab group she should click "Access".  She'll tehn be shown a dialog prompting her to specify the source of the data.  She should enter or browse to & select the ACCDE that she's interested in.  She should also choose the option, "Link to the data source by creating a linked table".  The she should click the OK button.

    She'll then be shown a Link Tables dialog where she can select the tables to be linked.  It will only show the tables that actually reside in the database she's linking to -- if the ACCDE has linked tables to a back-end somewhere, those tables won't appear.  She should then select the tables she wants to link, click the OK button, and Access will take it from there.

    If it turns out that the ACCDE has only linked its tables, then she can import the table links instead of linking tables. She'd follow basically the the same process but instead of choosing the "Link ..." option, she'll choose "Import ..." instead. That will copy the table *links* from the ACCDE into her working database.

    If the ACCDE contains stored queries that she wants to use, she can import them. To do that, she would use a similar procedure, except that she woluld choose the "Import" option, go to the Queries tab of the Import dialog, and select the queries she wants.


    Dirk Goldgar, MS Access MVP
    Access tips: www.datagnostics.com/tips.html

    Wednesday, August 5, 2015 6:25 PM
  • Hi. Glad to hear you got it sorted out. As for articles, perhaps this could be a good place to start:

    https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee691831(office.14).aspx

    Good luck with your project.

    Thursday, August 6, 2015 2:37 PM

All replies

  • Hi. Sorry if this is a dumb question but what is happening or not happening when she tries to open the ACCDE in 64-bit Access?
    Wednesday, August 5, 2015 4:30 PM
  • Thank you for replying so quickly. The error message : -

    The database was created with the 32 bit version of Microsoft Access. Please Open It With The 32 Bit Version of Microsoft Access.

    Wednesday, August 5, 2015 4:32 PM
  • Does she need to run the application, or would it be enough to just read/edit the data in the database?  I don't think there's any way to run a 32-bit ACCDE in 64-bit Access, because the VBA project can't be converted.  But if she just needs to get to the data, she can probably create a new ACCDB database in 64-bit Access and link to the tables in the 32-bit ACCDE.

    Dirk Goldgar, MS Access MVP
    Access tips: www.datagnostics.com/tips.html


    Wednesday, August 5, 2015 4:51 PM
  • Thank You Dirk.

    I'm not an expert in this field but I'm trying to help, could you possibly provide instructions or link to instructions so that I can action the step you mentioned?

    "she can probably create a new ACCDB database in 64-bit Access and link to the tables in the 32-bit ACCDE."

    Thanks again for all your help, much appreciated


    Wednesday, August 5, 2015 4:56 PM
  • Okay, thanks. That makes sense now. Are you saying the ACCDB version is not available to her anymore? If it was, she can try to open the ACCDB in 64-bit and try to compile it there to see if it can converted into ACCDE. She may have to adjust some code to do so though. Just a thought...
    Wednesday, August 5, 2015 5:15 PM
  • First, let me make clear what I'm saying.  Usually an ACCDE is created to protect the design of forms, reports, and VBA codein a database application.  The ACCDE may or may not contain the actual data tables -- often, it contains only links to the tables in another database (generally referred to as the "back-end", whereas the ACCDE is the "front-end").

    If she has only 64-bit Access and the ACCDE was built with 32-bit Access, then she won't be able to open and run the ACCDE as an *application* -- she won't be able to run the forms and reports, and won't be able to execute any code it contains. 

    All I'm talking about is a way to get to the tables (if any) and queries in the ACCDE.

    To do that, she would open her copy of Access without selecting an existing database.  She would then tell it to create a new, blank database (not a web database).  She'd have to provide a name and folder path for that database, and then click the "Create" button.  Access will create the database and open it, and will probably open an intial sample table, "Table1".  She should just close that table.

    She should then go to the "External Data" tab on the ribbon, and from the "Import & Link" tab group she should click "Access".  She'll tehn be shown a dialog prompting her to specify the source of the data.  She should enter or browse to & select the ACCDE that she's interested in.  She should also choose the option, "Link to the data source by creating a linked table".  The she should click the OK button.

    She'll then be shown a Link Tables dialog where she can select the tables to be linked.  It will only show the tables that actually reside in the database she's linking to -- if the ACCDE has linked tables to a back-end somewhere, those tables won't appear.  She should then select the tables she wants to link, click the OK button, and Access will take it from there.

