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Access MDB RRS feed

  • Question

  • User364663285 posted

    Hi,
    I think it's awful and unnecessary to choose the captioned one if we wanna have a long-term investment for the web site, when comparing it with Sql server/Oracle. Or we can say we'll be definitely restricted by this kind of DB for any future development. Any information for any extra charges of the captioned application if it's considered for the web development.

    Thursday, April 2, 2009 4:36 AM

Answers

  • User-821857111 posted

    Depends on what you want to use it for.  If you think that your database will grow to more than 4GB or that you will have a lot of traffic then Access is not a good idea.  Otherwise, it's fine.  I would say that there are probably many thousands of sites that use Access quite happily, and never need to change.  Especially small to medium company intranet sites.

     

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Thursday, April 2, 2009 3:37 PM

All replies

  • User97111691 posted

    You shud not say its awful. it helped lots of business in the initial days.

    Thursday, April 2, 2009 5:14 AM
  • User364663285 posted

    Thanks. How about any long-term development?

    Thursday, April 2, 2009 5:19 AM
  • User-821857111 posted

    Depends on what you want to use it for.  If you think that your database will grow to more than 4GB or that you will have a lot of traffic then Access is not a good idea.  Otherwise, it's fine.  I would say that there are probably many thousands of sites that use Access quite happily, and never need to change.  Especially small to medium company intranet sites.

     

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Thursday, April 2, 2009 3:37 PM
  • User364663285 posted

    Hi,

    Some people said that it's extremely slow even if it only involves a few hundred MB of data, in the Access DB file. Any advice?

    Friday, May 8, 2009 2:39 AM
  • User-821857111 posted

    It's not necessarily the amount of data that causes a database to be slow.  Other factors are involved such as table design, indexes, queries etc.  Access is definitely slower than SQL Server - given that all other things are equal, but the only time your users are likely to see this is if you have loads of data poorly organised accessed by lots of users at the same time.

    Best thing to do is design your application to run against any database, then start with Access, and if you find it isn't up to the task in your particular case, switch to SQL Server.

     

    Friday, May 8, 2009 9:06 AM
  • User364663285 posted

    Many thanks Mike. Undoubtedly, we should have the indexes on the tables on any kind of database. The question now is, given the same conditions, like for 2 exactly equivalent tables and each of them have 500 Mbytes of data inside and both tables have exactly the same indexes on the same columns, is there any difference by the speed of their response time on them?

    I expect to see, something like, for example, approximately Oracle needs only 16 seconds, but Access needs 200 seconds and etc. Many thanks in advance.

    Wednesday, May 13, 2009 3:37 AM
  • User-821857111 posted

     

    I expect to see, something like, for example, approximately Oracle needs only 16 seconds, but Access needs 200 seconds and etc

    I can tell you know that Oracle will be faster.  Just as SQL Server will be faster than Access.  But I cannot give you figures.  I have never tested it, and even if I did, that is no guarantee that you will get the same results.  And even then, will the difference actually matter?  That depends on so many variables that it is impossible for anyone to guess.

     

    Wednesday, May 13, 2009 11:58 AM
  • User-1243272925 posted

     Hi Mike,

                  how many connections Access can open at the same time?  Thanks

    Tuesday, May 19, 2009 12:35 PM
  • User-821857111 posted

    how many connections Access can open at the same time?  Thanks
     

    Jet (the provider you use with an Access database file) has a theoretical limit of 255 concurrent connections. That means 255 people simultaneously requesting a web page on your site at exactly the same time.  If one of them hits the Enter key half a second after the other 254, that one is not simultaneous.

    Lets assume that your page makes one call to the database.  Let's also assume that it takes 0.25 seconds for the connection to open, the data to be retrieved, and then the connection closed again.  In theory, that means Jet could support 1000 visitors a second. In practice, I would not use it for that level of traffic.  However, if you make good use of caching and ensure that your data access code is efficient, you will probably be quite surprised at how scalable Jet is - especially if the operations are primarily read-only.

     

    Wednesday, May 20, 2009 2:31 AM
  • User-1243272925 posted

     Thanks Mike,

                          this information was very usefull.  One more question, I am writting a small CMS with Access database.  Can you please tell me or provide me some usefull linkes how can I use cahsing in this CMS I am developing.  specially how can I use cahsing to load munues, submenues and contents .  because i will be pulling menues and conentes from database.  Thanks in advance.

    Wednesday, May 20, 2009 5:49 AM