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How is DSS lightweight RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi All,

    I am looking for material that explains to me why DSS is light weight. One of the unique things I see about DSS is that it uses DSSP, which is an implementation of SOAP. I skimped through the DSSP protocol specification. They only make a statement that DSSP is light weight and they do not talk about how DSSP implementation is light as compared to other implementations. Can you please help me out in understanding why DSS is light weight.

    Thanks,

    Venkat 

    Wednesday, October 12, 2011 10:58 PM
    Moderator

Answers

  • It is best not to ask another question on the same thread. Start a new thread for a new question.

    DSS can use either HTTP or TCP. When you run DssHost you specify two ports on the command line. The /p specifies the HTTP port and the /t specifies the TCP port. If you omit the /t, then everything runs over HTTP which will work, but it is much slower because there is more serialization overhead.

    Trevor

    Friday, November 18, 2011 8:41 AM

All replies

  • Hi All,

     

    I was wondering if anyone had an opportunity to look at this.

     

    Thanks,

     

    Venkat

    Monday, October 24, 2011 4:05 PM
    Moderator
  • It is light-weight because DSSP has a limited number of Verbs/Actions and is relatively low overhead.

    Full web services with SOAP are more complicated.

    Trevor

     

    Tuesday, November 1, 2011 4:46 AM
  • Thanks Trevor your time and reply. Also, I was wondering if DSSP runs on top of TCP or HTTP? I believe it runs directly on top of TCP.
    Thursday, November 3, 2011 8:59 AM
    Moderator
  • Hi,

     

    I was wondering if anyone had an opportunity to look at this.

     

    Thanks,

     

    Venkat

    Monday, November 14, 2011 4:14 PM
    Moderator
  • It is best not to ask another question on the same thread. Start a new thread for a new question.

    DSS can use either HTTP or TCP. When you run DssHost you specify two ports on the command line. The /p specifies the HTTP port and the /t specifies the TCP port. If you omit the /t, then everything runs over HTTP which will work, but it is much slower because there is more serialization overhead.

    Trevor

    Friday, November 18, 2011 8:41 AM
  • Thanks Trever for your time and explanation. I will make sure that I will keep in mind to start a new thread for a new question.
    Friday, November 18, 2011 1:05 PM
    Moderator