    If it turns out that the ACCDE has only linked its tables, then she can import the table links instead of linking tables. She'd follow basically the the same process but instead of choosing the "Link ..." option, she'll choose "Import ..." instead. That will copy the table *links* from the ACCDE into her working database.

    If the ACCDE contains stored queries that she wants to use, she can import them. To do that, she would use a similar procedure, except that she woluld choose the "Import" option, go to the Queries tab of the Import dialog, and select the queries she wants.


    Dirk Goldgar, MS Access MVP
    Access tips: www.datagnostics.com/tips.html

    Wednesday, August 5, 2015 6:25 PM
  • Good Morning All

    Thank you so much for your comprehensive replies, with your assistance we have managed to access the file. 

    On a side note, would it be worth Microsoft creating a definitive article that discusses this issue? Hopefully other people in my position will find this forum post to be helpful if nothing else.

    Thanks Again

    Thursday, August 6, 2015 10:54 AM
  • Hi. Glad to hear you got it sorted out. As for articles, perhaps this could be a good place to start:

    https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee691831(office.14).aspx

    Good luck with your project.

    Thursday, August 6, 2015 2:37 PM
  • I was with the same problem.

    Just installed Access 2010Runtime (even with the Office 2013 64bit installed) and it worked.
    https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=10910

    Regards

    Monday, February 19, 2018 1:54 AM
  • Hi sir I try it but it not work still give the same error 32 bit version.

    I used office 2013 

    regards

    Saturday, March 30, 2019 2:34 PM
  • It not clear at all what is not working for you.

    You can’t use an x32 bit accDE appcation with the x64 bit version.

    However, you CAN create blank new database, and import the tables (data). If the accDE file in question ONLY has some data you wish to work with, then this may well work well for you.

    However, if you need to use the forms, reports, and the application someone has created in Access, then you have a VERY different problem to solve.

    The possible solutions are:

    Use an accDB as opposed to an accDE. An accDB can be opened and used with both x32 and x64 bit office. However, if the application is complex, and the x32 bit version used x32 bit features, then you have to work with the original developer of the application and have them modify their code to work for both x32 and x64 bit versions of Access/office.

    How to fix and deal with this issue is outlined here:

    https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/office/client-developer/shared/compatibility-between-the-32-bit-and-64-bit-versions-of-office

    Another possible work around is to install the access 2010 x64 bit runtime on that computer. This will allow the user to launch + use the Application as x32 even with your current x64 bit version of office.

    So, it not at all clear what is not working but it REALLY comes down to what you attempted, and what will work for you.

    As noted, perhaps you just need to look at the tables and view the data. If this is acceptable, then creating a blank new database (which will default to x64 bits), and THEN you simply import the data (tables) into this new accDB file. However, this will ONLY get you the tables. The forms, reports, code and the rest of the application can NOT be copied over this way.

    So, best approach is to use an accDB. If you must use an accDE, then you have to go back to the original creator of the database, and have them create an x64 bit version of the accDE for you.

    So, you can use + see + view the data by importing, but if you need the application parts such as forms, reports, code etc., then you MUST go back to the original accDB used to create the accDE and produce a x64 bit version of the accDE for this to work. (In most cases you can just open + use the accDB).

    So, using an accDB is the starting point for this solution.

    As noted, because the above can be a real hassle and a lot of work, then consider the idea of installing a x32 bit version of the Access 2010 runtime – as that is also a workaround but a far less painful workaround if you don’t’ have the time, the people and the expertise available to create a x64 bit version of the accDE.

    So this will come down to your ability to talk to, and deal with, and work with the person who created the accDE for you. Perhaps that person is sitting next to you – so not a big deal or problem.

    However, if that person is not available, or does not have the skill set to create the x64 bit version of the accDE for you, then installing an x32 bit version of the Access runtime is far less work and painful then working on the accDB to make it compatible with both x32 and x64.

    Note that AFTER the accDB is made to work with both x32, and x64, if you ARE still wanting to use an x64 bit version of the accDE, then you MUST compile (make) the accDE x64 bit version with an x64 bit version of Access. So while the accDB can be made to work with both x32 and x64, the resulting accDE MUST ALWAYS be created with the same bit size version (x32 or x64) that matches the SAME x32 or x64 bit version the user is working with.

    So which solution works best for you will depend on the availability of the person who created the accDE in the first place. If that person is available, then you can give that person the included link for information on how to make their accDB work for both x32 and x64 versions of Access.

    Regards,

    Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP 2003-2017)

    Edmonton, Alberta Canada

    Saturday, March 30, 2019 5:52 PM